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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 226-250 out of 539.

<< < 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 > >>

Public Release: 19-Nov-2014
JAMA Dermatology
Laser for tattoo removal appears to improve facial acne scarring
A laser used to remove unwanted tattoos appears to improve facial acne scarring, according to a study published online by JAMA Dermatology.

Contact: Jim Mandler
Jim.mandler@nyumc.org
212-404-3525
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 19-Nov-2014
JAMA Psychiatry
Telemedicine collaborative care for posttraumatic stress disorder in US veterans
Military veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) who live in rural areas successfully engaged in evidence-based psychotherapy through a telemedicine-based collaborative care model thereby improving their clinical outcomes, according to a report published online by JAMA Psychiatry.

Contact: Deborah Bach
bach2@uw.edu
206-543-2580
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 19-Nov-2014
JAMA Surgery
Study examines national trends in mastectomy for early-stage breast cancer
Higher proportions of women eligible for breast conservation surgery are undergoing mastectomy, breast reconstruction and bilateral mastectomy -- surgical removal of both breasts -- with the steepest increases seen in women with lymph node-negative and in situ, contained, disease, according to a report published online by JAMA Surgery.

Contact: Craig Boerner
craig.boerner@vanderbilt.edu
615-322-4747
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 19-Nov-2014
26th EORTC-NCI-AACR Symposium on Molecular Targets and Cancer Therapeutics
Response to new drug in patients with lymphomas and advanced solid tumors
Patients with B-cell Non-Hodgkin lymphomas and advanced solid tumors have responded to a new drug that is being tested for the first time in humans in a phase I trial. Results will be presented at the 26th EORTC-NCI-AACR Symposium. They show responses in four lymphoma patients who have failed numerous previous treatments and in one patient with a cancer for which there is no approved medical treatment at all -- a malignant rhabdoid tumor in the brain.
Eisai, Epizyme Inc.

Contact: Emma Mason
wordmason@mac.com
ECCO-the European CanCer Organisation

Public Release: 19-Nov-2014
26th EORTC-NCI-AACR Symposium on Molecular Targets and Cancer Therapeutics
Researchers pioneer new approach to treating HPV-related cervical cancer
A drug that is already well established as a treatment for infection of the retina in people with AIDS has been shown, for the first time, to sensitise cervical cancer to chemotherapy and radiotherapy without an increase in toxic side-effects. Cidofovir is an anti-viral drug that is effective against several viruses, including the human papilloma virus (HPV), which is implicated in the onset of cervical cancer. The research is presented at the 26th EORTC-NCI-AACR Symposium.

Contact: Emma Mason
wordmason@mac.com
ECCO-the European CanCer Organisation

Public Release: 19-Nov-2014
26th EORTC-NCI-AACR Symposium on Molecular Targets and Cancer Therapeutics
Researchers identify biological indicator of response to new ovarian cancer drug
Researchers have found how to identify which ovarian cancer patients are likely to respond well to a new anti-cancer drug called rucaparib. Clinical trials have shown that women with platinum-based chemotherapy-sensitive tumours, who carry inherited mutations in the BRCA1/2 genes respond well to rucaparib. But in new findings presented at the 26th EORTC-NCI-AACR Symposium, researchers say that they have identified a biological indicator that can predict which women without BRCA1/2 mutations will respond to the drug.
Clovis Oncology

Contact: Emma Mason
wordmason@mac.com
ECCO-the European CanCer Organisation

Public Release: 19-Nov-2014
Oxford Economic Papers
Terrorist attacks decrease fertility levels, says new research
A new study published online today in the journal Oxford Economic Papers has found that, on average, terrorist attacks decrease fertility, reducing both the expected number of children a woman has over her lifetime and the number of live births occurring during each year.
European Commission

Contact: Kirsty Doole
kirsty.doole@oup.com
44-186-535-5439
Oxford University Press

Public Release: 19-Nov-2014
Nature
What agricultural 'ecosystems on steroids' are doing to the air
In a study that identifies a new, 'direct fingerprint' of human activity on Earth, scientists have found that agricultural crops play a big role in seasonal swings of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere.
NASA, National Science Foundation

Contact: Nicole Casal Moore
ncmoore@umich.edu
734-647-7087
University of Michigan

Public Release: 19-Nov-2014
Neuroscience 2014
Pac-Man instead of patch: Using video games to improve lazy eye, depth perception
Scientists have created video games that add an important element of fun to the repetitive training needed to improve vision in people -- including adults -- with a lazy eye and poor depth perception.

