Choose Help The Kavli Prize

EurekAlert!, a service of AAAS
Home About us
Advanced Search
22-Jul-2014 17:42
US Eastern Time

Username:

Password:

Register

Forgot Password?

Press Releases

Breaking News

Science Business

Grants, Awards, Books

Meetings

Multimedia

Science Agencies
on EurekAlert!

US Department of Energy

US National Institutes of Health

US National Science Foundation

Calendar

Submit a Calendar Item

Subscribe/Sponsor

Links & Resources

Portals

RSS Feeds

Accessibility Option On

Breaking News
US Department of Energy
US National Institutes of Health
US National Science Foundation


Arabic

Breaking News

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 26-50 out of 453.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 > >>

Public Release: 22-Jul-2014
Psychological Science
Preschoolers can reflect on what they don't know
Contrary to previous assumptions, researchers find that preschoolers are able to gauge the strength of their memories and make decisions based on their self-assessments. The study findings are published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Anna Mikulak
amikulak@psychologicalscience.org
202-293-9300
Association for Psychological Science

Public Release: 22-Jul-2014
Nature Photonics
Enhanced NIST instrument enables high-speed chemical imaging of tissues
A NIST research team has demonstrated a dramatically improved technique for analyzing biological cells and tissues based on characteristic molecular vibrations. The new technique is an advanced form of Raman spectroscopy that is fast and accurate enough to create high-resolution images of biological specimens, with detailed spatial information on specific biomolecules, at speeds fast enough to observe changes in living cells.

Contact: Michael Baum
michael.baum@nist.gov
301-975-2763
National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)

Public Release: 22-Jul-2014
Animal Behaviour
Radio frequency ID tags on honey bees reveal hive dynamics
Scientists attached radio-frequency identification tags to hundreds of individual honey bees and tracked them for several weeks. The effort yielded two discoveries: Some foraging bees are much busier than others; and if those busy bees disappear, others will take their place.
National Science Foundation, Christopher Family Foundation

Contact: Diana Yates
diya@illinois.edu
217-333-5802
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Public Release: 22-Jul-2014
Cancer Cell
Research brings us nearer to understanding how neuro cells turn cancerous
Scientists from the Sloan-Kettering Institute for Cancer Research in New York with the help of Plymouth University Peninsula Schools of Medicine and Dentistry have completed research which for the first time brings us nearer to understanding how some cells in the brain and nervous system become cancerous.

Contact: Andrew Gould
andrew.gould@plymouth.ac.uk
University of Plymouth

Public Release: 22-Jul-2014
Journal of Consumer Research
Retail pricing strategies: Do consumers prefer deep discounts or everyday low prices?
Sometimes finding the best bang for your buck feels like a wild goose chase. It's hard to know which stores offer the best prices at any given time. According to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research, when trying to maximize savings, consumers will choose retailers they believe offer the lowest prices the majority of the time.

Contact: Mary-Ann Twist
JCR@bus.wisc.edu
608-255-5582
University of Chicago Press Journals

Public Release: 22-Jul-2014
Journal of Consumer Research
Avoiding buyer's remorse: Is product satisfaction higher when consumers are flush?
According to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research, consumers are less satisfied with what they have purchased with their bottom dollar compared to when they have money in the bank.

Contact: Mary-Ann Twist
JCR@bus.wisc.edu
608-255-5582
University of Chicago Press Journals

Public Release: 22-Jul-2014
Journal of Consumer Research
I'll have what he's having? How consumers make choices about new products
Have you found yourself at a fancy restaurant trying to impress new friends or in a foreign country and unsure of what to order? Not wanting to appear foolish, you just go along with everyone else. According to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research, we're more likely to copy other people's choices when we lack social acceptance or enough information to make an informed decision.

Contact: Mary-Ann Twist
JCR@bus.wisc.edu
608-255-5582
University of Chicago Press Journals

Public Release: 22-Jul-2014
Journal of Consumer Research
Empathy or justice: What makes consumers donate more to charity?
Have you ever received a request for help and wondered how deserving the recipients are of your donation? This way of thinking may seem inconsistent with your moral values, especially if you consider yourself an otherwise compassionate and empathic person. A new study in the Journal of Consumer Research suggests that moral identity decreases donations when recipients are deemed to be responsible for their plight.

