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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 251-275 out of 457.

<< < 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 > >>

Public Release: 18-Jul-2014
Revista Komputer Sapiens
New inexpensive and easy computer software provides real-time and highly accurate data on traffic
Researchers at the University of Granada have designed new software that provides real time data on traffic. It is a device that provides information on traffic flow between cities. Drivers can use this information to choose the fastest route as they plan to drive to their destinations.

Contact: Pedro A. Castillo
pacv@ugr.es
34-958-240-589
University of Granada

Public Release: 18-Jul-2014
Cell
A new cellular garbage control pathway with relevance for human neurodegenerative diseases
Several human neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Huntington's disease, are linked to an accumulation of abnormal and aggregated proteins in cells. Cellular 'garbage' can be removed from cells by sweeping them to a cellular recycling station known as the lysosome. Scientists at the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry in Germany now discovered a new family of helper proteins that recognize labeled protein waste and guide them efficiently to the lysosome for destruction and recycling.

Contact: Anja Konschak
konschak@biochem.mpg.de
0049-898-578-2824
Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry

Public Release: 18-Jul-2014
Protein & Cell
Novel mechanism for invasion of EV71 virus demonstrated
Researchers from the Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, reported in a study published in Springer's open access journal Protein & Cell a novel mechanism for EV71 entry mediated by its receptor SCARB2. These findings make a significant conceptual advance in the understanding of non-enveloped virus entry, to which EV71 belongs.
National Basic Research Program, The National Natural Science Foundation of China, The Strategic Priority Research Program of the Chinese Academy of Sciences

Contact: Laura Zimmermann
laura.zimmermann@springer.com
49-622-148-78414
Springer

Public Release: 18-Jul-2014
Nature Communications
New material puts a twist in light
Scientists at The Australian National University have uncovered the secret to twisting light at will.

Contact: Philip Dooley
media@anu.edu.au
026-125-7979
Australian National University

Public Release: 18-Jul-2014
Special Publications of the Museum of Texas Tech University
Four new species of tuco-tucos identified from Bolivia
A research team led by Scott Gardner of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln have identified four new species of Ctenomys, a genus of gopher-like mammals found throughout much of South America. The burrowing rodents are commonly called tuco-tucos.

Contact: Scott Gardner
slg@unl.edu
402-472-3334
University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Public Release: 18-Jul-2014
Nature Communications
'Support' cells in brain play important role in Down syndrome
Researchers from UC Davis School of Medicine and Shriners Hospitals for Children -- Northern California have identified a group of cells in the brain that they say plays an important role in the abnormal neuron development in Down syndrome.
NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Multiple Sclerosis Society, Shriners Hospitals for Children, California Institute for Regenerative Medicine, Memorial Hermann Foundation (Staman Ogilvie Fund), Bents

Contact: Charles Casey
charles.casey@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu
916-734-9048
University of California - Davis Health System

Public Release: 18-Jul-2014
GSA Bulletin
Catastrophic debris avalanches -- a second volcanic hazard
Volcanic hazards aren't limited to eruptions. Debris avalanche landslides can also cause a great deal of damage and loss of life. Stratovolcanoes, with their steep, conical shapes made up of lava and unconsolidated mixed materials, can reach a critical point of instability when they overgrow their flanks. This leads to partial collapse, and the product of this slope failure is a large-scale, rapid mass movement known as a catastrophic landslide or debris avalanche.

Contact: Kea Giles
kgiles@geosociety.org
Geological Society of America

Public Release: 18-Jul-2014
Robotics: Science and Systems
Getting a grip on robotic grasp
Researchers at MIT have developed a robot that enhances the grasping motion of the human hand.

Contact: Sarah McDonnell
s_mcd@mit.edu
617-253-8923
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 18-Jul-2014
Cell Reports
Bowel cancer breakthrough may benefit thousands of patients
Researchers at Queen's University have made a significant breakthrough that may benefit patients with bowel cancer. Dr Sandra van Schaeybroeck and her team have discovered how two genes cause bowel cancer cells to become resistant to treatments used against the disease. The research, which was funded by Cancer Research UK, was published this month in the prestigious international journal Cell Reports.

