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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 251-275 out of 431.

<< < 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 > >>

Public Release: 28-Oct-2014
Geology
Glacier song
Mountain glaciers represent one of the largest repositories of fresh water in alpine regions. However, little is known about the processes by which water moves through these systems. In this study published in Geology on 24 Oct. 2014, David S. Heeszel and colleagues use seismic recordings collected near Lake Gornersee in the Swiss Alps to look for signs of water moving through fractures near the glacier bed.

Contact: Kea Giles
kgiles@geosociety.org
Geological Society of America

Public Release: 28-Oct-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
UC Davis scientists discover exact receptor for DEET that repels mosquitoes
The odorant receptor that makes DEET repellant to mosquitoes has been identified by a research team led by the University of California, Davis.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Pat Bailey
pjbailey@ucdavis.edu
530-752-9843
University of California - Davis

Public Release: 28-Oct-2014
Science
Figuring out how we get the nitrogen we need
Caltech chemists have taken a crucial step toward unlocking the mystery of how bacteria use an enzyme called nitrogenase to convert nitrogen -- an essential component of all living systems -- from the inert molecule found in the atmosphere to a form that living systems can use.

Contact: Deborah Williams-Hedges
debwms@caltech.edu
626-395-3227
California Institute of Technology

Public Release: 28-Oct-2014
NASA gets a stare from Cyclone Nilofar's 14 mile-wide eye
Tropical Cyclone Nilofar developed an eye on Oct. 28 that seemed to stare at NASA's Terra satellite as it passed overhead in space. Warnings are already in effect from the India Meteorological Department as Nilofar is forecast to make landfall in northwestern India.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 28-Oct-2014
Cancer Research
Improving breast cancer chemo by testing patient's tumors in a dish
A team of biomedical engineers have developed a technique that monitors the response of 3-D chunks of a patient's tumor to determine how effective different anti-cancer drugs will be before starting chemotherapy.

Contact: David Salisbury
david.salisbury@vanderbilt.edu
615-343-6803
Vanderbilt University

Public Release: 28-Oct-2014
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
A battle for ant sperm
In a discovery new to science, research from the University of Vermont shows that sexual conflict between two ant species can drive an evolutionary battle, leading to competing adaptations in which female ants of one species manhandle sperm away from the unwitting males of a different species.

Contact: Joshua Brown
joshua.e.brown@uvm.edu
802-656-3039
University of Vermont

Public Release: 28-Oct-2014
Annals of Oncology
European consensus on methodological recommendations for clinical studies in rare cancers
One out of every five new cancer patients is diagnosed with a rare cancer, yet the clinical evidence needed to effectively treat these rare cancer patients is scarce. Rare cancers require alternative ways to conceive study designs and to analyze data.

Contact: John Bean
john.bean@eortc.be
European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer

Public Release: 28-Oct-2014
Remnants of tropical depression soaking Central America
NASA's Terra satellite passed over Tropical Storm Hanna on Oct. 27 when it made landfall near the northern Nicaragua and southern Honduras border.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 28-Oct-2014
Ana's remnants raining and gusting in British Columbia, Canada
NOAA's GOES-West satellite captured an image of post-tropical cyclone Ana's remnant clouds raining on British Columbia, Canada today, Oct. 28. Wind warnings along some coastal sections of British Columbia continued today as the storm moved through the region.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 28-Oct-2014
Allergy
Breathe easier: Get your D
Asthma, which inflames and narrows the airways, has become more common in recent years. While there is no known cure, asthma can be managed with medication and by avoiding allergens and other triggers. A new study by a Tel Aviv University researcher points to a convenient, free way to manage acute asthmatic episodes -- catching some rays outside.

Contact: George Hunka
ghunka@aftau.org
212-742-9070
American Friends of Tel Aviv University

Public Release: 28-Oct-2014
Canadian Journal of Cardiology
Governments should take active lead to create healthy food environments to prevent CVD
Canadian health organizations are calling upon governments to take a leadership role in creating healthy food environments. They say that implementing strategies that facilitate access to affordable healthy foods and beverages in places where Canadians work, live, and play could play a key role in preventing diet-related disease and health risk such as obesity and hypertension, and ultimately improve cardiovascular health, This call for action is published in the Canadian Journal of Cardiology.

Contact: Eileen Leahy
cjcmedia@elsevier.com
732-238-3628
Elsevier Health Sciences

Public Release: 28-Oct-2014
2014 American Phsyical Society Division of Plasma Physics Meeting
Insights into the physics of space weather that disrupts cell phones and creates Earthly havoc
The volatile 'solar wind' buffets the magnetosphere, the magnetic field that surrounds the Earth, and can whip up geomagnetic storms that disrupt cell phone service, damage satellites and blackout power grids. Precise predictions of such outbursts could prompt measures to cope with them, just as forecasts here on Earth warn of approaching hurricanes and thunderstorms.

