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Showing releases 26-50 out of 348.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 > >>

Public Release: 24-Apr-2014
Anesthesia & Analgesia
New approach for surgery patients cuts hospital stays and costs
Changes in managing patients before, during and after colorectal surgery cut hospital stays by two days and reduced readmission rates, according to researchers who led a study of the approach at Duke University Hospital.

Contact: Sarah Avery
sarah.avery@duke.edu
919-660-1306
Duke University Medical Center

Public Release: 24-Apr-2014
Childhood Obesity
Take the bat, leave the candy
'Take me out to the ballgame' doesn't exactly conjure up images of apple slices and kale chips. The more likely culprits include French fries, soda and the occasional box of Crackerjacks.
NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Contact: Marguerite Beck
marbeck@wakehealth.edu
336-716-2415
Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center

Public Release: 24-Apr-2014
Optometry and Vision Science
Study supports safety of antimicrobial peptide-coated contact lenses
Contact lenses coated with an antimicrobial peptide could help to lower the risk of contact lens-related infections, reports a study in Optometry and Vision Science, official journal of the American Academy of Optometry. The journal is published by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, a part of Wolters Kluwer Health.

Contact: Connie Hughes
Connie.Hughes@wolterskluwer.com
646-674-6348
Wolters Kluwer Health

Public Release: 24-Apr-2014
Science
Genetic code of the deadly tsetse fly unraveled
A decade-long effort by members of the International Glossina Genome Initiative has produced the first complete genome sequence of the tsetse fly, Glossina morsitans. The blood-sucking insect is the sole transmitter of sleeping sickness, a potentially deadly disease endemic in sub-Saharan Africa. The vast store of genetic data will help researchers develop new ways to prevent the disease and provide insights into the tsetse fly's unique biology.

Contact: Jelle Caers
jelle.caers@bio.kuleuven.be
32-495-840-513
KU Leuven

Public Release: 24-Apr-2014
Scientific Reports
The blood preserved in the pumpkin did not belong to Louis XVI
The results of an international study, which counted on the participation of the Spanish National Research Council, indicate that the DNA recovered from the inside of a pumpkin, attributed so far to the French King Louis XVI, does not actually belong to the monarch, guillotined in 1793. Complete genome sequencing suggests that blood remains correspond to a male with brown eyes, instead of blue as Louis XVI had, and shorter.

Contact: Marta García Gonzalo
marta.garcia@csic.es
34-915-681-476
Spanish National Research Council (CSIC)

Public Release: 24-Apr-2014
Global Ecology and Biogeography
Amazon rainforest survey could improve carbon offset schemes
Carbon offsetting initiatives could be improved with new insights into the make-up of tropical forests, a study suggests.
Natural Environment Research Council

Contact: Catriona Kelly
Catriona.Kelly@ed.ac.uk
44-131-651-4401
University of Edinburgh

Public Release: 24-Apr-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Study: Altruistic adolescents less likely to become depressed
It is better to give than to receive –- at least if you're an adolescent and you enjoy giving, a new study suggests. The study found that 15- and 16-year-olds who find pleasure in pro-social activities, such as giving their money to family members, are less likely to become depressed than those who get a bigger thrill from taking risks or keeping the money for themselves.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation

Contact: Diana Yates
diya@illinois.edu
217-333-5802
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Public Release: 24-Apr-2014
Psychological Science
Take notes by hand for better long-term comprehension
Dust off those Bic ballpoints and college-ruled notebooks -- research shows that taking notes by hand is better than taking notes on a laptop for remembering conceptual information over the long term. The findings are published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.

