Choose Help The Kavli Prize

EurekAlert!, a service of AAAS
Home About us
Advanced Search
2-Sep-2014 13:06
US Eastern Time

Username:

Password:

Register

Forgot Password?

Press Releases

Breaking News

Science Business

Grants, Awards, Books

Meetings

Multimedia

Science Agencies
on EurekAlert!

US Department of Energy

US National Institutes of Health

US National Science Foundation

Calendar

Submit a Calendar Item

Subscribe/Sponsor

Links & Resources

Portals

RSS Feeds

Accessibility Option On

Breaking News
US Department of Energy
US National Institutes of Health
US National Science Foundation


Arabic

Breaking News

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 251-275 out of 407.

<< < 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 > >>

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Journal of Applied Physics
New analytical technology reveals 'nanomechanical' surface traits
A new research platform uses a laser to measure the 'nanomechanical' properties of tiny structures undergoing stress and heating, an approach likely to yield insights to improve designs for microelectronics and batteries.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Emil Venere
venere@purdue.edu
765-494-4709
Purdue University

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
American Journal of Botany
Together, humans and computers can figure out the plant world
Recent research applying bioinformatics and biometrics to the study of plant form and function is presented in a special issue on Bioinformatic and Biometric Methods in Plant Morphology, published in Applications in Plant Sciences. The methods presented in the issue include automated classification and identification, a new online pollen database with semantic search capabilities, geometric morphometrics, and skeleton networks, and present a picture of a renaissance in morphometric approaches that capitalize on recent technological advances.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Beth Parada
apps@botany.org
American Journal of Botany

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Journal of Dental Hygiene
UTHealth researchers find up to 3,000 times the bacterial growth on hollow-head toothbrushes
Solid-head power toothbrushes retain less bacteria compared to hollow-head toothbrushes, according to researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston School of Dentistry.
Advanced Response Corporation

Contact: Edgar Veliz
Edgar.R.Veliz@uth.tmc.edu
713-500-3307
University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Surgery
Females ignored in basic medical research
A new study from Northwestern Medicine has found that surgical researchers rarely use female animals or female cells in their published studies -- despite a huge body of evidence showing that sex differences can play a crucial role in medical research.

Contact: Erin White
ewhite@northwestern.edu
847-491-4888
Northwestern University

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Environmental Science: Processes and Impacts
New solutions needed to recycle fracking water
Rice University scientists have produced a detailed analysis of water produced by hydraulic fracturing of three gas reservoirs and suggested environmentally friendly remedies are needed to treat and reuse it.
Robert A. Welch Foundation, Welsh Government Sêr Cymru Program

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Antiquity
Ancient metal workers were not slaves but highly regarded craftsmen
In the course of ongoing excavations at Timna Valley, Tel Aviv University archaeologists analyzed remnants of food eaten by copper smelters 3,000 years ago. This analysis indicates that the laborers operating the furnaces were in fact skilled craftsmen who enjoyed high social status and adulation. They believe their discovery may have ramifications for similar sites across the region.

Contact: George Hunka
ghunka@aftau.org
212-742-9070
American Friends of Tel Aviv University

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Biomedical Optics Express
This is your brain's blood vessels on drugs
Researchers from Stony Brook University and NIH used a laser-based method to produce the first-ever set of images clearly and directly detailing how cocaine shuts down blood flow in the brain. This could help doctors and researchers better understand how drug abuse affects the brain, which may aid in improving brain-cancer surgery and tissue engineering, and lead to better treatment for recovering drug addicts. The work was published today in the journal Biomedical Optics Express.

Contact: Angela Stark
astark@osa.org
202-416-1443
The Optical Society

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
British Journal of Cancer
Some women still don't underststand 'overdiagnosis' risk in breast screening
A third of women who are given information about the chance of 'overdiagnosis' through the NHS breast screening programme may not fully understand the risks involved.
Cancer Research UK

Contact: Flora Malein
flora.malein@cancer.org.uk
020-346-98300
Cancer Research UK

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
European Physical Journal B
Inter-dependent networks stress test
Energy production systems are good examples of complex systems. Their infrastructure equipment requires ancillary sub-systems structured like a network -- including water for cooling, transport to supply fuel, and ICT systems for control and management. Every step in the network chain is interconnected with a wider network and they are all mutually dependent. Gaihua Fu and colleagues have studied various aspects of inter-network dependencies, not previously explored, and their findings have been published in EPJ B.

Contact: Laura Zimmermann
laura.zimmermann@springer.com
49-622-148-78414
Springer

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Journal of the American Chemical Society
Synthesis produces new antibiotic
Scientists at Rice University synthesize a natural, fungus-derived antibiotic that could someday help wage the battle against resistant superbugs.
National Institutes of Health, Skaggs Institute of Research, Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas, Welch Foundation

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Journal of Allergy & Clinical Immunology
Indoor mold poses health risk to asthma sufferers
By critically reviewing the findings from 17 studies in eight different countries, the research has found that the presence of several types of mould can lead to breathing problems in asthma sufferers, as well as increasing the likelihood of developing the condition.

Contact: Louise Vennells
l.vennells@exeter.ac.uk
0044-139-272-2062
University of Exeter

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Nature
Study shows where on the planet new roads should and should not go
Researchers have created a 'large-scale zoning plan' that aims to limit the environmental costs of road expansion while maximizing its benefits for human development.

