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Showing releases 226-250 out of 409.

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Public Release: 16-Apr-2014
Science Translational Medicine
Celldex's Phase 1 study of CDX-1401 published in Science Translational Medicine
Celldex Therapeutics Inc. announced today that final data from its Phase 1 study of CDX-1401 in solid tumors, including long-term patient follow-up, have been published in Science Translational Medicine. The data demonstrate robust antibody and T cell responses and evidence of clinical benefit in patients with very advanced cancers and suggest that CDX-1401 may predispose patients to better outcomes on subsequent therapy with checkpoint inhibitors.

Contact: Sarah Cavanaugh
scavanaugh@celldex.com
508-864-8337
Celldex Therapeutics

Public Release: 16-Apr-2014
PLOS ONE
In funk music, rhythmic complexity influences dancing desire
Rhythmic drum patterns with a balance of rhythmic predictability and complexity may influence our desire to dance and enjoy the music.

Contact: Kayla Graham
onepress@plos.org
415-590-3558
PLOS

Public Release: 16-Apr-2014
PLOS ONE
Chimpanzees prefer firm, stable beds
Chimpanzees may select a certain type of wood, Ugandan ironwood, over other options for its firm, stable, and resilient properties to make their bed.

Contact: Kayla Graham
onepress@plos.org
415-590-3558
PLOS

Public Release: 16-Apr-2014
Neuron
Scientists explain how memories stick together
Scientists at the Salk Institute have created a new model of memory that explains how neurons retain select memories a few hours after an event. This new framework provides a more complete picture of how memory works, which can inform research into disorders liked Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, post-traumatic stress and learning disabilities.

Contact: Chris Emery
Cemery@salk.edu
301-873-6952
Salk Institute

Public Release: 16-Apr-2014
Neurology
In old age, lack of emotion and interest may signal your brain is shrinking
Older people who have apathy but not depression may have smaller brain volumes than those without apathy, according to a new study published in the April 16, 2014, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. Apathy is a lack of interest or emotion.

Contact: Rachel Seroka
rseroka@aan.com
612-928-6129
American Academy of Neurology

Public Release: 15-Apr-2014
Angewandte Chemie International Edition
Breakthrough points to new drugs from nature
Researchers at Griffith University's Eskitis Institute have developed a new technique for discovering natural compounds which could form the basis of novel therapeutic drugs.

Contact: Helen Wright
helen.wright@griffith.edu.au
047-840-6565
Griffith University

Public Release: 15-Apr-2014
Nano Letters
Relieving electric vehicle range anxiety with improved batteries
A new, PNNL-developed nanomaterial called a metal organic framework could extend the lifespan of lithium-sulfur batteries, which could be used to increase the driving range of electric vehicles.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Franny White
franny.white@pnnl.gov
509-375-6904
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 15-Apr-2014
Western Birds
Irrigated agriculture -- precious habitat for the long-billed curlew
Despite the recent rainfall, California is still in a drought, so not only are water supplies limited, but demand for water is increasing from a variety of uses. In a recent study published by Point Blue Conservation Science (Point Blue) and Audubon California in the journal Western Birds, scientists document the importance of irrigated agricultural crops in California's Central Valley to a conspicuous shorebird.

Contact: Melissa Pitkin
mpitkin@pointblue.org
831-423-8202
Point Blue Conservation Science

Public Release: 15-Apr-2014
PLOS ONE
Using video surveillance to measure peoples' hand washing habits
Stanford researchers pioneer use of video surveillance to better understand essential hygiene behavior.

Contact: Rob Jordan
rjordan@stanford.edu
650-721-1881
Stanford University

Public Release: 15-Apr-2014
Journal of Biomedical Nanotechnology
UT Arlington physicist creates new nanoparticle for cancer therapy
In a newly published paper, a University of Texas at Arlington physicist describes a newly created complex that may make photodynamic therapy for cancer treatment more efficient and cost effective and effective against deep tissue cancers.
Department of Defense Congressionally Directed Medical Research Programs

Contact: Traci Peterson
tpeterso@uta.edu
817-521-5494
University of Texas at Arlington

Public Release: 15-Apr-2014
Journal of Heredity
Diverse gene pool critical for tigers' survival, say Stanford scholars
Increasing tigers' genetic diversity -- via interbreeding and other methods -- and not just their population numbers may be the best solution to saving this endangered species, according to Stanford research.

Contact: Rob Jordan
rjordan@stanford.edu
650-721-1881
Stanford University

Public Release: 15-Apr-2014
Geosphere
New Geosphere series: The St. Elias Erosion/Tectonics Project in Southern Alaska
GEOSPHERE has added a new themed issue to its roster: 'Neogene tectonics and climate-tectonic interactions in the southern Alaskan orogeny.' Interest in Alaskan tectonics has varied over time, propelled mostly by geologic hazards. In 1964, the great Alaskan earthquake focused attention on Alaska and was a major factor in the establishment of the concept of subduction in the early days of plate tectonics.