Contact: Saralyn Stewart
stewart@physics.utexas.edu
512-694-2320
American Physical Society

Public Release: 28-Oct-2014
2014 American Phsyical Society Division of Plasma Physics Meeting
Postcards from the plasma edge
Scientists shed new light on how lithium conditions the volatile edge of fusion plasmas.

Contact: Saralyn Stewart
stewart@physics.utexas.edu
512-694-2320
American Physical Society

Public Release: 28-Oct-2014
American Journal of Gastroenterology
IU researchers: Blood test may help to diagnose pancreatic cancer
Indiana University cancer researchers have found that a simple blood test might help diagnose pancreatic cancer, one of the most deadly forms of the disease.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Michael Schug
maschug@iupui.edu
317-278-0953
Indiana University

Public Release: 28-Oct-2014
2014 American Phsyical Society Division of Plasma Physics Meeting
Laser experiments mimic cosmic explosions and planetary cores
Scientists bring plasma tsunamis and crushing pressures into the lab.

Contact: Saralyn Stewart
stewart@physics.utexas.edu
512-694-2320
American Physical Society

Public Release: 28-Oct-2014
2014 American Phsyical Society Division of Plasma Physics Meeting
Helping general electric upgrade the US power grid
PPPL lends GE a hand in developing an advanced power-conversion switch.

Contact: James Riordon
riordon@aps.org
301-209-3238
American Physical Society

Public Release: 28-Oct-2014
2014 American Phsyical Society Division of Plasma Physics Meeting
Using radio waves to control the density in a fusion plasma
Experiments show how heating the electrons in the center of a hot fusion plasma with high power microwaves can increase turbulence, reducing the density in the inner core.
US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Fusion Energy Sciences

Contact: James Riordon
301-209-3238
American Physical Society

Public Release: 28-Oct-2014
Journal of Neuroscience
New findings show that different brain tumors have the same origin
Glioma is a common name for serious brain tumors. Different types of glioma are usually diagnosed as separate diseases and have been considered to arise from different cell types in the brain. Now researchers at Uppsala University have shown that one and the same cell of origin can give rise to different types of glioma. This is important for the basic understanding of how these tumors are formed and can contribute to the development of more efficient and specific glioma therapies.

Contact: Lene Uhrbom
lene.uhrbom@igp.uu.se
46-184-715-063
Uppsala University

Public Release: 28-Oct-2014
2014 American Phsyical Society Division of Plasma Physics Meeting
Calming the plasma edge: The tail that wags the dog
Lithium injections show promise for optimizing the performance of fusion plasmas.

Contact: James Riordon
riordon@aps.org
301-209-3238
American Physical Society

Public Release: 28-Oct-2014
eLife
New insights into the development of ciliopathies
Diseases of the sensory or motile cilia play a key role in lung diseases or diabetes. Scientists at Helmholtz Zentrum München have now discovered the protein Flattop. It regulates the asymmetric positioning of cilia. Malfunctions in this process lead to different clinical phenotypes.

Contact: Press Office
presse@helmholtz-muenchen.de
49-893-187-2238
Helmholtz Zentrum München - German Research Center for Environmental Health

Public Release: 28-Oct-2014
Current Biology
Identifying the biological clock that governs female fertility
Researchers at the University of Gothenburg have identified the biological clock that governs female fertility. The discovery represents a major contribution to research aimed at finding medical approaches to treating infertility in women.

Contact: Kui Liu
46-708-887-793
University of Gothenburg

Public Release: 28-Oct-2014
Journal of Financial Intermediation
Do financial experts make better investments?
Financial experts do not make higher returns on their own investments than untrained investors, according to research by a Michigan State University business scholar.

Contact: Andy Henion
henion@msu.edu
517-355-3294
Michigan State University

Public Release: 28-Oct-2014
American Journal of Roentgenology
Lessons learned from SARS pandemic should inform current contagion protocols
Radiologists in Singapore outline the ways in which both medical facilities and practitioners there have incorporated lessons learned from the SARS pandemic.

Contact: Lissa D. Hurwitz
lhurwitz@arrs.org
703-858-4332
American Roentgen Ray Society

Public Release: 28-Oct-2014
Alzheimer's & Dementia
Self-reported sleep disturbances are linked to higher risk for Alzheimer's disease in men
In a new study, researchers from Uppsala University demonstrate that elderly men with self-reported sleep disturbances run a higher risk of developing Alzheimer's disease than men without self-reported sleep disturbances. The results are published in the scientific journal Alzheimer's & Dementia.
The Swedish Brain Foundation (Hjärnfonden), Novo Nordisk Foundation

Contact: Christian Benedict
christian.benedict@neuro.uu.se
46-070-425-0215
Uppsala University

Public Release: 28-Oct-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Researchers prove accuracy of mobile phone population mapping
A study by an international team, including the University of Southampton, has shown population maps based on anonymous mobile phone call record data can be as accurate as those based on censuses.

Contact: Glenn Harris
G.Harris@soton.ac.uk
44-023-805-93212
University of Southampton

Showing releases 251-275 out of 431.

<< < 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 > >>