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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 201-225 out of 414.

<< < 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 > >>

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
JAMA Psychiatry
APOE, diagnostic accuracy of CSF biomarkers for Alzheimer disease
Cerebral spinal fluid levels of β-amyloid 42(Aβ42) are associated with the diagnosis of Alzheimer disease and (Aβ) accumulation in the brain independent of apolipoprotein E gene makeup.

Contact: Ronald Lautner
ronald.lautner@neuro.gu.se
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
JAMA Dermatology
Photodynamic therapy vs. cryotherapy for actinic keratoses
Photodynamic therapy (PDT, which uses topical agents and light to kill tissue) appears to better clear actinic keratoses (AKs, a common skin lesion caused by sun damage) at three months after treatment than cryotherapy (which uses liquid nitrogen to freeze lesions).

Contact: Charles Casey
charles.casey@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu
916-734-9048
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
JAMA Surgery
Bundled approach to reduce surgical site infections in colorectal surgery
A multidisciplinary program (called a 'bundle') that spanned the phases of perioperative care helped reduce surgical site infections in patients undergoing colorectal surgery at an academic medical center.

Contact: Sarah Avery
sarah.avery@duke.edu
919-660-1306
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
PLOS ONE
Orphaned children can do just as well in institutions
The removal of institutions or group homes will not lead to better child well-being and could even worsen outcomes for some orphaned and separated children, according to new findings from a three-year study across five low- and middle-income countries. Children in institutions are as healthy and, in some ways, healthier than those in family-based care, according to the Duke University study.
NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Contact: Kyle Hamilton
kyle.hamilton@chpir.org
919-613-5470
Duke University

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
Genome Biology
Better classification to improve treatments for breast cancer
Breast cancer can be classified into ten different subtypes, and scientists have developed a tool to identify which is which. The research, published in the journal Genome Biology, could improve treatments and targeting of treatments for the disease.

Contact: Shane Canning
shane.canning@biomedcentral.com
44-203-192-2429
BioMed Central

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
Global Ecology and Biogeography
New study charts the global invasion of crop pests
Many of the world's most important crop-producing countries will be fully saturated with pests by the middle of the century if current trends continue, according to a new study led by the University of Exeter.
Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council

Contact: Eleanor Gaskarth
e.f.gaskarth@exeter.ac.uk
44-782-730-9332
University of Exeter

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
Nature
Breaking benzene
In research published in Nature, Zhaomin Hou and colleagues from the RIKEN Center for Sustainable Resource Science in Japan have demonstrated a way to use a metallic complex, trinuclear titanium hydride, to accomplish the task of activating benzene by breaking the aromatic carbon-carbon bonds at relatively mild temperatures and in a highly selective way.

Contact: Jens Wilkinson
jens.wilkinson@riken.jp
81-048-462-1225
RIKEN

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
Nature
Researchers switch emotion linked to memory
Researchers from the RIKEN-MIT Center for Neural Circuit Genetics revealed the brain pathway that links external events to the internal emotional state, forming one memory by engaging different brain areas. The study published in the journal Nature, also demonstrates that the positive or negative emotional valence of memory can be reversed during later memory recall.

Contact: Jens Wilkinson
jens.wilkinson@riken.jp
81-048-462-1225
RIKEN

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
PLOS ONE
Stone-tipped spears lethal, may indicate early cognitive and social skills
Attaching a stone tip on to a wooden spear shaft was a significant innovation for early modern humans living around 500,000 years ago. However, it was also a costly behavior in terms of time and effort to collect, prepare and assemble the spear. Arizona State University and University of Cape Town researchers conducted controlled experiments to learn if there was a 'wounding' advantage between using a wooden spear or a stone-tipped spear.
Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada

Contact: Benjamin Schoville
benjamin.schoville@asu.edu
27-076-136-4669
Arizona State University

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
Science Translational Medicine
New drug promises relief for inflammatory pain, Stanford scientists say
Researchers have discovered that a compound they developed could potentially serve as a painkiller, with particular utility for East Asians with an alcohol-metabolizing enzyme mutation.

Contact: Rosanne Spector
manishma@stanford.edu
650-725-5374
Stanford University Medical Center

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
Nature
Neuroscientists reverse memories' emotional associations
A new study from MIT neuroscientists reveals the brain circuit that controls how memories become linked with positive or negative emotions.
The RIKEN Brain Science Institute, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, JPB Foundation

Contact: Sarah McDonnell
s_mcd@mit.edu
617-253-8923
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
Nature
Evolution used similar molecular toolkits to shape flies, worms, and humans
Although separated by hundreds of millions of years of evolution, flies, worms, and humans share ancient patterns of gene expression, according to a massive Yale-led analysis of genomic data. Two related studies led by scientists at Harvard and Stanford, also published Aug. 28 in the same issue of the journal Nature, tell a similar story: even though humans, worms, and flies bear little obvious similarity to each other, evolution used remarkably similar molecular toolkits to shape them.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Bill Hathaway
william.hathaway@yale.edu
203-432-1322
Yale University

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
Nature
Stanford researchers work to understand gene expression across organisms
Fruit flies and roundworms have long been used as model organisms to learn more about human biology and disease. Now, researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have found that although many aspects of regulatory networks are conserved among the three distantly related organisms, other differences have emerged over evolutionary time.