Contact: Anna Mikulak
amikulak@psychologicalscience.org
202-293-9300
Association for Psychological Science

Public Release: 24-Apr-2014
Lancet Respiratory Medicine
Vanderbilt study finds physical signs of depression common among ICU survivors
Depression affects more than one out of three survivors of critical illness, according to a Vanderbilt study released in The Lancet Respiratory Medicine, and the majority of patients experience their symptoms physically rather than mentally.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Craig Boerner
craig.boerner@vanderbilt.edu
615-322-4747
Vanderbilt University Medical Center

Public Release: 24-Apr-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Animals with bigger brains, broader diets have better self control
A new study representing the largest study of animal intelligence to-date finds that animals with bigger brains and broader diets have better self-control. Published this week in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the results are part of a long history of research aimed at understanding why some species are able to do things like make and use tools, read social cues, or even understand basic math, and others aren't.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Robin Ann Smith
rsmith@nescent.org
919-668-4544
National Evolutionary Synthesis Center (NESCent)

Public Release: 24-Apr-2014
New England Journal of Medicine
HHS leaders call for expanded use of medications to combat opioid overdose epidemic
A national response to the epidemic of prescription opioid overdose deaths was outlined yesterday in the New England Journal of Medicine by leaders of agencies in the US Department of Health and Human Services. The commentary calls upon health care providers to expand their use of medications to treat opioid addiction and reduce overdose deaths, and describes a number of misperceptions that have limited access to these potentially life-saving medications.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services

Contact: NIDA Press Team
media@nida.nih.gov
301-443-6245
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Public Release: 24-Apr-2014
Physical Review Letters
Using antineutrinos to monitor nuclear reactors
When monitoring nuclear reactors, the International Atomic Energy Agency has to rely on input given by the operators. In the future, antineutrino detectors may provide an additional option for monitoring. However, heretofore the cumulative antineutrino spectrum of uranium 238 fission products was missing. Physicists at Technische Universität München have now closed this gap using fast neutrons from the Heinz Maier Leibnitz Neutron Research Facility.
Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft

Contact: Nils Haag
nils.haag@ph.tum.de
49-892-891-2524
Technische Universitaet Muenchen

Public Release: 24-Apr-2014
Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition
Taking a walk may lead to more creativity than sitting, study finds
When the task at hand requires some imagination, taking a walk may lead to more creative thinking than sitting, according to research published by the American Psychological Association.

Contact: Lisa Bowen
lbowen@apa.org
202-336-5707
American Psychological Association

Public Release: 24-Apr-2014
Biomedical Optics Express
Bake your own droplet lens
Researchers have created a new type of lens that costs less than a penny to make, and can be used in a 3-D printed attachment that turns a Smartphone into a dermascope, a tool to diagnose skin diseases like melanoma. Normal dermascopes can cost $500 or more, but this version costs a mere $2 and is slated to be commercially available in just a few months. The work was published today in the journal Biomedical Optics Express.

Contact: Angela Stark
astark@osa.org
202-416-1443
The Optical Society

Public Release: 24-Apr-2014
ACS Nano
Protecting olive oil from counterfeiters
Who guarantees that expensive olive oil isn't counterfeit or adulterated? An invisible label, developed by ETH Zurich researchers, could perform this task. The tag consists of tiny magnetic DNA particles encapsulated in a silica casing and mixed with the oil.

Contact: Robert Grass
robert.grass@chem.ethz.ch
41-446-336-334
ETH Zurich

Public Release: 24-Apr-2014
International Journal of Cancer
Breast cancer replicates brain development process
New research led by a scientist at the University of York reveals that a process that forms a key element in the development of the nervous system may also play a pivotal role in the spread of breast cancer.
United Kingdom Medical Research Council

Contact: David Garner
david.garner@york.ac.uk
44-019-043-22153
University of York

Public Release: 24-Apr-2014
Zootaxa
Two new US turtle species described
The alligator snapping turtle is the largest river turtle in North America, weighing in at up to 200 pounds and living almost a century. Now researchers from Florida and the University of Vermont have discovered that it is not one species -- but three. One of the new species lives only in the Suwannee River and is highly imperiled.

