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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 226-250 out of 356.

<< < 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 > >>

Public Release: 16-Aug-2014
2014 American Sociological Association Annual Meeting
'Getting-by girls' straddle gap between academic winners and losers
Everyone notices the academic superstars and failures, but what about the tens of millions of American teens straddling these two extremes? A new study from the University of California, Berkeley, has spotlighted a high school subculture that has made an art of slacking -- even with ample educational resources -- and may be destined to perpetuate the nation's struggling lower-middle class.

Contact: Yasmin Anwar
yanwar@berkeley.edu
510-643-7944
University of California - Berkeley

Public Release: 16-Aug-2014
2014 American Sociological Association Annual Meeting
Disconnect between parenting and certain jobs a source of stress, study finds
Some working parents are carrying more psychological baggage than others -- and the reason has nothing to do with demands on their time and energy. The cause is their occupation.

Contact: Daniel Fowler
pubinfo@asanet.org
202-527-7885
American Sociological Association

Public Release: 16-Aug-2014
2014 American Sociological Association Annual Meeting
Peers, but not peer pressure, key to prescription drug misuse among young adults
Current efforts to prevent prescription drug misuse among young adults need to consider peers -- but not peer pressure -- according to a Purdue University study.

Contact: Daniel Fowler
pubinfo@asanet.org
202-527-7885
American Sociological Association

Public Release: 16-Aug-2014
2014 American Sociological Association Annual Meeting
Parental incarceration can be worse for a child than divorce or death of a parent
With more than 2 million people behind bars, the US has the highest incarceration rate in the world. This mass incarceration has serious implications for not only the inmates, but their children, finds a new University of California-Irvine study.

Contact: Daniel Fowler
pubinfo@asanet.org
202-527-7885
American Sociological Association

Public Release: 16-Aug-2014
2014 American Sociological Association Annual Meeting
For men in pink-collar jobs, a tradeoff: Lower pay, more job security
Is a man without a four-year college degree better off trying to land a well-paying but insecure job in traditionally male fields such as manufacturing or construction, or should he consider lower-paying but steadier employment in a female-dominated field?

Contact: Daniel Fowler
pubinfo@asanet.org
202-527-7885
American Sociological Association

Public Release: 16-Aug-2014
2014 American Sociological Association Annual Meeting
Middle-aged women missing passion (and sex) seek affairs, not divorce
When middle-aged women seek extra-marital affairs, they are looking for more romantic passion, which includes sex -- and don't want to divorce their husbands, suggests new research to be presented at the 109th Annual Meeting of the American Sociological Association.

Contact: Daniel Fowler
pubinfo@asanet.org
202-527-7885
American Sociological Association

Public Release: 16-Aug-2014
2014 American Sociological Association Annual Meeting
Study identifies factors that contribute to food trucks' fast spread
Gourmet food trucks have spread around the nation, according to researchers from the University of Michigan and Northwestern University who harvested Twitter data to conduct a de facto census of up-scale US food trucks, invented in Los Angeles in 2008.

Contact: Diane Swanbrow
swanbrow@umich.edu
734-395-4323
University of Michigan

Public Release: 15-Aug-2014
American Journal of Public Health
Stronger drunk driving laws lead to safer roads: Study
Changes to British Columbia's laws against driving while impaired have reduced fatal crashes as well as ambulance calls and hospital admissions resulting from motor vehicle crashes, a new University of British Columbia study finds.

Contact: Brian Murphy
brian.murphy@ubc.ca
604-822-2048
University of British Columbia

Public Release: 15-Aug-2014
EcoHealth 2014
EcoHealth
Environment and health experts commit to actions on climate change
More than 500 delegates to the EcoHealth 2014 conference have issued a call to action to urgently and collaboratively address the impacts of climate change on the health of humans, animals and the global environment in light of the lack of a truly collective response to date.
International Development Research Centre - Canada

Contact: Daphnée Champagne
ecohealth2014partners@gmail.com
EcoHealth 2014

Public Release: 15-Aug-2014
Journal of Parkinson's Disease
Depression often untreated in Parkinson's disease
Depression is known to be a common symptom of Parkinson's disease, but remains untreated for many patients, according to a new study by Northwestern Medicine.

Contact: Erin White
ewhite@northwestern.edu
847-491-4888
Northwestern University

Public Release: 15-Aug-2014
American Journal of Botany
Utility of sequence-related amplified polymorphism (SRAP) markers
Sequence-related amplified polymorphism markers have proved to be useful for agronomic studies (including crop development and identification of pathogen-resistant markers), but their use in other fields of plant biology has been limited. A new study in Applications in Plant Sciences surveys the SRAP literature and makes a case for the potential use of SRAP markers across a broad range of research fields including plant systematics, biogeography, conservation, and ecology.

Contact: Beth Parada
apps@botany.org
American Journal of Botany

Public Release: 15-Aug-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Credit allocation among researchers determined by new algorithm
A new algorithm developed at Northeastern's Center for Complex Network Research may help to accurately allocate credit to authors on multi-author papers across disciplines.

Contact: Emily Bhatti
e.bhatti@neu.edu
617-373-3287
Northeastern University

Public Release: 15-Aug-2014
Science
Scientists discover interstellar stardust
Scientists have been examining stardust collected from the Stardust Interstellar Dust Collector, and have determined seven dust particles come from outside our solar system.

