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Showing releases 251-275 out of 425.

<< < 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 > >>

Public Release: 15-Apr-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Breaking bad mitochondria
Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have identified a mechanism that explains why people with the hepatitis C virus get liver disease and why the virus is able to persist in the body for so long.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Scott LaFee
slafee@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 15-Apr-2014
Journal of Family Psychology
Real-time audio of corporal punishment shows kids misbehave within 10 minutes of spanking
Real-time audio recordings of children being spanked showed parents responded impulsively or emotionally, rather than being intentional with their discipline, says psychologist and parenting expert George Holden, Southern Methodist University, Dallas, the study's lead author. SMU researchers discovered that spanking was more common than parents admit, that children were hit for trivial misdeeds, and that children misbehaved within 10 minutes of punishment. The findings are reported in the American Psychological Association's Journal of Family Psychology.
Timberlawn Psychiatric Research Foundation

Contact: Margaret Allen
mallen@smu.edu
214-768-7664
Southern Methodist University

Public Release: 15-Apr-2014
British Medical Journal
Antibiotics improve growth in children in developing countries
Antibiotics improve growth in children at risk of undernourishment in low and middle income countries, according to researchers at McGill University who have just conducted a research literature review on the subject. Their results, published in the British Medical Journal, suggest that the youngest children from the most vulnerable populations benefit most and show significant improvements toward expected growth for their age and sex, particularly for weight.

Contact: Cynthia Lee
cynthia.lee@mcgill.ca
514-398-6754
McGill University

Public Release: 15-Apr-2014
Journal of Experimental Social Psychology
Cultivating happiness often misunderstood, says Stanford researcher
Stanford research explores the concept of maximizing happiness, and finds that pursuing concrete 'giving' goals rather than abstract ones leads to greater satisfaction.

Contact: Clifton B. Parker
cbparker@stanford.edu
650-725-0224
Stanford University

Public Release: 15-Apr-2014
Nature Communications
Lifestyle determines gut microbes
An international team of researchers has for the first time deciphered the intestinal bacteria of present-day hunter-gatherers.

Contact: Dr. Amanda Henry
amanda_henry@eva.mpg.de
49-341-355-0381
Max-Planck-Gesellschaft

Public Release: 15-Apr-2014
ACC.14
Calcium score predicts future heart disease among adults with little or no risk factors
Researchers found that the process of 'calcium scoring' is accurate in predicting the chances of dying of heart disease among adults with little or no known risks of heart disease.

Contact: Laura Mecoy
Lmecoy@labiomed.org
310-546-5860
Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center (LA BioMed)

Public Release: 15-Apr-2014
International Supercomputing Conference -- ISC'14
Earthquake simulation tops 1 quadrillion flops
A team of computer scientists, mathematicians and geophysicists at Technische Universitaet Muenchen and Ludwig-Maximillians Universitaet Muenchen have -- with the support of the Leibniz Supercomputing Center of the Bavarian Academy of Sciences and Humanities (LRZ) -- optimized the SeisSol earthquake simulation software on the SuperMUC high performance computer at the LRZ to push its performance beyond the 'magical' one petaflops mark -- one quadrillion floating point operations per second.
Volkswagen Foundation, KONWIHR, German Research Foundation, Leibniz-Rechenzentrum, European Union

Contact: Dr. Andreas Battenberg
battenberg@zv.tum.de
49-892-891-0510
Technische Universitaet Muenchen

Public Release: 15-Apr-2014
Journal of the Royal Society Interface
Photo: Tiger beetle's chase highlights mechanical law
If an insect drew a line as it chased its next meal, the resulting pattern would be a tangled mess. But there's method to that mess: It turns out the tiger beetle, known for its speed and agility, does an optimal reorientation dance as it chases its prey at blinding speeds.

Contact: Syl Kacapyr
vpk6@cornell.edu
607-255-7701
Cornell University

Public Release: 15-Apr-2014
Canadian Medical Association Journal
Pharmacist-led interventions show high success rates for post-stroke care
Researchers investigate new standard of continuity of care for stroke patients.
Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada, Alberta Innovates-Health Solutions, Knowledge Translation Canada

Contact: Amy Hewko
ahewko@ualberta.ca
780-492-0647
University of Alberta Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry

Public Release: 15-Apr-2014
eLife
Biologists develop nanosensors to visualize movements and distribution of plant hormone
Biologists at UC San Diego have succeeded in visualizing the movement within plants of a key hormone responsible for growth and resistance to drought. The achievement will allow researchers to conduct further studies to determine how the hormone helps plants respond to drought and other environmental stresses driven by the continuing increase in the atmosphere's carbon dioxide, or CO2, concentration.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, Department of Energy

Contact: Kim McDonald
kmcdonald@ucsd.edu
858-534-7572
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 15-Apr-2014
Developmental Psychology
How mothers help children explore right and wrong
Moms want their kids to grow up to be good people -- but how do they actually help their offspring sort out different types of moral issues? A new study shows many moms talk to their kids in ways that help them understand moral missteps.

Contact: Clea Desjardins
clea.desjardins@concordia.ca
51-484-824-245-068
Concordia University

Public Release: 15-Apr-2014
Journal of Physiology
Genetic pre-disposition toward exercise and mental development may be linked
Frank Booth, a professor in the MU College of Veterinary Medicine, has found a potential link between the genetic pre-disposition for high levels of exercise motivation and the speed at which mental maturation occurs.

