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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 226-250 out of 402.

<< < 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 > >>

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
The Journal of Neuroscience
Gene inhibitor, salmon fibrin restore function lost in spinal cord injury
A therapy combining salmon fibrin injections into the spinal cord and injections of a gene inhibitor into the brain restored voluntary motor function impaired by spinal cord injury, scientists at UC Irvine's Reeve-Irvine Research Center have found.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Tom Vasich
tmvasich@uci.edu
949-824-6455
University of California - Irvine

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
Satellite shows Atlantic tropical depression degenerate
NOAA's GOES-East satellite captured imagery of the Atlantic Ocean's Tropical Depression 2 is it degenerated into a tropical wave on July 23.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
Psychological Science
Sleep deprivation may increase susceptibility to false memories
Not getting enough sleep may increase the likelihood of forming false memories, according to research published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.

Contact: Anna Mikulak
amikulak@psychologicalscience.org
202-293-9300
Association for Psychological Science

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
Trends in Parasitology
Diseases of another kind
Sapronoses are an infectious diseases caused by pathogenic microorganisms that inhabit aquatic ecosystems and/or soil rather than a living host.

Contact: Julie Cohen
julie.cohen@ucsb.edu
805-893-7220
University of California - Santa Barbara

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
Conservation Biology
York University researchers use bird 'backpacks' to put wood thrushes migration on the map
Researchers from York University have created the first migratory connectivity map produced for a songbird, using tracking from both breeding and winter sites. They were able to trace the route taken by wood thrushes from North America using bird 'backpacks.' They discovered that wood thrushes from Canada don't migrate to the same areas as their southern neighbours, and actually have a longer migratory route. The map will help identify specific areas for habitat protection.

Contact: Robin Heron
rheron@yorku.ca
416-736-2100 x22097
York University

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
ETH student develops filter for clean water around the world
An innovative filter makes it possible to purify water more quickly, simply and economically than ever before. The developers hope the device will soon play a big role development aid, and they are looking for investors to help them achieve this goal.

Contact: Media Releations ETH Zurich
mediareleations@hk.ethz.ch
41-446-324-141
ETH Zurich

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
Biodiversity Data Journal
Dead-body-feeding larvae useful in forensic investigations
Non-biting blow fly Chrysomya megacephala is commonly found in dead bodies and is used in forensic investigations to determine the time of death, referred to as the post mortem interval. A report of synanthropic derived form of C. megacephala from Tamil Nadu is provided for the first time based on morphological features and molecular characterization through generation of DNA barcoding. This study, significant in forensic investigations was published in the open-access Biodiversity Data Journal.

Contact: Dr. S. Janarthanan
janas_09@yahoo.co.in
Pensoft Publishers

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
Geophysical Research-Solid Earth
This week from AGU: New Oso report, rockfall in Yosemite, and earthquake models
This week from AGU: Oso landslide report, reducing rockfall in Yosemite National Park, and a new earthquake model.

Contact: Alexandra Branscombe
abranscombe@agu.org
202-777-7516
American Geophysical Union

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
Leadership Quarterly
Wide-faced men negotiate nearly $2,200 larger signing bonus
Having a wider face helps men when they negotiate for themselves but hurts them when they are negotiating in a situation that requires compromise. Additionally, men who are more attractive are better collaborators compared to less attractive men.

Contact: Sean Nealon
sean.nealon@ucr.edu
951-827-1287
University of California - Riverside

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
Astrophysical Journal
AGU: Voyager spacecraft might not have reached interstellar space
In 2012, the Voyager mission team announced that the Voyager 1 spacecraft had passed into interstellar space, traveling further from Earth than any other manmade object. But, in the nearly two years since that historic announcement, and despite subsequent observations backing it up, uncertainty about whether Voyager 1 really crossed the threshold continues.

Contact: Peter Weiss
pweiss@agu.org
202-777-5235
American Geophysical Union

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
Nature Climate Change
Climate change and the soil
The planet's soil releases about 60 billion tons of carbon into the atmosphere each year, which is far more than that released by burning fossil fuels. Short-term warming studies have documented that rising temperatures increase the rate of soil respiration. As a result, scientists have worried that global warming would accelerate the decomposition of carbon in the soil, releasing more carbon dioxide into the atmosphere and accelerating global warming.
National Science Foundation, College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources at the University of Hawaii at Manoa, United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service, Carnegie Institution for Science

Contact: Greg Asner
gpa@carnegiescience.edu
650-380-2828
Carnegie Institution

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
Nature
Strategy proposed for preventing diseases of aging
Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and elsewhere argue that medicine focuses too much on fighting diseases individually instead of concentrating on interventions that prevent multiple chronic diseases and extend healthy lifespan. They call for moving forward with strategies that have been shown to delay aging in animals. In addition to promoting a healthy diet and regular exercise, these strategies include manipulating molecular pathways that slow aging and promote healthy longevity.

Contact: Jim Dryden
jdryden@wustl.edu
314-286-0110
Washington University School of Medicine

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
Annals of Emergency Medicine
Ketamine can be a wonder drug for ER patients and their physicians
For critically ill patients arriving at the emergency department, the drug ketamine can safely provide analgesia, sedation and amnesia for rapid, life-saving intubation, despite decades-old studies that suggested it raised intracranial pressure. The results of a systematic review of 10 recent studies of what many emergency physicians regard as a 'wonder drug' are published online in Annals of Emergency Medicine.