Contact: Krista Conger
kristac@stanford.edu
650-725-5371
Stanford University Medical Center

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
Frontiers in Psychology
Junk food makes rats lose appetite for balanced diet
A diet of junk food not only makes rats fat, but also reduces their appetite for novel foods, a preference that normally drives them to seek a balanced diet, reports a study published in the open-access journal Frontiers in Psychology.

Contact: Gozde Zorlu
press@frontiersin.org
41-021-510-1712
Frontiers

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
PLOS ONE
Xenon exposure shown to erase traumatic memories
McLean Hospital researchers are reporting that xenon gas, used in humans for anesthesia and diagnostic imaging, has the potential to be a treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder and other memory-related disorders.
National Institutes of Health Grant, O'Keefe Family Junior Investigator Award, McLean Hospital

Contact: Jenna Brown
jbrown66@partners.org
617-855-2110
McLean Hospital

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
Global Change Biology
Museum specimens, modern cities show how an insect pest will respond to climate change
Researchers from North Carolina State University have found that century-old museum specimens hold clues to how global climate change will affect a common insect pest that can weaken and kill trees -- and the news is not good.
US Geological Survey, National Science Foundation, US Department of Agriculture

Contact: Matt Shipman
matt_shipman@ncsu.edu
919-515-6386
North Carolina State University

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
Nature
Detecting neutrinos, physicists look into the heart of the sun
Using one of the most sensitive neutrino detectors on the planet, an international team of physicists including Andrea Pocar, Laura Cadonati and doctoral student Keith Otis at the University of Massachusetts Amherst report in the current issue of Nature that for the first time they have directly detected neutrinos created by the 'keystone' proton-proton fusion process going on at the sun's core.
National Science Foundation, Italian National Institute for Nuclear Physics

Contact: Edward Blaguszewski
edblag@admin.umass.edu
413-545-0444
University of Massachusetts at Amherst

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
PLOS ONE
Bronze Age wine cellar found
A Bronze Age palace excavation reveals an ancient wine cellar, according to a study published Aug. 27, 2014 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Andrew Koh from Brandeis University and colleagues.
Brandeis University, University of Haifa, George Washington University, National Geographic Society, Israel Science Foundation, Institute for Aegean Prehistory, Bronfman Philanthropies

Contact: Kayla Graham
onepress@plos.org
PLOS

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
PLOS ONE
Stone-tipped spears more damaging than sharpened wooden spears
Experimental comparison may show that stone-tipped spears do not penetrate as deep, but may still cause more damage, than sharpened wooden spears.
Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada

Contact: Kayla Graham
onepress@plos.org
PLOS

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
Nature
Scientists map the 'editing marks' on fly, worm, human genomes
In the Aug. 28 issue of the journal Nature a multi-institution research network called modENCODE (the Model Organism ENCylopedia Of DNA Elements) published three major papers that map and compare the genomes and epigenomes of humans and two model organisms, the fly, D. melanogaster, and the worm, C. elegans, in unprecedented detail. The fly and worm could serve as model organisms for screening drugs and micronutrients that might alter the epigenome, which is implicated in many diseases.

Contact: Diana Lutz
dlutz@wustl.edu
314-935-5272
Washington University in St. Louis

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
PLOS ONE
Wolves susceptible to yawn contagion
Wolves may be susceptible to yawn contagion, according to a study published Aug. 27, 2014 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE.
Japan Society for the Promotion of Science Research Fellowship, Japanese Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, Scientific Research on Innovative Areas

Contact: Kayla Graham
onepress@plos.org
PLOS

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
Neurology Neuroimmunology & Neuroinflammation
Researchers investigating new treatment for multiple sclerosis
A new treatment under investigation for multiple sclerosis is safe and tolerable in phase 1 clinical trials, according to a study published Aug. 27, 2014, in Neurology Neuroimmunology & Neuroinflammation, a new online-only, freely accessible, specialty medical journal. The publication is part of the Neurology family of journals, published by the American Academy of Neurology.

Contact: Rachel Seroka
rseroka@aan.com
612-928-6129
American Academy of Neurology

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
Astrophysical Journal Letters
What lit up the universe?
New research from UCL shows we will soon uncover the origin of the ultraviolet light that bathes the cosmos, helping scientists understand how galaxies were built. The study published today in the Astrophysical Journal Letters by UCL cosmologists Dr. Andrew Pontzen and Dr. Hiranya Peiris, together with collaborators at Princeton and Barcelona universities, shows how forthcoming astronomical surveys will reveal what lit up the cosmos.
Royal Society, National Science Foundation, Science and Technology Facilities Council, European Research Council

Contact: Rebecca Caygill
r.caygill@ucl.ac.uk
020-310-83846
University College London

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
Nature
Flexing the brain: Why learning tasks can be difficult
Learning a new skill is easier when it is related to an ability we already have. For example, a trained pianist can learn a new melody easier than learning how to hit a tennis serve. Scientists from the Center for the Neural Basis of Cognition -- a joint program between Carnegie Mellon University and the University of Pittsburgh -- have discovered a fundamental constraint in the brain that may explain why this happens.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, Burroughs Wellcome Fund

Contact: Shilo Rea
shilo@cmu.edu
412-268-6094
Carnegie Mellon University

Public Release: 26-Aug-2014
Animal Reproduction Science
Piglet weaning age no bar to litter frequency
University of Adelaide research has shown that piglets can be weaned later with no negative effects on sow birthing frequency.

Contact: Alice Weaver
alice.weaver@adelaide.edu.au
61-407-974-638
University of Adelaide

Showing releases 201-225 out of 414.

<< < 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 > >>