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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 201-225 out of 477.

<< < 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 > >>

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Cancer and the immune system: A double-edged sword
During cancer development, tumor cells decorate their surfaces with sugar compounds called glycans that are different from those found on normal, healthy cells. Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine report that sialic acids at the tips of these cancer cell glycans are capable of engaging with immune system cells and changing the latter's response to the tumor -- for good and bad.
Swiss National Science Foundation, Samuel and Ruth Engelberg Cancer Research Institute, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Scott LaFee
slafee@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
American Journal of Psychiatry
To curb violent tendencies, start young
Aggressive children are less likely to become violent criminals or psychiatrically troubled adults if they receive intensive early intervention, say a new study based on more than two decades of research. The study from researchers at Duke and three other universities provides some of the strongest evidence yet that violent tendencies can be curbed.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, US Department of Education, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Alison Jones
Alison.jones@duke.edu
919-681-8504
Duke University

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
Journal of Bacteriology
Strategic self-sabotage? MRSA inhibits its own growth
Scientists at the University of Western Ontario have uncovered a bacterial mystery. Against all logic, the most predominant strain of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in North American produces an enzyme that degrades skin secretions into compounds that are toxic to itself. The research is published online ahead of print in the Journal of Bacteriology.

Contact: Jim Sliwa
jsliwa@asmusa.org
American Society for Microbiology

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
Journal of the American College of Cardiology
Cardiorespiratory fitness can delay male, age-associated blood pressure hikes
A man's cardiorespiratory fitness can drastically delay the natural, age-associated increase of his blood pressure over his adult life span. According to a study published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, men with higher fitness levels experience a delay in the development of hypertension when compared to those with lower fitness levels.

Contact: Rachel Cagan
rcagan@acc.org
202-375-6395
American College of Cardiology

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
Canadian Medical Association Journal
Implementing new care strategies can cut health care usage among system's biggest users
Co-ordinating patient care better can reduce use of the health care system by its most frequently seen patients, according to new research published in the Canadian Medical Association Journal.

Contact: Geoff Koehler
koehlerg@smh.ca
416-864-6060 x6537
St. Michael's Hospital

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Slow to mature, quick to distract: ADHD study finds slower development of connections
A peek inside the brains of more than 750 children and teens reveals a key difference in brain architecture between those with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and those without. Kids and teens with ADHD, a new study finds, lag behind others of the same age in how quickly their brains form connections within, and between, key brain networks.
National Institutes of Health, University of Michigan, John Templeton Foundation

Contact: Kara Gavin
kegavin@umich.edu
734-764-2220
University of Michigan Health System

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
Journal of Experimental Medicine
T-bet tackles hepatitis
A single protein may tip the balance between ridding the body of a dangerous hepatitis virus and enduring life-long chronic infection, according to researchers in Germany.
German Federal Ministry of Research, European Research Council

Contact: Rita Sullivan King
news@rupress.org
212-327-8603
Rockefeller University Press

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
Journal of Experimental Medicine
Gut bacteria tire out T cells
Leaky intestines may cripple bacteria-fighting immune cells in patients with common variable immunodeficiency, according to researchers in Switzerland. The study may explain why these patients suffer from recurrent bacterial infections.

Contact: Rita Sullivan King
news@rupress.org
212-327-8603
Rockefeller University Press

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
Nicotine & Tobacco Research
Identifying a better message strategy for dissuading smokers: Add the positive
Which is more likely to convince a smoker to quit? The words, 'Warning: cigarettes cause cancer' beneath the image of an open mouth with a cancerous lesion and rotten teeth, or the same image with the words, 'Warning: Quitting smoking reduces the risk of cancer'? The answer depends on how confident you are in your ability to quit.
American Cancer Society

Contact: Karen Teber
km463@georgetown.edu
Georgetown University Medical Center

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
Clinical Cancer Research
New knowledge of genes driving bladder cancer points to targeted treatments
A collaborative study between researchers at the University of Colorado Cancer Center and the National Cancer Institute published today in the journal Clinical Cancer Research identifies BAP1 mutations in bladder cancer and also, independently, TERT mutations, implying two 'causes' of two distinct types of bladder cancer.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Cancer Institute-Intramural Support Program

Contact: Garth Sundem
garth.sundem@ucdenver.edu
University of Colorado Denver

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association
Congenital and genetic heart disease screening recommendations for people 12-25
When healthcare providers screen people 12-25 years old for underlying congenital/genetic heart disease, there are 14 critical questions on personal and family medical history and specific aspects of the physical examination that should be included. Using 12-lead electrocardiograms to detect underlying congenital or genetic cardiovascular heart disease as a screening tool in healthy people 12-25 years old without positive findings on the history and physical examination has not been shown to save lives.

Contact: Darcy Spitz
darcy.spitz@heart.org
212-878-5940
American Heart Association

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
Arthritis & Rheumatology
Hypersensitivity to non-painful events may be part of pathology in fibromyalgia
New research shows that patients with fibromyalgia have hypersensitivity to non-painful events based on images of the patients' brains, which show reduced activation in primary sensory regions and increased activation in sensory integration areas. Findings published in Arthritis & Rheumatology, a journal of the American College of Rheumatology, suggest that brain abnormalities in response to non-painful sensory stimulation may cause the increased unpleasantness that patients experience in response to daily visual, auditory and tactile stimulation.