Contact: Teng Leng Ooi
Ooi.22@osu.edu
614-292-1384
Ohio State University

Public Release: 19-Nov-2014
Science Translational Medicine
Salk scientists deliver a promising one-two punch for lung cancer
A combination of two unexpected drugs targets tumors.

Contact: Salk Communications
press@salk.edu
Salk Institute

Public Release: 19-Nov-2014
Nature
Crops help to drive greater seasonal change in CO2 cycle
A team of researchers led by Boston University scientists has shown that agricultural production may generate up to a quarter of the increase in seasonal carbon cycle, with corn playing a leading role.
National Aeronautics and Space Administration, National Science Foundation

Contact: Kira Jastive
kjastive@bu.edu
617-358-1240
Boston University

Public Release: 19-Nov-2014
Nature
New understanding of genetic replication could help in the fight against cancer
A new line of research from a team at Florida State University is pushing the limits on what the world knows about how human genetic material is replicated and what that means for people with diseases where the replication process is disrupted, such as cancer.

Contact: Kathleen Haughney
khaughney@fsu.edu
850-644-1489
Florida State University

Public Release: 19-Nov-2014
Nature
Of mice, not men
For more than a century, the laboratory mouse (Mus musculus) has stood in for humans in experiments ranging from deciphering disease and brain function to explaining social behaviors and the nature of obesity. The small rodent has proven to be an indispensable biological tool, the basis for decades of profound scientific discovery and medical progress.
National Institutes of Health, Spanish Plan Nacional, National Science Foundation

Contact: Scott LaFee
slafee@ucsd.edu
619-543-5232
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 19-Nov-2014
Nature
Scientists map mouse genome's 'mission control centers'
When the mouse and human genomes were catalogued more than 10 years ago, an international team of researchers set out to understand and compare the 'mission control centers' found throughout the large stretches of DNA flanking the genes. Their long-awaited report suggests why studies in mice cannot always be reproduced in humans. Importantly, their work also sheds light on the function of DNA's regulatory regions, which are often to blame for common chronic human diseases.
NIH/National Human Genome Research Institute, NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences, NIH/National Cancer Institute, NIH/National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

Contact: Catherine Kolf
ckolf@jhmi.edu
443-287-2251
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 19-Nov-2014
American College of Rheumatology annual meeting
Study shows rheumatoid arthritis support and education program has strong positive impact
A study at Hospital for Special Surgery finds that an education and support program for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients has a strong positive impact on their lives. The free monthly program was developed based on patient feedback. In the study, 90 percent of participants indicated they could make informed choices about their RA after attending the group.

Contact: Robin Frank
FrankR@hss.edu
516-773-0319
Hospital for Special Surgery

Public Release: 19-Nov-2014
Science Translational Medicine
Gut microbiota influences blood-brain barrier permeability
A new study in mice, conducted by researchers at Sweden's Karolinska Institutet together with colleagues in Singapore and the United States, shows that our natural gut-residing microbes can influence the integrity of the blood-brain barrier, which protects the brain from harmful substances in the blood.
Swedish Research Council, Swedish Brain Foundation, TORNADO, Merieux Foundation, Wenner-Gren Foundation, Singapore Millenium foundation, Nanyang Technological University

Contact: Press Office
pressinfo@ki.se
46-852-486-077
Karolinska Institutet

Public Release: 19-Nov-2014
Genome Medicine
Real-time genome sequencing helps control hospital outbreak
Pioneering use of whole genome sequencing in real time to help control a hospital outbreak is reported in an article published in the open access journal Genome Medicine. The research corroborates the use of the technique as a rapid and cost-effective way of tracking and controlling the spread of drug-resistant hospital pathogens.