Contact: Julie Lloyd
jlloyd@acep.org
202-370-9292
American College of Emergency Physicians

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
Nature
The birth of topological spintronics
The discovery of a new material combination that could lead to a more efficient approach to computer memory and logic is the first promising indication that it may be possible to build a practical technology with a novel material known as a 'topological insulator.' The research team's results show that such a scheme can be 10 times more efficient for controlling magnetic memory or logic than any other combination of materials measured to date.
Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, Office of Naval Research, MARCO, National Science Foundation

Contact: Barbara K. Kennedy
science@psu.edu
814-863-4682
Penn State

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
Calcification in changing oceans explored in special issue of the Biological Bulletin
The July issue of the Biological Bulletin, published by the Marine Biological Laboratory, addresses the challenges faced by calcifiers -- organisms that use calcium from their environment to create hard carbonate skeletons and shells for stability and protection -- as ocean composition changes worldwide.

Contact: Gina Hebert
ghebert@mbl.edu
508-289-7725
Marine Biological Laboratory

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Research charts the ecological impact of microbial respiration in the oxygen-starved ocean
A sulfur-oxidizing bacterial group called SUP05 will play an increasingly important role in carbon and nutrient cycling in the world's oceans as oxygen minimum zones expand, according to research published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Contact: Chris Balma
balma@science.ubc.ca
604-822-5082
University of British Columbia

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
Stem Cells and Development
New method for reducing tumorigenicity in induced pluripotent stem-cell based therapies
The potential for clinical use of induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology for transplant-based therapeutic strategies has previously been hindered by the risk of dysregulated cell growth, specifically the development of tumors.

Contact: Kathryn Ruehle
kruehle@liebertpub.com
914-740-2100
Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
Environmental and Experimental Botany
An increase in temperature by 2050 may be advantageous to the growth of forage plants
A 2°C increase in temperature around the world by 2050, according to one of the scenarios predicted by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, may be advantageous to the physiology and the biochemical and biophysical processes involved in the growth of forage plants such as Stylosanthes capitata Vogel, a legume utilized for livestock grazing in tropical countries such as Brazil.
São Paulo Research Foundation

Contact: Samuel Antenor
samuel@fapesp.br
55-113-838-4381
Fundação de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
PLOS ONE
Urban heat boosts some pest populations 200-fold, killing red maples
New research shows that urban 'heat islands' are slowly killing red maples in the southeastern United States. One factor is that researchers have found warmer temperatures increase the number of young produced by the gloomy scale insect -- a significant tree pest -- by 300 percent, which in turn leads to 200 times more adult gloomy scales on urban trees.
Department of the Interior's Southeast Climate Science Center, US Department of Agriculture's National Institute of Food and Agriculture

Contact: Matt Shipman
matt_shipman@ncsu.edu
919-515-6386
North Carolina State University

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
Astrophysical Journal
A new approach in the search for extraterrestrial intelligence: targeting alien polluters
Humanity is on the threshold of being able to detect signs of alien life on other worlds. By studying exoplanet atmospheres, we can look for gases like oxygen and methane that only coexist if replenished by life. But those gases come from simple life forms like microbes. What about advanced civilizations? Would they leave any detectable signs? They might, if they spew industrial pollution into the atmosphere.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Christine Pulliam
cpulliam@cfa.harvard.edu
617-495-7463
Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
Detecting concussion-related brain disease in its earliest stages
Autopsies have shown that some high-profile athletes who suffered repeated blows to the head during their careers have unusual protein clumps in their brains. Those clumps suggest the athletes had a disease called chronic traumatic encephalopathy. Now, scientists are working on tests that might be able to detect CTE in its earliest stages, according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News, the weekly news magazine of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
Nature Communications
Researchers unlock the protein puzzle
By using brightly hued dyes, George Mason University researchers discovered an innovative way to reveal where proteins touch each other, possibly leading to new treatments for cancer, arthritis, heart disease and even lung disease.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Michele McDonald
mmcdon15@gmu.edu
703-993-8781
George Mason University

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry
Rosemary and oregano contain diabetes-fighting compounds
The popular culinary herbs oregano and rosemary are packed with healthful compounds, and now lab tests show they could work in much the same way as prescription anti-diabetic medication, scientists report. In their new study published in the American Chemical Society's Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, they found that how the herbs are grown makes a difference, and they also identified which compounds contribute the most to this promising trait.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
Nature Communications
Nano-sized chip 'sniffs out' explosives far better than trained dogs
A groundbreaking nanotechnology-inspired sensor devised by Tel Aviv University's Professor Fernando Patolsky picks up the scent of explosives molecules better than a detection dog's nose. The device is mobile, inexpensive, and highly accurate, detecting explosives in the air at concentrations as low as a few molecules per 1,000 trillion.
Tracense

Contact: George Hunka
ghunka@aftau.org
212-742-9070
American Friends of Tel Aviv University

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
Environmental Science and Technology
The geography of the global electronic waste ('e-waste') burden
As local and national governments struggle to deal with ever-growing piles of electronic waste, scientists are now refining the picture of just how much there is and where it really ends up. Published in the ACS journal Environmental Science & Technology, their study found that nearly a quarter of e-waste that developed countries discard floods into just seven developing countries -- with major potential health risks for the people who live there.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Showing releases 226-250 out of 402.

<< < 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 > >>