Contact: Joshua Brown
joshua.e.brown@uvm.edu
802-656-3039
University of Vermont

Public Release: 24-Apr-2014
Stem Cell Reports
Skin layer grown from human stem cells could replace animals in drug and cosmetics testing
An international team led by King's College London and the San Francisco Veteran Affairs Medical Center has developed the first lab-grown epidermis -- the outermost skin layer -- with a functional permeability barrier akin to real skin. The new epidermis, grown from human pluripotent stem cells, offers a cost-effective alternative lab model for testing drugs and cosmetics, and could also help to develop new therapies for rare and common skin disorders.

Contact: Jenny Gimpel
jenny.gimpel@kcl.ac.uk
44-020-784-84334
King's College London

Public Release: 24-Apr-2014
Genome Announcements
Novel therapeutic agent for Tamiflu-resistant pH1N1 influenza virus discovered
Researchers at the Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland FIMM, University of Helsinki, with their collaborators have shown that first Tamiflu resistant pandemic influenza pH1N1 viruses have emerged in Finland. Furthermore, they have identified a novel antiviral agent MK2206 and shown that the pH1N1 viruses are not able to develop resistance against it.

Contact: Denis Kainov
denis.kainov@fimm.fi
358-504-152-35460
University of Helsinki

Public Release: 24-Apr-2014
IEEE Transactions on Ultrasonics, Ferroelectrics and Frequency Control
New ultrasound device may add in detecting risk for heart attack, stroke
Researchers from North Carolina State University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill have developed a new ultrasound device that could help identify arterial plaque that is at high risk of breaking off and causing heart attack or stroke.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Matt Shipman
matt_shipman@ncsu.edu
919-515-6386
North Carolina State University

Public Release: 24-Apr-2014
mBio
Treatment for deadly yeast disease reduced to 3 days
Initial treatment for a brain infection caused by fungus could now be treated in three days, rather than two weeks, due to study by University of Liverpool scientists.

Contact: Jamie Brown
jamie.brown@liverpool.ac.uk
44-151-794-2248
University of Liverpool

Public Release: 24-Apr-2014
Nature
How productive are the ore factories in the deep sea?
Hydrothermal vents in the deep sea, the so-called 'black smokers,' are fascinating geological formations. They are home to unique ecosystems, but are also potential suppliers of raw materials for the future. They are driven by volcanic 'power plants' in the seafloor. But how exactly do they extract their energy from the volcanic rock? Researchers at GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel have now used computer simulations to understand the underground supply routes. The study is published in the international journal 'Nature.'
German Science Foundation/Cluster of Excellence-The Future Ocean

Contact: jsteffen@geomar.de
presse@geomar.de
Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel (GEOMAR)

Public Release: 24-Apr-2014
PLOS Pathogens
Viral infections: Identifying the tell-tale patterns
Researchers at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet in Munich have identified the structural features that enable the innate immune system to discriminate between viral and endogenous RNAs in living cells.

Contact: Luise Dirscherl
presse@lmu.de
49-892-180-3423
Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München

Public Release: 24-Apr-2014
Journal of Pathology
Finnish team of researchers finds a mutation in a tumor of the jaw
A Finnish team of researchers was the first in the world to discover a gene mutation in ameloblastoma, which is a tumor of the jaw. Researchers have been searching for the mutation that causes ameloblastoma for decades, and this mutation has now been found in a patient living in the eastern part of Finland.

Contact: Kristiina Heikinheimo
krihei@uef.fi
358-505-642-669
University of Eastern Finland

Public Release: 24-Apr-2014
British Sociological Association Annual Conference 2014
Children living with a lone parent are as happy as those with 2
Children living with a step-parent or a lone parent are as happy as those living with two biological parents.

Contact: Tony Trueman
tony.trueman@britsoc.org.uk
44-796-402-3392
British Sociological Association

Showing releases 26-50 out of 348.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 > >>