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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 201-225 out of 445.

<< < 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 > >>

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters
Special UO microscope captures defects in nanotubes
University of Oregon chemists have devised a way to see the internal structures of electronic waves trapped in carbon nanotubes by external electrostatic charges.
National Science Foundation, Oregon Nanoscience and Microtechnologies Institute

Contact: Jim Barlow
jebarlow@uoregon.edu
541-346-3481
University of Oregon

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
New Horizons in Science 2014
Immersed in violence: How 3-D gaming affects video game players
Playing violent video games in 3-D makes everything seem more real -- and that may have troubling consequences for players, a new study reveals.

Contact: Brad Bushman
Bushman.20@osu.edu
614-688-8779
Ohio State University

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Molecular Cell
NC State researchers advance genome editing technique
Customized genome editing -- the ability to edit desired DNA sequences to add, delete, activate or suppress specific genes -- has major potential for application in medicine, biotechnology, food and agriculture. Now, in a paper published in Molecular Cell, North Carolina State University researchers and colleagues examine six key molecular elements that help drive this genome editing system, which is known as CRISPR-Cas.

Contact: Mick Kulikowski
mick_kulikowski@ncsu.edu
919-515-8387
North Carolina State University

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
American College of Gastroenterology Annual Scientific Meeting 2014
Temple study suggests a novel approach for treating non-cardiac chest pain
Chest pain doesn't necessarily come from the heart. An estimated 200,000 Americans each year experience non-cardiac chest pain. New research authored by Temple University Hospital gastroenterologist Ron Schey, M.D., F.A.C.G., suggests a novel approach to treating non-cardiac chest pain due to esophageal hypersensitivity. The treatment involves a drug called dronabinol, a cannabinoid receptor activator that has traditionally been used to treat nausea and vomiting in HIV patients and for cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy.

Contact: Jeremy Walter
Jeremy.Walter@tuhs.temple.edu
215-707-7882
Temple University Health System

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Liver Transplantation
Preservation technique for marginal livers prevents biliary stricture
New research shows that a preservation technique known as sequential subnormothermic ex vivo liver perfusion (SNEVLP) prevents ischemic type biliary stricture following liver transplantation using grafts from donations after cardiac death (DCD). Findings published in Liver Transplantation, a journal of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases and the International Liver Transplantation Society, indicate that the preservation of DCD grafts using SNEVLP versus cold storage reduces bile duct and endothelial cell injury post transplantation.

Contact: Dawn Peters
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
781-388-8408
Wiley

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Journal of School Violence
UNH research highlights extent and effects of school violence
Six percent of US children and youth missed a day of school over the course of a year because they were the victim of violence or abuse at school. This was a major finding of a study on school safety by University of New Hampshire researchers published this month in the Journal of School Violence.
US Department of Justice, US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Contact: Beth Potier
beth.potier@unh.edu
603-862-1566
University of New Hampshire

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Journal of Creativity in Mental Health
Animal therapy reduces anxiety, loneliness symptoms in college students
Animal-assisted therapy can reduce symptoms of anxiety and loneliness among college students, according to researchers at Georgia State University, Idaho State University and Savannah College of Art and Design.

Contact: LaTina Emerson
lemerson1@gsu.edu
404-413-1353
Georgia State University

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Physical Review Letters
Could I squeeze by you?
Scientists at the US Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory have developed deeper understanding of the ideal design for mesoporous nanoparticles used in catalytic reactions, such as hydrocarbon conversion to biofuels. The research will help determine the optimal diameter of channels within the nanoparticles to maximize catalytic output.
US Department of Energy's Office of Science

Contact: Breehan Gerleman Lucchesi
breehan@ameslab.gov
515-294-9750
DOE/Ames Laboratory

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Space Weather
UNH scientist: Cosmic rays threaten future deep-space astronaut missions
Crewed missions to Mars remain an essential goal for NASA, but scientists are only now beginning to understand and characterize the radiation hazards that could make such ventures risky, concludes a new paper by University of New Hampshire scientists.
NASA, National Science Foundation

Contact: David Sims
david.sims@unh.edu
603-862-5369
University of New Hampshire

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Diabetes
Resetting the circadian clock: Shift workers might want to skip high-iron foods
A study sheds light on higher incidence of metabolic diseases among those who work off-hours.

Contact: Phil Sahm
phil.sahm@hsc.utah.edu
801-581-2517
University of Utah Health Sciences

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
GSA 2014 Annual Meeting
Rising above the risk: America's first tsunami refuge
Washington's coast is so close to the seismically active Cascadia Subduction Zone that if a megathrust earthquake were to occur, a tsunami would hit the Washington shoreline in just 25 minutes.

Contact: Christa Stratton
cstratton@geosociety.org
778-331-7625
Geological Society of America

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Angewandte Chemie
Super stable garnet ceramics may be ideal for high-energy lithium batteries
Scientists have discovered exceptional properties in a garnet material that could enable development of higher-energy battery designs.

Contact: Morgan McCorkle
mccorkleml@ornl.gov
865-574-7308
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
GSA 2014 Annual Meeting
Kung fu stegosaur
Stegosaurs might be portrayed as lumbering plant eaters, but they were lethal fighters when necessary, according to paleontologists who have uncovered new evidence of a casualty of stegosaurian combat. The evidence is a fatal stab wound in the pubis bone of a predatory allosaur. The wound -- in the conical shape of a stegosaur tail spike -- would have required great dexterity to inflict and shows clear signs of having cut short the allosaur's life.