Contact: Claire O'Callaghan
c.ocallaghan@qub.ac.uk
Queen's University Belfast

Public Release: 18-Jul-2014
PLOS ONE
Antipsychotic drugs linked to slight decrease in brain volume
A study published today has confirmed a link between antipsychotic medication and a slight, but measureable, decrease in brain volume in patients with schizophrenia. For the first time, researchers have been able to examine whether this decrease is harmful for patients' cognitive function and symptoms, and noted that over a nine year follow-up, this decrease did not appear to have any effect.
Academy of Finland, Medical Research Council, Sigrid Jusélius Foundation, Brain and Behavior Research Foundation

Contact: Craig Brierley
craig.brierley@admin.cam.ac.uk
44-012-237-66205
University of Cambridge

Public Release: 18-Jul-2014
Nature Communications
A new measure of biodiversity
A new approach to measuring biodiversity has uncovered some biologically important but currently unprotected areas in Western Australia, while confirming the significance of the world heritage listed Wet Tropics rainforests in the country's north-east. Phylogenetic analysis gives a much more complex and complete picture of the diversity of the genus Acacia, which includes Australia's floral emblem.

Contact: Linden Woodward
linden.woodward@jcu.edu.au
61-742-321-007
James Cook University

Public Release: 18-Jul-2014
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Autophagy protects insulin-secreting cells of the pancreas
Three new studies in Journal of Clinical Investigation identify a pathway that protects insulin-secreting β cells from a toxic form of islet amyloid polypeptide.

Contact: Corinne Williams
press_releases@the-jci.org
Journal of Clinical Investigation

Public Release: 18-Jul-2014
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Researchers characterize neurologic response associated with placebo effect
A new study in the Journal of Clinical Investigation identifies a neurological network that may predict which Parkinson's disease patients are likely to have a favorable response to sham surgery. Identification of this patient population may help researchers better evaluate clinical trial results.

Contact: Corinne Williams
press_releases@the-jci.org
Journal of Clinical Investigation

Public Release: 18-Jul-2014
Nature Communications
Scientists enlist big data to guide conservation efforts
Genetic studies have given us detailed information about the evolutionary relationships embodied in the Tree of Life, while newly digitized museum collections contain a wealth of information about species distribution. To date, however, these big data collections have not been applied to conservation efforts. University of California, Berkeley's Brent Mishler and Australian colleagues have created a model taking both distribution and relationships into account to identify lineages that need preservation, in particular rare endemics.
Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation

Contact: Robert Sanders
rlsanders@berkeley.edu
510-643-6998
University of California - Berkeley

Public Release: 18-Jul-2014
Journal of Clinical Investigation
New trigger for ovulation could make IVF safer
Researchers have successfully used a new and potentially safer method to stimulate ovulation in women undergoing IVF treatment.
Medical Research Council, National Institute for Health Research, Wellcome Trust

Contact: Sam Wong
sam.wong@imperial.ac.uk
44-207-594-2198
Imperial College London

