Choose Help The Kavli Prize

EurekAlert!, a service of AAAS
Home About us
Advanced Search
25-Oct-2014 16:37
US Eastern Time

Username:

Password:

Register

Forgot Password?

Press Releases

Breaking News

Science Business

Grants, Awards, Books

Meetings

Multimedia

Science Agencies
on EurekAlert!

US Department of Energy

US National Institutes of Health

US National Science Foundation

Calendar

Submit a Calendar Item

Subscribe/Sponsor

Links & Resources

Portals

RSS Feeds

Accessibility Option On

Breaking News
US Department of Energy
US National Institutes of Health
US National Science Foundation


Arabic

Breaking News

Titles Only 

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 26-50 out of 470.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 > >>

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
Angewandte Chemie
Liquid helium offers a fascinating new way to make charged molecules
A University of Leicester chemist was involved in a 'startling' new discovery.
European Union, Austrian Science Foundation

Contact: Andrew Ellis
ame2@le.ac.uk
University of Leicester

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
Ebola virus: Update on research in France
With the current situation of the Ebola epidemic, it quickly became necessary for French research to be mobilised rapidly. In August 2014, the French Minister of Health and Secretary of State for Higher Education and Research made Aviesan responsible for preparing and organising the response of French research to infectious emergencies.

Contact: Priscille RIVIERE
presse@aviesan.fr
33-014-423-6097
INSERM (Institut national de la santé et de la recherche médicale)

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery
Cat dentals fill you with dread?
A survey published this year found that over 50 percent of final year veterinary students in the UK do not feel confident either in discussing orodental problems with clients or in performing a detailed examination of the oral cavity of their small animal patients. Once in practice, things don't always improve and, anecdotally, it seems many vets dread feline dental procedures.

Contact: Katie Baker
katie.baker@sagepub.co.uk
020-732-48719
SAGE Publications

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine
Endurance athletes at risk of swimming-induced pulmonary edema
Endurance athletes taking part in triathlons are at risk of the potentially life-threatening condition of swimming-induced pulmonary edema.

Contact: Rosalind Dewar
media@rsm.ac.uk
44-015-807-64713
SAGE Publications

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
Dissertations and Features
New methods for maintaining the quality of minimally processed potatoes for 14 days
A graduate in Food Science and Technology has proposed alternatives to the use of sulphites in potatoes, one of the main preservatives currently used and which, among other properties, prevents the browning that appears after peeling and/or cutting certain foods.

Contact: Oihane Lakar
o.lakar@elhuyar.com
0034-943-363-040
Elhuyar Fundazioa

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
For brain hemorrhage, risk of death is lower at high-volume hospitals
For patients with a severe type of stroke called subarachnoid hemorrhage, treatment at a hospital that treats a high volume of subarachnoid hemorrhage cases is associated with a lower risk of death, reports a study in the November issue of Neurosurgery, official journal of the Congress of Neurological Surgeons. The journal is published by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, a part of Wolters Kluwer Health.

Contact: Connie Hughes
Connie.Hughes@wolterskluwer.com
646-674-6348
Wolters Kluwer Health

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
IARU Sustainability Science Congress
Global boom in hydropower expected this decade
An unprecedented boom in hydropower dam construction is underway, primarily in developing countries and emerging economies. While this is expected to double the global electricity production from hydropower, it could reduce the number of our last remaining large free-flowing rivers by about 20 percent and pose a serious threat to freshwater biodiversity.

Contact: Elisabeth Wulffeld
elisabethw@snm.ku.dk
45-21-17-91-40
Faculty of Science - University of Copenhagen

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
Stroke: Journal of the American Heart Association
Medical costs for stroke survivors stay high 10 years on
New data shows that healthcare and personal costs to support survivors of stroke remains high 10 years on. The Monash University research, published today in the journal Stroke, is the first to look at the long-term costs for the two main causes of stroke; ischemic where the blood supply stops due to a blood clot, and hemorrhagic, which occurs when a weakened blood vessel supplying the brain bursts.