Contact: Mary-Ann Twist
JCR@bus.wisc.edu
608-255-5582
University of Chicago Press Journals

Public Release: 22-Jul-2014
Nature
Mount Sinai scientists and international team shed new light on schizophrenia
As part of a multinational, collaborative effort, researchers from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai have helped identify over 100 locations in the human genome associated with the risk of developing schizophrenia, in the largest genomic study published on any psychiatric disorder to date, conducted with 80,000 people.
National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Glenn Farrell
glenn.farrell@mssm.edu
650-690-1598
The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine

Public Release: 22-Jul-2014
Journal of Consumer Research
P90X? Why consumers choose high-effort products
Stuck in traffic? On hold for what seems like an eternity? Consumers often face situations that undermine their feelings of control. According to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research, when a person's sense of control is threatened, they are more likely to seek out products that require hard work.

Contact: Mary-Ann Twist
JCR@bus.wisc.edu
608-255-5582
University of Chicago Press Journals

Public Release: 22-Jul-2014
Flow Measurement and Instrumentation
Fill 'er up: NIST develops prototype meter test for hydrogen refueling stations
To support the fair sale of gaseous hydrogen as a vehicle fuel, National Institute of Standards and Technology researchers have developed a prototype field test standard to test the accuracy of hydrogen fuel dispensers. Once the standard is field tested, it will serve as a model for constructing similar devices for state weights and measures inspectors to use.

Contact: Mark Esser
mark.esser@nist.gov
301-975-8735
National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)

Public Release: 22-Jul-2014
Journal of Consumer Research
Overdoing it: Multiple perspectives confuse consumers
When it comes to television advertising, simple may be best, says Dr. Yael Steinhart of Tel Aviv University. Her new study reports that multiple angles and perspectives in commercials may actually prevent consumers from forming positive associations about the products. She found this to be particularly true for consumers who imagine using the products themselves in the course of evaluating them.

Contact: George Hunka
ghunka@aftau.org
212-742-9070
American Friends of Tel Aviv University

Public Release: 22-Jul-2014
Journal of Consumer Research
Why do challenging tasks make consumers believe drugs wear off faster?
Imagine that you have a cup of coffee and sit down to read People magazine. How long do you think the energy boost will last before you reach for another cup? Would you need more caffeine if you tried to read War and Peace? A new study in the Journal of Consumer Research finds that consumers wrongly believe that pharmacological products such as coffee and aspirin lose their effectiveness when they engage in more strenuous activities.

Contact: Mary-Ann Twist
JCR@bus.wisc.edu
608-255-5582
University of Chicago Press Journals

Public Release: 22-Jul-2014
Optica
'Comb on a chip' powers new NIST/Caltech atomic clock design
NIST and CalTech researchers have demonstrated a novel design for a small atomic clock that is based on a chip-scale frequency comb, or a microcomb.

Contact: Laura Ost
laura.ost@nist.gov
303-497-4880
National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)

Public Release: 22-Jul-2014
Journal of Consumer Research
You deserve it! Are consumers more likely to buy unique products when made to feel special?
Graduating from college is an important life event often attributed to being smart and working hard. Many people celebrate this milestone achievement by buying themselves an expensive gift or taking a dream vacation. A new study in the Journal of Consumer Research shows that consumers who attribute their successes to internal character traits rather than hard work are more likely to select unique products.

Contact: Mary-Ann Twist
JCR@bus.wisc.edu
608-255-5582
University of Chicago Press Journals

Public Release: 22-Jul-2014
Journal of Consumer Research
Trying to get kids to eat healthier? Don't tell them veggies are good for them
At some point, most kids will hear that drinking milk helps make their bones strong or that fish is food for the brain. But do these messages foster the idea that if something is good for us, it must surely taste bad? According to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research, when children hear about the benefits of healthy food, they're less likely to eat it.