Contact: Shane Canning
shane.canning@biomedcentral.com
44-203-192-2243
BioMed Central

Public Release: 19-Nov-2014
Astronomy & Astrophysics
Spooky alignment of quasars across billions of light-years
Observations with ESO's Very Large Telescope have revealed alignments over the largest structures ever discovered in the universe. A European research team has found that the rotation axes of the central supermassive black holes in a sample of quasars are parallel to each other over distances of billions of light-years. Also found was that the rotation axes of these quasars tend to be aligned with the structures in the cosmic web in which they reside.

Contact: Richard Hook
rhook@eso.org
49-893-200-6655
ESO

Public Release: 19-Nov-2014
Environmental Research Letters
Sun's rotating 'magnet' pulls lightning towards UK
The sun may be playing a part in the generation of lightning strikes on Earth by temporarily 'bending' the Earth's magnetic field and allowing a shower of energetic particles to enter the upper atmosphere.

Contact: Michael Bishop
michael.bishop@iop.org
44-117-930-1032
Institute of Physics

Public Release: 19-Nov-2014
Nature
Stanford researchers compare mammals' genomes to aid human clinical research
Unprecedented comparisons between the human and mouse genome reveal both shared general principles and important differences in how each species' genes are regulated.

Contact: Krista Conger
kristac@stanford.edu
650-725-5371
Stanford University Medical Center

Public Release: 19-Nov-2014
Neuroscience 2014
Lumosity study examines lifestyle effects on cognitive training at Neuroscience 2014
A study analyzed over 60 million data points from 61,407 participants and found that memory, speed, and flexibility tasks peaked in the morning, while crystallized knowledge tasks such as arithmetic and verbal fluency peaked in the afternoon. Overall, they found that game performance for most games was highest after seven hours of sleep and with positive moods.

Contact: Melissa Malski
mmalski@lumoslabs.com
570-498-9018
Lumosity

Public Release: 19-Nov-2014
PLOS ONE
Florida harvester ants regularly relocate
Florida harvester ants move and construct a similar subterranean nest about once a year.

Contact: Kayla Graham
onepress@plos.org
PLOS

Public Release: 19-Nov-2014
PLOS ONE
Endangered green turtles may feed, reside at Peru's central, northern coast
Peruvian coastal waters may provide suitable habitat that may help the recovery of endangered South Pacific green turtles.

Contact: Kayla Graham
onepress@plos.org
PLOS

Public Release: 19-Nov-2014
EvoDevo
Ancient genetic program employed in more than just fins and limbs
Researchers at San Francisco State University have found that the Hox gene program, responsible for directing the development of fins and limbs, is also utilized to develop other body part features of vertebrates, such as barbels and vents in fish. The research indicates that this genetic program, which dates back at least 440-480 million years, is older and more widely utilized than previously thought.

Contact: Jonathan Morales
jmm1@sfsu.edu
415-338-1743
San Francisco State University

Public Release: 19-Nov-2014
American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2014
New app aims for rapid interventions and reduced mortality for infants with heart defects
A powerful new app is directly connecting single ventricle heart defect patients to their doctors, dramatically improving their monitoring while they recover from heart surgery at home. The tablet-based app is a more automated, accurate and simplified way for physicians to monitor these high-risk patients at home in real-time. The aim of the app is to enable quick intervention at signs of danger, reduce the mortality rate, and decrease the burden placed on at-home caregivers.
Claire Giannini Fund, Heart to Heart Network Inc.

Contact: Jake Jacobson
jajacobson@cmh.edu
913-406-2060
Children's Mercy Hospital

Showing releases 226-250 out of 539.

<< < 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 > >>