Contact: Fred Lewsey
fred.lewsey@admin.cam.ac.uk
44-122-376-5566
University of Cambridge

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases
Ontario has one of the highest rates of IBD in the world
New population-based study puts puts Ontario in the 90th percentile for IBD prevalence in the world; 'Dr. Benchimol's work provides further proof that we need to continue our fight to cure Crohn's and colitis and improve the lives of children and adults living with these chronic diseases.'

Contact: Adrienne Vienneau
avienneau@cheo.on.ca
613-737-7600 x4144
Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario Research Institute

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Physical Review Letters
New technique uses fraction of measurements to efficiently find quantum wave functions
Just two years ago, with the advent of a technique called direct measurement, scientists discovered they could reliably determine a system's wave function by 'weakly' measuring one of its variables (e.g. position) and 'strongly' measuring a complementary variable (momentum). Researchers at the University of Rochester have now taken this method one step forward by combining direct measurement with an efficient computational technique.
Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency's Information in a Photon program, US Defense Threat Reduction Agency, National Science Foundation, El Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnología, Canadian Excellence Research Chair

Contact: Peter Iglinski
peter.iglinski@rochester.edu
585-273-4726
University of Rochester

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Getting graffiti off a masterpiece (video)
Works of art can take years to create and just seconds to deface. Restoration experts teamed up with Dow Chemical to create a cleanser that would get rid of the graffiti and leave the art intact. Learn all about it in this episode of Speaking of Chemistry.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Gastroenterology
Drug shows promise for subset of stage III colon cancer patients
A subset of patients with stage III colon cancer had improved survival rates when treated with irinotecan-based therapy, according to a new study in Gastroenterology.

Contact: Aimee Frank
media@gastro.org
301-941-2620
American Gastroenterological Association

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Science
New DNA study unravels the settlement history of the New World Arctic
A new DNA study unravels the settlement history of the New World Arctic.

Contact: Eske Willerslev
ewillerslev@snm.ku.dk
0045-28-75-13-09
University of Copenhagen

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
BMC Evolutionary Biology 2014
Paleontology: Oldest representative of a weird arthropod group
Biologists at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet in Munich have assigned a number of 435-million-year-old fossils to a new genus of predatory arthropods. These animals lived in shallow marine habitats and were far less eye-catching than related forms found in Jurassic strata.

Contact: Luise Dirscherl
presse@lmu.de
0049-892-180-3423
Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Molecular Cell
Research shows how premalignant cells can sense oncogenesis and halt growth
What happens inside cells when they detect the activation of a cancer-inducing gene? Sometimes, cells are able to signal internally to stop the cell cycle. Such cells are able to enter, at least for a time, a protective non-growth state. CSHL experiments now show how cells can respond to an activated RAS gene by entering a quiescent state called senescence.
National Institutes of Health, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Cancer Center Support Grant, Fonds de Recherche de l'Institut de Cardiologie de Montréal; Heart and Stroke Foundation-Québec

Contact: Peter Tarr
tarr@cshl.edu
516-367-8455
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Canadians rank highly when it comes to public science knowledge, attitudes, and engagement
A new expert panel report, Science Culture: Where Canada Stands, released today by the Council of Canadian Academies, helps to paint the clearest picture of Canada's science culture and science culture support system in 25 years. The expert panel who conducted the assessment found Canadians excel in public science knowledge, attitudes, and engagement; however they also determined there is room for improvement in some areas, including skills development.

Contact: Cathleen Meechan
cathleen.meechan@scienceadvice.ca
613-567-5000 x228
Council of Canadian Academies

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Psychology & Health
How does it feel to be old in different societies?
People aged 70 and over who identify themselves as 'old' feel worse about their own health in societies where they perceive they have lower value than younger age groups.

Contact: Martin Herrema
M.J.Herrema@kent.ac.uk
44-012-278-23581
University of Kent

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Nature
Quantum physics enables revolutionary imaging method
Researchers from the Institute for Quantum Optics and Quantum Information, the Vienna Center for Quantum Science and Technology, and the University of Vienna have developed a fundamentally new quantum imaging technique with strikingly counter-intuitive features. For the first time, an image has been obtained without ever detecting the light that was used to illuminate the imaged object, while the light revealing the image never touches the imaged object.

Contact: Gabriela Barreto Lemos
gabriela.barreto.lemos@univie.ac.at
43-699-192-55014
University of Vienna

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Biological Psychiatry
Dyslexic readers have disrupted network connections in the brain
Dyslexia, the most commonly diagnosed learning disability in the United States, is a neurological reading disability that occurs when the regions of the brain that process written language don't function normally.

Contact: Rhiannon Bugno
Biol.Psych@utsouthwestern.edu
214-648-0880
Elsevier

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Clinical Oncology
Research demonstrates potential method to better control lung cancer using radiotherapy
Researchers at the University of Manchester and the Christie NHS Foundation Trust -- both part of the Manchester Cancer Research Centre -- have looked at ways to personalize and increase the dose to the tumor while minimizing the effect on healthy tissue.

Contact: Alison Barbuti
alison.barbuti@manchester.ac.uk
44-161-275-8383
University of Manchester

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Rheumatology
Arthritis patients failing to take expensive medication, according to new research
Large numbers of people with severe rheumatoid arthritis are failing to take expensive medication as prescribed, according to a new multicenter study led by researchers in Manchester.
Arthritis Research UK

Contact: Ali Barbuti
alison.barbuti@manchester.ac.uk
44-161-275-8383
University of Manchester

Showing releases 251-275 out of 407.

<< < 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 > >>