Contact: Mary-Ann Twist
JCR@bus.wisc.edu
608-255-5582
University of Chicago Press Journals

Public Release: 22-Jul-2014
Journal of Consumer Research
The nostalgia effect: Do consumers spend more when thinking about the past?
Say you are out clothes shopping and you spot something that brings you back to a special time from your childhood when you were surrounded by friends and family. Suddenly, you find yourself purchasing an expensive shirt that makes you feel like a kid again. According to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research, we're more likely to spend money when we're feeling nostalgic.

Contact: Mary-Ann Twist
JCR@bus.wisc.edu
608-255-5582
University of Chicago Press Journals

Public Release: 22-Jul-2014
Obesity
Study compares cost-effectiveness of weight-loss programs and drugs
In a cost-effectiveness analysis of commercial diet programs and pills, the Weight Watchers program and the drug Qsymia showed the best value for the money. The Jenny Craig regimen generated the greatest weight loss, but was also the most expensive option tested, according to researchers at Duke-National University of Singapore Graduate Medical School.

Contact: Sarah Avery
sarah.avery@duke.edu
919-660-1306
Duke University Medical Center

Public Release: 22-Jul-2014
BioResearch Open Access
Novel methods may help stem cells survive transplantation into damaged tissues
Stem cells offer much promise for treating damaged organs and tissues, but with current transplantation approaches stem cell survival is poor, limiting their effectiveness.

Contact: Kathryn Ruehle
kruehle@liebertpub.com
914-740-2100
Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News

Public Release: 22-Jul-2014
Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics
Room for improvement in elementary school children's lunches and snacks from home
Open a child's lunch box and you're likely to find that the lunches and snacks inside fall short of federal guidelines, report researchers from the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts University.
NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Boston Obesity Research Center

Contact: Andrea Grossman
andrea.grossman@tufts.edu
617-636-3728
Tufts University, Health Sciences Campus

Public Release: 22-Jul-2014
Nature
LSUHSC contributes to work identifying new DNA regions associated with schizophrenia
Nancy Buccola, Assistant Professor of Clinical Nursing at Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center New Orleans School of Nursing, contributed samples used in a study reporting new locations of genetic material associated with schizophrenia and also suggesting a possible link between the immune system and schizophrenia.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Leslie Capo
lcapo@lsuhsc.edu
504-568-4806
Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center

Public Release: 22-Jul-2014
Health & Place
Natural-terrain schoolyards reduce children's stress, says Colorado University-Boulder study
Playing in schoolyards that feature natural habitats and trees and not just asphalt and recreation equipment reduces children's stress and inattention, according to a University of Colorado Boulder study.

Contact: Louise Chawla
303-492-5228
University of Colorado at Boulder

Public Release: 22-Jul-2014
Social Problems
African-American homeownership increasingly less stable and more risky
A new study from sociologists at Rice University and Cornell University found that African-Americans are 45 percent more likely than whites to switch from owning their homes to renting them.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University

Public Release: 22-Jul-2014
Biological Psychiatry
Low strength brain stimulation may be effective for depression
Brain stimulation treatments, like electroconvulsive therapy and transcranial magnetic stimulation, are often effective for the treatment of depression. Like antidepressant medications, however, they typically have a delayed onset. For example, a patient may receive several weeks of regular electroconvulsive therapy treatments before a full response is achieved.

Contact: Rhiannon Bugno
Biol.Psych@utsouthwestern.edu
214-648-0880
Elsevier

Public Release: 22-Jul-2014
Molecular and Cellular Proteomics
Rigid connections: Molecular basis of age-related memory loss explained
From telephone numbers to foreign vocabulary, our brains hold a seemingly endless supply of information. However, as we are getting older, our ability to learn and remember new things declines. A team of scientists around Dr. Antonio Del Sol Mesa from the Luxembourg Centre for Systems Biomedicine of the University of Luxembourg and Dr. Ronald van Kesteren of the Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam have identified the molecular mechanisms of this cognitive decline using latest high-throughput proteomics and statistical methods.

Contact: Britta Schlüter
britta.schlueter@uni.lu
352-466-644-6563
University of Luxembourg

Showing releases 26-50 out of 453.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 > >>