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Showing releases 26-50 out of 349.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 > >>

Public Release: 31-Jul-2014
Science Translational Medicine
Hope for the overweight
The body has different types of adipose tissue that perform various metabolic tasks: white, beige and brown. For the first time, researchers at the Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen and Harvard Medical School have successfully identified specific surface proteins that can help distinguish between the three types. This discovery makes it possible to develop new treatment options for adiposity. The work has been published in Science Translational Medicine.

Contact: Dr. Siegfried Ussar
siegfried.ussar@helmholtz-muenchen.de
49-893-187-2047
Helmholtz Zentrum München - German Research Center for Environmental Health

Public Release: 31-Jul-2014
Unmanned Systems
Singing the same tune: Scientists develop novel ways of separating birdsong sources
Researchers at the University of California, Los Angeles, and the Chinese Academy of Sciences have pioneered a new study that could greatly improve current methods of localizing birdsong data.

Contact: Jason CJ Lim
cjlim@wspc.com.sg
65-646-65775 x247
World Scientific

Public Release: 31-Jul-2014
99th Annual Meeting of the Ecological Society of America
Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment
The Rim Fire 1 year later: A natural experiment in fire ecology and management
The 2013 California Rim Fire crossed management boundaries when it burned out of the Stanislaus National Forest and into to Yosemite National Park, providing a natural demonstration of the effects of a history of fire suppression on wildfire dynamics.

Contact: Liza Lester
llester@esa.org
202-833-8773 x211
Ecological Society of America

Public Release: 31-Jul-2014
ChemBioChem
Engineering a protein to prevent brain damage from toxic agents
New research may help prevent brain damage for those exposed to pesticides and chemical weapons. The work centers on proteins called phosphotriesterases, which are able to degrade chemicals known as organophosphates -- found in everything from industrial pesticides to sarin gas. They permanently bond to neurotransmitters in the brain, interfering with their ability to function and causing irreversible damage. The researchers re-engineered the protein to make it sufficiently stable to be used therapeutically.
US Army Research Office, National Science Foundation

Contact: Kathleen Hamilton
kathleen.hamilton@nyu.edu
718-260-3792
New York University Polytechnic School of Engineering

Public Release: 31-Jul-2014
PLOS ONE
New international tree nut council study looks at nuts, diabetes and metabolic syndrome
Tree nuts have a positive impact on glycemic control in diabetes and on metabolic syndrome criteria.

Contact: Maureen Ternus
maureen.ternus@gmail.com
530-297-5895
Motion PR

Public Release: 31-Jul-2014
Armed Forces & Society
Women in military less likely to drink than civilian women
While it is known that members of the US military overall are more likely to use alcohol, a new study finds that female enlistees and female veterans are actually less likely to drink than their civilian counterparts. This study was published today in Armed Forces & Society, a SAGE journal published on behalf of the Inter-University Seminar on Armed Forces and Society.

Contact: Camille Gamboa
camille.gamboa@sagepub.com
SAGE Publications

Public Release: 31-Jul-2014
Chemical Communications
Chemists demonstrate 'bricks-and-mortar' assembly of new molecular structures
Chemists at Indiana University Bloomington have described the self-assembly of large, symmetrical molecules in bricks-and-mortar fashion, a development with potential value for the field of organic electronic devices such as field-effect transistors and photovoltaic cells.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy

Contact: Steve Hinnefeld
slhinnef@iu.edu
812-856-3488
Indiana University

Public Release: 31-Jul-2014
Scientific Reports
Boat noise impacts development and survival of sea hares
The development and survival of an important group of marine invertebrates known as sea hares is under threat from increasing boat noise in the world's oceans, according to a new study by researchers from the UK and France.

Contact: Hannah Johnson
hannah.johnson@bristol.ac.uk
44-117-928-8896
University of Bristol

Public Release: 31-Jul-2014
Nature Communications
U-M researchers find protein that fuels repair of treatment-resistant cancer cells
Imagine you're fighting for your life but no matter how hard you hit, your opponent won't go down.

Contact: Laura Bailey
baileylm@umich.edu
734-647-1848
University of Michigan

Public Release: 31-Jul-2014
28th AAAI Conference on Artificial Intelligence
Research proves there is power in numbers to reduce electricity bills
Consumers can save money on their electricity bills and negotiate better deals by joining forces with similar groups of customers to switch energy suppliers according to new research.

Contact: Lynne Veitch
lynne.veitch@pagodapr.com
44-131-556-0770
Heriot-Watt University

Public Release: 31-Jul-2014
Cell Death & Disease
A new way to generate insulin-producing cells in Type 1 diabetes
Researchers discover a simple peptide that can induce new beta-cell formation in the pancreas. The findings show promise for a new approach to treating Type 1 diabetes.
California Institute for Regenerative Medicine

Contact: Susan Gammon
sgammon@sanfordburnham.org
858-795-5012
Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute

Public Release: 31-Jul-2014
New England Journal of Medicine
Transplantation shown to be highly effective in treating immune deficiency in children
Babies who are born with severe combined immunodeficiency can be successfully treated with a transplant of blood-forming stem cells, according to experts led by Memorial Sloan Kettering's Richard J. O'Reilly, M.D.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Courtney DeNicola Nowak
denicolc@mskcc.org
212-639-3573
Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center

Public Release: 31-Jul-2014
American Journal of Preventive Medicine
Veterans' alcohol problems linked to stress on the home front
Regardless of traumatic events experienced during deployment, returning National Guard soldiers were more likely to develop a drinking problem if faced with civilian life setbacks, including job loss, legal problems, divorce, and serious financial and legal problems -- all commonplace in military families. Results of the study by researchers at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health are published online in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.
US Department of Defense, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Angela J. Beck
ajpmmedia@elsevier.com
734-764-8775
Elsevier Health Sciences