Contact: Nathan Hurst
hurstn@missouri.edu
573-882-6217
University of Missouri-Columbia

Public Release: 15-Apr-2014
Journal of Health and Social Behavior
Girls' mental health suffers when romances unfold differently than they imagined
A new study reveals that for adolescent girls, having a romantic relationship play out differently than they imagined it would has negative implications for their mental health.

Contact: Daniel Fowler
pubinfo@asanet.org
202-527-7885
American Sociological Association

Public Release: 15-Apr-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
The key to easy asthma diagnosis is in the blood
Using just a single drop of blood, a team of University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers has developed a faster, cheaper and more accurate tool for diagnosing even mild cases of asthma.

Contact: David Beebe
djbeebe@wisc.edu
608-262-2260
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Public Release: 15-Apr-2014
NASA's TRMM Satellite adds up Tropical Cyclone Ita's Australian soaking
After coming ashore on April 11, Tropical Cyclone Ita dropped heavy rainfall over the weekend that caused flooding in many areas of northeastern Australia's state of Queensland. The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission satellite known as TRMM gathered data on rainfall that was used to create a rainfall map at NASA.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 15-Apr-2014
Journal of American Geriatrics Society
Study examines vitamin D deficiency and cognition relationship
A study that looks at the vitamin D deficiency and cognition relationship in older adults adds to the existing literature on the subject.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Institute on Aging, NIH/National Institute of Nursing

Contact: Bonnie Davis
bdavis@wakehealth.edu
336-716-4977
Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center

Public Release: 15-Apr-2014
Remnants of Tropical Depression Peipah still raining on Philippines
Several regions in the south and central Philippines have flood advisories as the remnants of now dissipated Tropical Depression Peipah continue to linger over the country. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite got a look at the remnant clouds from its orbit in space on April 15.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 15-Apr-2014
Journal of Environmental Quality
Predicting bioavailable cadmium levels in soils
A New Zealand study shows soil pH and iron levels predict cadmium bioavailability, offers solutions to farmers and ranchers.

Contact: Susan Fisk
sfisk@sciencesocieties.org
608-273-8091
American Society of Agronomy

Public Release: 15-Apr-2014
Biological Procedures Online
New method isolates immune cells for researchers to study how they ward off oral diseases
Case Western Reserve University dental researchers have found a less invasive way to extract single rare immune cells from the mouth to study how the mouth's natural defenses ward off infection and inflammation.
Case Western Reserve University School of Dental Medicine

Contact: Susan Griffith
susan.griffith@case.edu
216-368-1004
Case Western Reserve University

Public Release: 15-Apr-2014
European Journal of Cancer
Can refined categorization improve prediction of patient survival in RECIST 1.1?
In a recent analysis by the RECIST Working Group published in the European Journal of Cancer, EORTC researchers had explored whether a more refined categorization of tumor response or various aspects of progression could improve prediction of overall survival in the RECIST database. They found that modeling target lesion tumor growth did not improve the prediction of overall survival above and beyond that of the other components of progression.
European Organisation for Research and Treatment Charitable Trust

Contact: John Bean
john.bean@eortc.be
European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer

Public Release: 15-Apr-2014
Journal of Consumer Research
Consumer predictions: Do categories matter when predicting the lottery or stock market?
From sports to the stock market and even winning the lottery, it's in our nature to predict who or what will come out on top. But, sometimes we can't see the forest for the trees. According to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research, people are more likely to make a prediction about something when it is grouped in a large category of similar items.

Contact: Mary-Ann Twist
JCR@bus.wisc.edu
608-255-5582
University of Chicago Press Journals

Public Release: 15-Apr-2014
Journal of Consumer Research
Chew on this: How does food texture impact its perceived calorie content?
Food is an intimately personal thing; we savor some tastes and despise others. But how does the way we chew and eat our food impact our overall consumption? According to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research, people perceive foods that are either hard or have a rough texture to have fewer calories.

Contact: Mary-Ann Twist
JCR@bus.wisc.edu
608-255-5582
University of Chicago Press Journals

Public Release: 15-Apr-2014
Ear and Hearing
Research gives new insights into rare disease of the inner ear
In the most comprehensive study of Meniere's disease to date, researchers at the University of Exeter Medical School have been able to suggest what goes wrong in the body when people develop the disease, and provide an insight into factors that lead to its development.

Contact: Louise Vennells
l.vennells@exeter.ac.uk
44-139-272-4927
University of Exeter

Public Release: 15-Apr-2014
Journal of Consumer Research
Charitable donation discrepancies: Why are some countries more generous than others?
When it comes to charitable giving, some countries open their collective wallets more than others. According to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research, people who live in countries that promote equality in power and wealth are more likely to donate money than those who live in societies that expect and accept inequality.

Contact: Mary-Ann Twist
JCR@bus.wisc.edu
608-255-5582
University of Chicago Press Journals

Public Release: 15-Apr-2014
American Naturalist
Sibling cooperation in earwig families gives clues to early evolution of social behavior
Looking at the question of how social behavior has developed over the course of evolution, scientists from the universities in Mainz and Basel have gained new insights from the study of earwigs. The team of biologists from Mainz University and the University of Basel investigated the interactions between siblings of the European earwig (Forficula auricularia).

Contact: Dr. Joël Meunier
meunier@uni-mainz.de
49-613-139-27852
Johannes Gutenberg Universitaet Mainz

Showing releases 251-275 out of 425.

<< < 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 > >>