Contact: Dawn Peters
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
781-388-8408
Wiley

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Contaminated water in 2 states linked to faulty shale gas wells
Faulty well integrity, not hydraulic fracturing deep underground, is the primary cause of drinking water contamination from shale gas extraction in parts of Pennsylvania and Texas, according to a study by researchers from five universities. The study, which is the first to document methane contamination occurring in previously unaffected water wells, used both hydrocarbon and noble gas tracers to track the contamination back to leaks in gas well casings and cementing.
National Science Foundation, Duke University/Nicholas School of the Environment

Contact: Tim Lucas
tdlucas@duke.edu
919-613-8084
Duke University

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
The quick and the dead among tropical reptiles
Some tropical reptiles may be able to adapt quickly to climate change rather than go extinct as widely expected, a Dartmouth-led study finds.

Contact: John Cramer
John.Cramer@Dartmouth.edu
603-646-9130
Dartmouth College

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
Annals of Internal Medicine
What's more effective: Generic or brand-name statins?
Researchers find that patients taking generic statins were more likely to adhere to their medication and also had a significantly lower rate of cardiovascular events and death.
Teva Pharmaceuticals

Contact: Jessica Maki
jmaki3@partners.org
617-525-6373
Brigham and Women's Hospital

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs
Marijuana users who feel low get high
Adolescents and young adults who smoke marijuana frequently may attempt to manage negative moods by using the drug, according to a study in September's Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH/National Institutes of Health

Contact: Erin Tornatore
erin.tornatore@childrens.harvard.edu
617-919-3110
Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
Annals of Internal Medicine
ACP releases new recommendations for treating urinary incontinence in women
Kegel exercises to strengthen pelvic floor muscles, bladder training, and weight loss and exercise are effective nonsurgical treatment options for women with urinary incontinence, according to a new evidence-based clinical practice guideline from the American College of Physicians (ACP) published today in Annals of Internal Medicine, ACP's flagship journal.

Contact: Steve Majewski
smajewski@acponline.org
American College of Physicians

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
Canadian Medical Association Journal
Care coordination can decrease health-care use by frequent users
Better coordination of patient care between health care providers, encouraging patients to self-manage their health and other strategies can reduce use of the health care system by seniors and people with chronic conditions, according to research published in CMAJ.
Building Bridges to Integrate Care Initiative, Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care

Contact: Kim Barnhardt
kim.barnhardt@cmaj.ca
613-520-7116 x2224
Canadian Medical Association Journal

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
Annals of Internal Medicine
News from Annals of Internal Medicine tip sheet, Sept. 16, 2014
The Sept. 16, 2014, issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine includes the following articles: 'Kegel exercises, weight loss among ACP's recommendations for treating urinary incontinence'; 'Patients on generic statins have better outcomes versus those taking brand-name drugs'; and 'Chiropractic care and exercise provide short-term relief of back-related leg pain.'

Contact: Megan Hanks
mhanks@acponline.org
215-351-2656
American College of Physicians

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America
Wastewater injection is culprit for most quakes in southern Colorado and northern New Mexico
The deep injection of wastewater underground is responsible for the dramatic rise in the number of earthquakes in Colorado and New Mexico since 2001, according to a study to be published in the Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America.

Contact: Nan Broadbent
press@seismosoc.org
408-431-9885
Seismological Society of America

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
Nature Chemical Biology
UK study identifies molecule that induces cancer-killing protein
A new study by University of Kentucky researchers has identified a novel molecule named Arylquin 1 as a potent inducer of Par-4 secretion from normal cells. Par-4 is a protein that acts as a tumor suppressor, killing cancer cells while leaving normal cells unharmed.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, NIH/National Center for Research Resources, UK Center for Clinical and Translational Science

Contact: Allison Perry
allison.perry@uky.edu
859-323-2399
University of Kentucky

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America
M 9.0+ possible for subduction zones along 'Ring of Fire,' suggests new study
The magnitude of the 2011 Tohoku quake (M 9.0) caught many seismologists by surprise, prompting some to revisit the question of calculating the maximum magnitude earthquake possible for a particular fault. New research offers an alternate view that uses the concept of probable maximum magnitude events over a given period, providing the magnitude and the recurrence rate of extreme events in subduction zones for that period. Most circum Pacific subduction zones can produce earthquakes of magnitude greater than 9.0, suggests the study.

Contact: Nan Broadbent
press@seismosoc.org
408-431-9885
Seismological Society of America

Public Release: 14-Sep-2014
ASTRO's 56th Annual Meeting
Advanced esophageal cancer patients who receive RT alone experience less problems when swallowing
Radiation therapy alone is as effective in decreasing swallowing complications experienced by advanced esophageal cancer patients as RT combined with chemotherapy, thus allowing patients to forgo chemotherapy, according to research presented today at the American Society for Radiation Oncology's 56th Annual Meeting.

Contact: Michelle Kirkwood
press@astro.org
703-286-1600
American Society for Radiation Oncology

Public Release: 14-Sep-2014
ASTRO's 56th Annual Meeting
Improved survival shown in early-stage Hodgkin's Disease patients who receive radiation therapy
Patients with stage I and II Hodgkin's Disease who receive consolidated radiation therapy have a higher 10-year survival rate of 84 percent, compared to 76 percent for patients who did not receive RT; and, the data also shows a decrease in utilization of RT, according to research presented today at the American Society for Radiation Oncology's 56th Annual Meeting.

Contact: Michelle Kirkwood
press@astro.org
703-286-1600
American Society for Radiation Oncology

Public Release: 14-Sep-2014
ASTRO's 56th Annual Meeting
Patient-reported data shows RT does not increase risk of lymphedema in node-negative BC patients
A secondary analysis of the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project B-32 trial indicates that radiation therapy does not increase the incidence of lymphedema in patients with node-negative breast cancer, according to research presented today at the American Society for Radiation Oncology's 56th Annual Meeting.

Contact: Michelle Kirkwood
press@astro.org
703-286-1600
American Society for Radiation Oncology

Showing releases 201-225 out of 477.

<< < 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 > >>