Contact: Kea Giles
kgiles@geosociety.org
Geological Society of America

Public Release: 15-Apr-2014
Astrobiology
Odd tilts could make more worlds habitable
Pivoting planets that lean one way and then change orientation within a short geological time period might be surprisingly habitable, according to new modeling by NASA and university scientists affiliated with the NASA Astrobiology Institute.
NASA

Contact: Liz Zubritsky
Elizabeth.a.zubritsky@nasa.gov
301-614-5438
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 15-Apr-2014
Advanced Materials
Repeated self-healing now possible in composite materials
Researchers at the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have created a 3-D vascular system that allows for high-performance composite materials such as fiberglass to heal autonomously, and repeatedly.
Air Force Office of Scientific Research, US Army Research Laboratory, and others

Contact: August Cassens
acassens@illinois.edu
217-300-4181
Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology

Public Release: 15-Apr-2014
American Journal of Botany
The human food connection: A new study reveals more about our relationship to food
Tucked away in Hartford, Conn., a Puerto Rican community is creating a tropical home away from home through cuisine that is so authentic it has caught the attention of scientists. David W. Taylor (University of Portland) and Gregory J. Anderson (University of Connecticut) took a close look at the fresh crops in the Puerto Rican markets of Hartford and uncovered evidence that gives new meaning to a phrase that food lovers have been using for years: home is in the kitchen.

Contact: Richard Hund
rhund@botany.org
314-577-9557
American Journal of Botany

Public Release: 15-Apr-2014
The Journals of Gerontology, Series A: Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences
Scholars propose new standards for gauging muscle decline in older adults
Sarcopenia -- the age-related loss of muscle mass and strength -- may put up to 50 percent of seniors at greater risk for disability, yet there is no consensus within the medical community for how this condition should be measured. However, a new collection of articles appearing in the Journals of Gerontology, Series A: Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences lays out an empirically derived set of criteria for diagnosing sarcopenia.

Contact: Todd Kluss
tkluss@geron.org
202-587-2839
The Gerontological Society of America

Public Release: 15-Apr-2014
The Plant Cell
New technique will accelerate genetic characterization of photosynthesis
Photosynthesis provides fixed carbon and energy for nearly all life on Earth, yet many aspects of this fascinating process remain mysterious. We do not know the full list of the parts of the molecular machines that perform photosynthesis in any organism. A team developed a highly sophisticated tool that will transform the work of plant geneticists on this subject.

Contact: Martin Jonikas
mjonikas@carnegiescience.edu
650-325-1521 x216
Carnegie Institution

Public Release: 15-Apr-2014
eLife
Drought hormones measured
Floods and droughts are increasingly in the news, and climate experts say their frequency will only go up in the future. As such, it is crucial for scientists to learn more about how these extreme events affect plants in order to prepare for and combat the risks to food security that could result. New work from Carnegie could help bring about breakthrough findings on that front.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Wolf Frommer
wfrommer@carnegiescience.edu
650-325-1521 x208
Carnegie Institution

Public Release: 15-Apr-2014
Annals of Internal Medicine
Pre-diabetes and diabetes nearly double over the past 2 decades
Cases of diabetes and pre-diabetes in the United States have nearly doubled since 1988, suggests new research from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, with obesity apparently to blame for the surge. The researchers also found that the burden of the disease has not hit all groups equally, with alarming increases in diabetes in blacks, Hispanics and the elderly.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Susan Sperry
ssperry1@jhu.edu
410-955-6919
Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health

Public Release: 15-Apr-2014
Pediatrics
Study: SSRI use during pregnancy associated with autism and developmental delays in boys
In a study of nearly 1,000 mother-child pairs, researchers from the Bloomberg School of Public health found that prenatal exposure to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), a frequently prescribed treatment for depression, anxiety and other disorders, was associated with autism spectrum disorder and developmental delays in boys.
NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences

Contact: Susan Sperry
ssperry1@jhu.edu
410-955-6919
Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health

Public Release: 15-Apr-2014
Nature Communications
Long-term predictions for Miami sea level rise could be available relatively soon
Miami could know as early as 2020 how high sea levels will rise into the next century, according to a team of researchers including Florida International University scientist Rene Price.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Cheryl Dybas
cdybas@nsf.gov
703-292-7734
National Science Foundation

Public Release: 15-Apr-2014
Nature Chemical Biology
Potent, puzzling and (now less) toxic: Team discovers how antifungal drug works
Scientists have solved a decades-old medical mystery -- and in the process have found a potentially less toxic way to fight invasive fungal infections, which kill about 1.5 million people a year. The researchers say they now understand the mechanism of action of amphotericin, an antifungal drug that has been in use for more than 50 years -- even though it is nearly as toxic to human cells as it is to the microbes it attacks.
National Institutes of Health, Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Contact: Diana Yates
diya@illinois.edu
217-333-5802
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Public Release: 15-Apr-2014
American Journal of Industrial Medicine
Changes in processing, handling could reduce commercial fishing injuries
Handling frozen fish caused nearly half of all injuries aboard commercial freezer-trawlers and about a quarter of the injuries on freezer-longliner vessels operating off the coast of Alaska. Many injuries could be prevented with the right interventions.

Contact: Devin Lucas
dlucas@cdc.gov
907-271-2386
Oregon State University

Public Release: 15-Apr-2014
Astrobiology
Astronomers: 'Tilt-a-worlds' could harbor life
A fluctuating tilt in a planet's orbit does not preclude the possibility of life, according to new research by astronomers at the University of Washington, Utah's Weber State University and NASA. In fact, sometimes it helps.
NASA Astrobiology Institute

Contact: Peter Kelley
kellep@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 15-Apr-2014
Stem Cell Research & Therapy
UCI study finds modified stem cells offer potential pathway to treat Alzheimer's disease
UC Irvine neurobiologists have found that genetically modified neural stem cells show positive results when transplanted into the brains of mice with the symptoms and pathology of Alzheimer's disease. The pre-clinical trial is published in the journal Stem Cells Research and Therapy, and the approach has been shown to work in two different mouse models.
California Institute for Regenerative Medicine

Contact: Tom Vasich
tmvasich@uci.edu
949-824-6455
University of California - Irvine

Showing releases 226-250 out of 409.

<< < 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 > >>