Public Release: 17-Jul-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
How does L-carnitine maintain the normal structure of sciatic nerve in crush injury?
Several studies have demonstrated that L-carnitine exhibits neuroprotective effects on injured sciatic nerve of rats with diabetes mellitus. Dr. Ümmü Zeynep Avsar, Faculty of Medicine, Ataturk University, Turkey and his team proposed a hypothesis that L-carnitine exhibits neuroprotective effects on injured sciatic nerve of rats. Rat sciatic nerve was crush injured by a forceps and exhibited degenerative changes.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 17-Jul-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Intranasal nerve growth factor repairs injured spinal cord neurons
Nerve growth factor can be delivered to the brain by intranasal administration without risk for treatment of brain diseases. Dr. Luigi Aloe, Cellular Biology and Neurobiology Institute, National Research Council, Italy and his team performed a study to investigate whether, by intranasal administration, the nerve growth factor bypasses the blood-brain barrier and turns over the spinal cord neurons.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 17-Jul-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
A rhesus monkey model of radial nerve injury for evaluating peripheral nerve repair
Current research on bone marrow stem cell transplantation and autologous or xenogenic nerve transplantation for peripheral nerve regeneration has mainly focused on the repair of peripheral nerve defects in rodents. Dr. Dong Wang and his team, First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University, China established a standardized experimental model of 2.5 cm-long radial nerve defects in rhesus monkeys and evaluated the effect of repair on peripheral nerve injury. The quality of nerve regeneration in the bone marrow stem cells-laden allografts was comparable to that achieved with autografts.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 17-Jul-2014
National Science Review
PIWI proteins and piRNAs regulate genes in the germline and beyond
PIWI proteins associate with PIWI-interacting RNAs, which are a class of 24–32 nucleotide small non-coding RNAs. Current studies show that PIWI proteins and their interactors regulate piRNA biogenesis and diverse biological processes including transposon silencing, epigenetic programming, DNA rearrangements, mRNA turnover, and translational control, both in the germline and the soma. These discoveries on the PIWI-piRNA pathway have revealed an intriguing new dimension of sncRNA-mediated gene regulation in the cell.
National Institutes of Health, G. Harold & Leila Mathers Foundation, Ellison Medical Foundation Senior Scholar Award

Contact: Haifan Lin
haifan.lin@yale.edu
Science China Press

Public Release: 17-Jul-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
The human δ2 glutamate receptor gene is not mutated in spinocerebellar ataxia patients
Recent studies have demonstrated that glutamate receptor δ2 gene (GRID2) is closely related to cerebellar functions in mice. This gene is predominantly located in postsynaptic dendrites of parallel fiber–Purkinje cell synapses in the cerebellum and contains potential fragile sites within large introns. These fragile sites easily develop spontaneous mutation, which leads to Purkinje cell death, contributing to the manifestation of spinocerebellar ataxia in mice.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 17-Jul-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
The differentially expressed genes in DRG that influence neural regeneration after SNI
Slit-Robo GTPase-activating protein 3 contains a Rho GAP domain that regulates the activities of Rho family GTPases and affects actin polymerization, which influences dendrite elaboration, neurite outgrowth and axon guidance, contributing to neural regeneration. Anjie Lu, the Third Xiangya Hospital of Central South University, China and his team performed a microRNA microarray analysis and identified 23 microRNAs whose expression were significantly changed in rat dorsal root ganglia after sciatic nerve injury.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 17-Jul-2014
American Journal of Public Health
Weight management program also reduces depression among black women
An intervention program aimed at helping obese women maintain their weight without adding pounds also significantly reduced depression in nearly half the participants, according to a new study from Duke University.
National Institute for Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

Contact: Steve Hartsoe
steve.hartsoe@duke.edu
919-681-4515
Duke University

Public Release: 17-Jul-2014
PLOS ONE
In alcohol abusers, fish oil may reduce risk of neurodegeneration and ensuing dementia
Omega-3 fish oil might help protect against alcohol-related neurodamage and the risk of eventual dementia, according to a study published in the journal PLOS ONE.

Contact: Jim Ritter
jritter@lumc.edu
708-216-2445
Loyola University Health System

Public Release: 17-Jul-2014
Icarus
Lunar pits could shelter astronauts, reveal details of how 'man in the moon' formed
While the moon's surface is battered by millions of craters, it also has over 200 holes -- steep-walled pits that in some cases might lead to caves that future astronauts could explore and use for shelter, according to new observations from NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft.
NASA

Contact: Bill Steigerwald
william.a.steigerwald@nasa.gov
301-286-5017
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 17-Jul-2014
American Journal of Public Health
Older adults who walk out of necessity are at highest risk for outdoor falls
Older adults are at a greater danger of falling when walking for utilitarian purposes such as shopping and appointments than when walking for recreation, according to a study from UMass Medical School.

Contact: Lisa Larson
lisa.larson@umassmed.edu
508-856-2689
University of Massachusetts Medical School

Showing releases 251-275 out of 457.

<< < 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 > >>