Contact: Emily Waldren
ewaldren@fieldmuseum.org
312-665-7107
Field Museum

Public Release: 15-Aug-2014
BioEssays
Do gut bacteria rule our minds?
It sounds like science fiction, but it seems that bacteria within us -- which outnumber our own cells about 100-fold -- may very well be affecting both our cravings and moods to get us to eat what they want, and often are driving us toward obesity.
National Institutes of Health, American Cancer Society, Bonnie D. Addario Lung Cancer Foundation, Institute for Advanced Study

Contact: Jeffrey Norris
jeffrey.norris@ucsf.edu
415-502-6397
University of California - San Francisco

Public Release: 15-Aug-2014
BMJ Open
Charges for blood tests vary across California hospitals
New UC San Francisco research shows significant price differences for ten common blood tests in California hospitals, with some patients charged as little as $10 for one test while others were charged $10,169 for the identical test.
National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Physician Faculty Scholars Program, UCSF Center for Healthcare Value

Contact: Elizabeth Fernandez
elizabeth.fernandez@ucsf.edu
415-502-6397
University of California - San Francisco

Public Release: 15-Aug-2014
Science
'Science' features PRB, WSU, DMC advances in preterm birth
The Aug. 15 edition of the prestigious journal Science features a major article about the most important problem in obstetrics: preterm labor. The article, 'Preterm labor: one syndrome, many causes,' delivers a powerful message: preterm birth is not one condition, but many, and provides a framework for meeting this challenge.

Contact: Julie O'Connor
julie.oconnor@wayne.edu
313-577-8845
Wayne State University - Office of the Vice President for Research

Public Release: 15-Aug-2014
NASA sees no punch left in Tropical Storm Julio
Tropical Storm Julio doesn't have any strong thunderstorms or strong convection left in it according to infrared satellite imagery from NASA.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 15-Aug-2014
NASA satellite spots a weakening Karina, now a tropical storm
NASA's Terra satellite passed over Hurricane Karina before it weakened to a tropical storm early on Aug. 15 and imagery showed the vertical wind shear was already taking its toll.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 15-Aug-2014
Psychological Science
Visual exposure predicts infants' ability to follow another's gaze
Following another person's gaze can reveal a wealth of information critical to social interactions and also to safety. Gaze following typically emerges in infancy, and new research looking at preterm infants suggests that it's visual experience, not maturational age, that underlies this critical ability.
Fondo Nacional de Desarrollo Científico y Tecnológico, La Comisión Nacional de Investigación Científica y Tecnológica, Chile

Contact: Anna Mikulak
amikulak@psychologicalscience.org
202-293-9300
Association for Psychological Science

Public Release: 15-Aug-2014
Brain Injury
Stroke researchers link ability to self-administer medication with memory loss
Stroke researchers have identified an association between over-optimistic estimation of the ability to take medications accurately and memory loss among stroke survivors. Results indicate that assessing patients for their ability to estimate medication skills may predict memory disorder. 'Stroke survivors over-estimate their medication self-administration ability (MSA), predicting memory loss,' was epublished May 28 by Brain Injury. Screening stroke survivors for medication self-administration ability may be a useful approach to identifying memory deficits that contribute to poor outcomes.
National Institutes of Health, Kessler Foundation

Contact: Carolann Murphy
cmurphy@KesslerFoundation.org
973-324-8382
Kessler Foundation

Public Release: 15-Aug-2014
Anesthesia & Analgesia
Low vitamin D levels linked to increased risks after noncardiac surgery
Patients with low blood levels of vitamin D are at increased risk of death and serious complications after noncardiac surgery, suggests a study in Anesthesia & Analgesia.

Contact: Nancy Lynly
nlynly@iars.org
415-296-6907
Wolters Kluwer Health

Public Release: 15-Aug-2014
Journal of Experimental Biology
Bats bolster brain hypothesis, maybe technology, too
Decades of research on how bats use echolocation to keep a focus on their targets not only lends support to a long debated neuroscience hypothesis about vision but also could lead to smarter sonar and radar technologies.
Office of Naval Research, National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, NASA, Brown Institute for Brain Science

Contact: David Orenstein
david_orenstein@brown.edu
401-863-1862
Brown University

Public Release: 15-Aug-2014
Scientific Reports
On the edge of graphene
Researchers at the National Physical Laboratory have discovered that the conductivity at the edges of graphene devices is different to that of the central material.

Contact: Joseph Meaney
joe@proofcommunication.com
44-787-546-9309
National Physical Laboratory

Public Release: 15-Aug-2014
GNU Hackers' Meeting 2014
TUM researchers develop defense against cyberattacks
A group of journalists has reported the existence of the 'Hacienda' spy program. According to this report, five western intelligence agencies are using the Hacienda software to identify vulnerable servers across the world in order to control them and use them for their own purposes. Scientists at the Technische Universität München have developed free software that can help prevent this kind of identification and thus the subsequent capture of systems.
Deutsche-Forschungs-Gemeinschaft

Contact: Stefanie Reiffert
reiffert@zv.tum.de
Technische Universitaet Muenchen

Public Release: 15-Aug-2014
5th Lindau Meeting on Economic Sciences
Incentives, innovation and growth
Over the past decades, the economic sciences have seen fundamental breakthroughs in our understanding of human responses to incentives in the face of uncertainty and strategic interactions. But what is the scope and what are the limits for applying these models in the design of better institutions and better policies? And to what extent can they teach us what is needed to encourage the innovation that drives economic growth and social well-being?

Contact: Christian Schumacher
christian.schumacher@lindau-nobel.org
49-838-227-73115
Lindau Meeting of Nobel Laureates

Showing releases 226-250 out of 356.

<< < 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 > >>