Contact: Lucy Handford
media@monash.edu
Monash University

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
International Journal of Cardiology
Shutting off blood supply to an extremity to protect the heart
Shutting off the blood supply to an arm or a leg before cardiac surgery protects the heart during the operation. Researchers have looked into heart muscle cells of the left chamber of the heart to understand how activation of the body's very own defense mechanisms may protect the heart in times of reduced oxygen supply.

Contact: Katrine Hordnes Slagsvold
katrine.hordnes@ntnu.no
47-911-67717
Norwegian University of Science and Technology

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
Stem Cells
Scientists engineer toxin-secreting stem cells to treat brain tumors
Harvard Stem Cell Institute scientists at Massachusetts General Hospital have devised a new way to use stem cells in the fight against brain cancer. A team led by neuroscientist Khalid Shah, M.S., Ph.D., who recently demonstrated the value of stem cells loaded with cancer-killing herpes viruses, now has a way to genetically engineer stem cells so that they can produce and secrete tumor-killing toxins.
National Institutes of Health, James S. McDonnell Foundation

Contact: Joseph Caputo
joseph_caputo@harvard.edu
617-496-1491
Harvard University

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
Receiving gossip about others promotes self-reflection and growth
Why are individuals interested in hearing gossip about others' achievements and failures? Researchers at the University of Groningen in the Netherlands studied the effect positive and negative gossip has on how the recipient evaluates him or herself. The study is published in Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin.

Contact: Jennifer Santisi
press@spsp.org
202-524-6543
Society for Personality and Social Psychology

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
Advanced Optical Materials
Three-dimensional metamaterials with a natural bent
In a significant breakthrough, published in Advanced Optical Materials, scientists from RIKEN, in collaboration with colleagues from ITRC, NARLabs in Taiwan, have succeeded in creating a large metamaterial, up to 4 mm x 4 mm2 in size, that is essentially isotropic, using a type of metamaterial element called a split-ring resonator.

Contact: Jens Wilkinson
jens.wilkinson@riken.jp
81-048-462-1225
RIKEN

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology
Overweight kids misinterpret asthma symptoms, potentially overuse medication
New research shows obese children with asthma may mistake symptoms of breathlessness for loss of asthma control leading to high and unnecessary use of rescue medications. The study was published online in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, the official scientific journal of the American Association of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology.
The Nemours Foundation

Contact: Tamara Moore
tmoore@gymr.com
202-745-5114
GYMR

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
PLOS Pathogens
To wilt or not to wilt
Plant breeders have long identified and cultivated disease-resistant varieties. A research team at the University of California, Riverside has now revealed a new molecular mechanism for resistance and susceptibility to a common fungus that causes wilt in susceptible tomato plants.
Los Alamos National Laboratory-UC Riverside Collaborative Program in Infectious Disease.

Contact: Iqbal Pittalwala
iqbal@ucr.edu
951-827-6050
University of California - Riverside

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Prevention Science
Intervention program helps prevent high-school dropouts
New research findings from a team of prevention scientists at Arizona State University demonstrates that a family-focused intervention program for middle-school Mexican American children leads to fewer drop-out rates and lower rates of alcohol and illegal drug use. This research is especially significant since Mexican American youth face significant barriers that lead them to have one of the highest high-school drop-out rates in the nation.

Contact: Julie Newberg
julie.newberg@asu.edu
480-727-3116
Arizona State University

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Journal of Environmental Psychology
Nation's 'personality' influences its environmental stewardship, shows new study
Countries with higher levels of compassion and openness score better when it comes to environmental sustainability, says research from the University of Toronto.
Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council

Contact: Ken McGuffin
mcguffin@rotman.utoronto.ca
University of Toronto, Rotman School of Management

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
NASA HS3 mission Global Hawk's bullseye in Hurricane Edouard
NASA's Hurricane Severe Storms Sentinel or HS3 mission flew the unmanned Global Hawk aircraft on two missions between Sept. 11 and 15 into Hurricane Edouard and scored a bullseye by gathering information in the eye of the strengthening storm. Scientists saw how upper-level wind shear was affecting Edouard on the HS3's Global Hawk flight of the 2014 campaign over Sept. 11 and 12, and saw the hurricane strengthen during the sixth flight on Sept. 15 and 16.
NASA, NOAA