Contact: Christa Stratton
cstratton@geosociety.org
778-331-7625
Geological Society of America

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Perceived hatred fuels conflicts between Democrats and Republicans, Israelis and Palestinians
A new study published in the Proceedings of the National Academic of Sciences by a team of researchers from The New School for Social Research, Northwestern University and Boston College demonstrates how seemingly unsolvable political and ethnic conflicts are fueled by asymmetrical perceptions of opponents' motivations -- and that these tensions can be relieved by providing financial incentives to better understand what drives an adversary group.
Northwestern University, Boston College, Dispute Resolution Research Center at Kellogg School of Management, National Science Foundation, Office of Naval Research

Contact: Sam Biederman
sam.biederman@newschool.edu
212-229-5667 x3094
The New School

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
UEG Week 2014
Promising blood biomarkers identified for colorectal cancer: Is a screening blood test within reach?
The search for blood-borne biomarkers that could be used to screen for colorectal cancer (CRC) has uncovered two promising candidates that may one day lead to the development of a simple blood test. Scientists have been piecing together the molecular events involved in the development of CRC and have identified abnormal DNA methylation patterns and the presence of microRNAs as major players in the carcinogenic process.

Contact: Samantha Forster
samantha@spinkhealth.com
01-444-811-099
Spink Health

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Journal of Food Science
Color and texture matter most when it comes to tomatoes
A new study in the Journal of Food Science, published by the Institute of Food Technologists, evaluated consumers' choice in fresh tomato selection and revealed which characteristics make the red fruit most appealing.

Contact: Stephanie Callahan
scallahan@ift.org
312-604-0273
Institute of Food Technologists

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
The Accounting Review
Less-numerate investors swayed by corporate report presentation effects
Less-numerate investors are more susceptible to style and presentation effects in corporate social responsibility reports, according to research from W. Brooke Elliott, the Roedgers Fellow in Accountancy and Professor Ken Perry Faculty Fellow at the College of Business.

Contact: Phil Ciciora
pciciora@illinois.edu
217-333-2177
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
NASA's Aqua satellite sees Tropical Storm Ana still affecting Hawaii
Slow-moving Tropical Storm Ana was still affecting parts of Hawaii on Oct. 20 when NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead from its orbit in space.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Dissertations and Features
Unconventional experimental design
Over two years of observation McRae, working closely with professor of biology Steven Green, found that he could quite accurately predict what type of predator was threatening a squirrel by analyzing its sounds and tail movements.

Contact: Annette Gallagher
a.gallagher1@umiami.edu
305-284-1121
University of Miami

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
NASA sees Gonzalo affect Bermuda's ocean sediment: Stirred, not shaken
NASA's Aqua and Terra satellites captured before and after images of Bermuda and surrounding waters before and after Hurricane Gonzalo struck the island on Oct. 17.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Sweet science: How chemistry makes your treats sweet (video)
It's National Chemistry Week, and this year's theme is the sweetest of all: candy. Whether it's ice cream, candy bars, pudding or cake, we love our sweets. But why do those treats actually taste sweet? Whether they're made with sugar or artificial sweeteners, it all comes down to chemistry. Find out more here: http://youtu.be/FaBFyEa8-eI.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
NOAA team discovers 2 vessels from WWII convoy battle off North Carolina
A team of researchers led by NOAA's Office of National Marine Sanctuaries have discovered two significant vessels from World War II's Battle of the Atlantic. The German U-boat 576 and the freighter Bluefields were found approximately 30 miles off the coast of North Carolina. Lost for more than 70 years, the discovery of the two vessels, in an area known as the Graveyard of the Atlantic, is a rare window into a historic military battle and the underwater battlefield landscape of WWII.
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, UNC-Coastal Studies Institute, National Park Service

Contact: Lauren Heesemann
lauren.heesemann@noaa.gov
252-475-5495
NOAA Headquarters

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
CHEST 2014
Chest
Blood biomarker may detect lung cancer, study presented at CHEST 2014
A new study shows that patients with stage I to stage III non-small cell lung cancer have different metabolite profiles in their blood than those of patients who are at risk but do not have lung cancer.

Contact: Kristi Bruno
kbruno@chestnet.org
773-750-9962
American College of Chest Physicians

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Frontiers in Zoology
'Shrinking goats' another indicator that climate change affects animal size
Alpine goats appear to be shrinking in size as they react to changes in climate, according to new research from Durham University.
Natural Environment Research Council

Contact: Leighton Kitson
leighton.kitson@durham.ac.uk
44-191-334-6075
Durham University

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
CHEST 2014
Chest
Study shows CPAP use for sleep apnea does not negatively impact sexual quality of life
Patients who use a continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) device to treat obstructive sleep apnea often believe that it makes them less sexually attractive, according to researchers at Rosalind Franklin University.

Contact: Kristi Bruno
kbruno@chestnet.org
773-750-9962
American College of Chest Physicians

Showing releases 201-225 out of 445.

<< < 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 > >>