Public Release: 31-Jul-2014
American Journal of Preventive Medicine
Vets' alcohol problems linked to stress on the home front
Regardless of traumatic events experienced during deployment, returning National Guard soldiers were more likely to develop a drinking problem if faced with civilian life setbacks, including job loss, legal problems, divorce, and serious financial and legal problems -- all commonplace in military families. Researchers at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health found having at least one civilian stressor or a reported incident of sexual harassment during deployment raised the odds of alcohol use disorders.
US Department of Defense, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Stephanie Berger
sb2247@columbia.edu
212-305-4372
Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health

Public Release: 30-Jul-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Ligaments disruption: A new perspective in the prognosis of SCI
Worldwide prevalence of spinal cord injury (SCI) is ranging from 233 to 755 per million inhabitants, whereas reported incidence lies between 10.4 and 83 per million inhabitants per year. Thus, the socioeconomic impact of SCI associated with cervical trauma is high enough to be encountered within one of the most important worries in vast majority of developed countries.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 30-Jul-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Magnetic resonance imaging in patients with transient ischemic attack
Diffusion weighted imaging-magnetic resonance imaging provides not only the evidence to distinguish between TIA and acute ischemic stroke, furthermore it predicts TIA patients who are at higher risk of disabling stroke, which can be prevented by an immediate evaluation and treatment of TIA.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 30-Jul-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Senescence in adipose-derived stem cells and its implications in nerve regeneration
Professor Magnaghi and his team from University of Milan in Italy reported some of the most important factors modulating the senescence process, which can influence adipose-derived stem cell morphology and function, and compromise their clinical application for peripheral nerve regenerative cell therapy.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 30-Jul-2014
Lancet Infectious Diseases
Researchers at SGH and Duke-NUS a step closer to finding treatment for dengue fever
A team of Singapore General Hospital and Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School researchers are now a step closer to finding a treatment for dengue fever. In the CELADEN study completed last year, the team found that Celgosivir is generally safe and well-tolerated by patients affected with the dengue virus. The discovery has moved to the next phase of trial to evaluate the efficacy and safety of an alternate dosing regimen as well as combination drug treatments.

Contact: Carol Ang
carol.ang@sgh.com.sg
65-632-14999
SingHealth

Public Release: 30-Jul-2014
Nature
Key to aging immune system is discovered
The immune system ages and weakens with time, making the elderly prone to life-threatening infection and other maladies, and a UC San Francisco research team now has discovered a reason why.
California Institute for Regenerative Medicine, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Jeffrey Norris
jeffrey.norris@ucsf.edu
415-502-6397
University of California - San Francisco

Public Release: 30-Jul-2014
New England Journal of Medicine
Resistance to key malaria drug spreading at alarming rate in Southeast Asia
Resistance to artemisinin, the main drug to treat malaria, is now widespread throughout Southeast Asia, among the Plasmodium falciparum parasites that cause the disease and is likely caused by a genetic mutation in the parasites. However, a six-day course of artemisinin-based combination therapy -- as opposed to a standard three-day course -- has proved highly effective in treating drug-resistant malaria cases, according to findings published today in the New England Journal of Medicine.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Jennifer Routh
jennifer.routh@nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 30-Jul-2014
Cell Reports
Biologists describe mechanism promoting multiple DNA mutations
The finding that cancer development often involves multiple mutations arising in clusters and in regions where chromosomal rearrangement takes place may one day lead to new cancer therapies.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Gary Galluzzo
gary-galluzzo@uiowa.edu
319-384-0009
University of Iowa

Public Release: 30-Jul-2014
Academic Medicine
Journal supplement details progress in African medical education
In the first substantial publication by participants of the $130 million Medical Education Partnership Initiative, more than 225 authors detailed progress made at African institutions in a 116-page supplement being published today by the journal Academic Medicine. The collection of 32 articles includes case studies of national strategies to increase numbers of doctors and health professionals trained; educational innovations such as e-learning; research capacity development; and partnerships that leverage advances across the MEPI network.
The President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Jeff Gray
jeffrey.gray@nih.gov
301-496-2075
NIH/Fogarty International Center

Public Release: 30-Jul-2014
Quality of Life Research
Diverticulitis patients reveal psychological, physical symptoms long after acute attacks
A UCLA team interviewed patients in great detail about the symptoms they experience weeks, months or even years after an acute diverticulitis attack. Their striking findings add to growing evidence that, for some patients, diverticulitis goes beyond isolated attacks and can lead to a chronic condition that mimics irritable bowel syndrome.The researchers used those insights to develop a questionnaire to help doctors better assess the long-term impact of diverticulitis, which ultimately could lead to better understanding and management of the disease.
Shire Pharmaceuticals

Contact: Rachel Champeau
rchampeau@mednet.ucla.edu
310-794-2270
University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences

Public Release: 30-Jul-2014
Ecology Letters
Classic Lewis Carroll character inspires new ecological model
Inspired by the Red Queen in Lewis Carroll's 'Through the Looking Glass,' collaborators from the University of Illinois and National University of Singapore improved a 35-year-old ecology model to better understand how species evolve over decades to millions of years.
Templeton World Charity Foundation

Contact: Nicholas Vasi
nvasi@illinois.edu
Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Public Release: 30-Jul-2014
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
When cooperation counts
A new study conducted by Harvard scientists shows that in Peromyscus maniculatus, a species of deer mouse known to be highly promiscuous, sperm clump together to swim in a more linear fashion, increasing their chances of fertilization.

Contact: Peter Reuell
preuell@fas.harvard.edu
617-496-8070
Harvard University

Showing releases 26-50 out of 349.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 > >>