Contact: Rob Gutro
Robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
301-286-4044
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Journal of Medical Screening
Screening questions fail to identify teens at risk for hearing loss
Subjective screening questions do not reliably identify teenagers who are at risk for hearing loss, according to researchers at Penn State College of Medicine. The results suggest that objective hearing tests should be refined for this age group to replace screening questions.
Academic Pediatric Association

Contact: Matt Solovey
msolovey@hmc.psu.edu
717-531-8606
Penn State

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
PLOS ONE
Bodies at sea: Ocean oxygen levels may impact scavenger response
An ocean's oxygen levels may play a role in the impact of marine predators on bodies when they are immersed in the sea, according to Simon Fraser University researchers, who deployed a trio of pig carcasses into Saanich Inlet off Vancouver Island and studied them using an underwater camera via the internet.
Canadian Police Research Centre

Contact: Gail Anderson
ganderso@sfu.ca
778-782-3589
Simon Fraser University

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Gastrointestinal Endoscopy
An over-the-scope clipping device for endoscopic management of gastrointestinal defects is safe and effective
A new study reports that over-the-scope clip placement is a safe and effective therapy for the closure of gastrointestinal defects such as anastomotic leaks, fistulae and perforations. Clinical success was best achieved in patients undergoing closure of perforations or leaks when over-the-scope clip placement was used for primary or rescue therapy. Overall clinical success for closure of perforations and leaks ranged between 90 percent and 73 percent; successful closure of fistulae was achieved in less than half of patients.

Contact: Anne Brownsey
abrownsey@asge.org
630-570-5635
American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Cell
Synthetic biology on ordinary paper, results off the page
Two breakthroughs clenched by Wyss scientists, paper–based synthetic gene networks and toehold switch gene regulators, could each have revolutionary impacts on synthetic biology: the former brings synthetic biology out of the traditional confinement of a living cell, the latter provides a rational design framework to enable de-novo design of both the parts and the network of gene regulation.

Contact: Kat J. McAlpine
katherine.mcalpine@wyss.harvard.edu
617-432-8266
Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Clinical Cancer Research
Dartmouth study measures breast cancer tumor response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy
A Dartmouth study suggests that it may be possible to use Diffuse Optical Spectroscopic Tomographic imaging to predict which patients will best respond to chemotherapy used to shrink breast cancer tumors before surgery. These findings could eliminate delays in effective early treatment for tumors unlikely to respond to neoadjuvant chemotherapy.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Robin Dutcher
Robin.Dutcher@hitchcock.org
603-653-9056
The Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Journal of Thoracic Oncology
Novel software application can stratify early-stage non-small cell lung cancer patients
Computer-Aided Nodule Assessment and Risk Yield, is a novel software tool developed at Mayo Clinic that can automatically quantitate adenocarcinoma pulmonary nodule characteristics from non-invasive high resolution computed tomography images and stratify non-small cell lung cancer patients into risk groups that have significantly different disease-free survival outcome.

Contact: Rob mansheim
rob.mansheim@iaslc.org
720-325-2952
International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Journal of Thoracic Oncology
European multicenter harmonization study shows anaplastic lymphoma kinase immunohistochemistry testing comparable to, if not better than, fluorescence in situ hybridization testing
Sixteen institutions across Europe collaborated together to show for the first time that a semi-quantitative anaplastic lymphoma kinase protein expression test, immunohistochemistry, is reliable amongst several laboratories and reviewers when test methodology and result interpretation are strictly standardized and the scoring pathologists are appropriately trained on the test.

Contact: Rob Mansheim
rob.mansheim@iaslc.org
720-325-2952
International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Cell Metabolism
UT Southwestern scientists discover new clues to how weight loss is regulated
A hormone seen as a popular target to develop weight-loss drugs works by directly targeting the brain and triggering previously unknown activity in the nervous system, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center obesity researchers have found.

Contact: Russell Rian
russell.rian@utsouthwestern.edu
214-648-3404
UT Southwestern Medical Center

Showing releases 26-50 out of 470.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 > >>