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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 251-275 out of 537.

<< < 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 > >>

Public Release: 19-Nov-2014
Nature
Thin film produces new chemistry in 'nanoreactor'
Physicists at the University of Groningen led by Professor of Functional Nanomaterials Beatriz Noheda have discovered a new manganese compound that is produced by tension in the crystal structure of terbium manganese oxide. The technique they used to create this new material could open the way to new nanoscale circuits. Their findings were published on Nov. 20, 2014 in the journal Nature.
NanoNextNl, FOM Foundation for Fundamental Research on Matter.

Contact: Beatriz Noheda
b.noheda@rug.nl
31-503-634-440
University of Groningen

Public Release: 19-Nov-2014
Neurology
From architect to social worker: Complex jobs may protect memory and thinking later on
People whose jobs require more complex work with other people, such as social workers and lawyers, or with data, like architects or graphic designers, may end up having longer-lasting memory and thinking abilities compared to people who do less complex work, according to research published in the Nov. 19, 2014, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Contact: Rachel Seroka
rseroka@aan.com
612-928-6129
American Academy of Neurology

Public Release: 19-Nov-2014
Nature
Natural gut viruses join bacterial cousins in maintaining health and fighting infections
Microbiologists at NYU Langone Medical Center say they have what may be the first strong evidence that the natural presence of viruses in the gut -- or what they call the 'virome' -- plays a health-maintenance and infection-fighting role similar to that of the intestinal bacteria that dwell there and make up the 'microbiome.'

Contact: David March
david.march@nyumc.org
212-404-3528
NYU Langone Medical Center / New York University School of Medicine

Public Release: 19-Nov-2014
American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2014
Common blood pressure medication does not increase risk of breast cancer, study finds
Women who take a common type of medication to control their blood pressure are not at increased risk of developing breast cancer due to the drug, according to new study by researchers at the Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute in Murray, Utah.

Contact: Jess C. Gomez
jess.gomez@imail.org
801-507-7455
Intermountain Medical Center

Public Release: 19-Nov-2014
American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2014
Unhealthy behavior may be cross-generational
Unhealthy behavior may be cross-generational.

Contact: Karen Astle
karen.astle@heart.org
214-706-1392
American Heart Association

Public Release: 19-Nov-2014
American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2014
More children surviving dilated cardiomyopathy without heart transplant
More children are surviving dilated cardiomyopathy without a heart transplant.

Contact: Karen Astle
karen.astle@heart.org
214-706-1392
American Heart Association

Public Release: 19-Nov-2014
American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2014
New leadless pacemaker safe, reliable
A new leadless pacemaker is safe and reliable.

Contact: Karen Astle
karen.astle@heart.org
214-706-1392
American Heart Association

Public Release: 19-Nov-2014
American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2014
Surgeons use 3-D printed model of heart to treat patients with disorders
A 3-D printed model of the heart, combined with standard medical images, may help surgeons treat patients born with complicated heart disorders.

Contact: Bridgette McNeill
bridgette.mcneill@heart.org
214-706-1135
American Heart Association

Public Release: 19-Nov-2014
American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2014
Speedy heart transplant for kids better than waiting for perfect match
Survival is predicted to be higher for pediatric heart transplant candidates when the first suitable donor offer is accepted -- even if they have antibodies that may lead to organ rejection. Costs of care are lower for children who don't wait for an antibody-matched heart. Researchers say the decision to perform a heart transplant should not depend solely upon the patient's antibodies.
NIH/National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Bridgette McNeill
bridgette.mcneill@heart.org
214-706-1135
American Heart Association

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
AHA Scientific Sessions 2014
Handheld ultrasound technology can help medical students improve their physical diagnosis
A new study by researchers from Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai found that training medical students to use a handheld ultrasound device can enhance the accuracy of their physical diagnosis.

Contact: Lauren Woods
lauren.woods@mountsinai.org
646-634-0869
The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
Journal of General Internal Medicine
Suffering from constipation? Self-acupressure can help
In a randomized clinical trial, 72 percent of participants said that perineal self-acupressure, a simple technique involving the application of external pressure to the perineum -- the area between the anus and genitals -- helped relieve constipation.
Annenberg Foundation, Gerald Oppenheimer Family Foundation, Panda Foundation, Yale University

Contact: Enrique Rivero
erivero@mednet.ucla.edu
310-794-2273
University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
Nature Chemistry
UCLA biochemists build largest synthetic molecular 'cage' ever
University of California Los Angeles biochemists have created the largest protein ever that self-assembles into a molecular cage. Their designed protein, which does not exist in nature, is hundreds of times smaller than a human cell. The research could lead to 'synthetic vaccines' that protect people from the flu, HIV and perhaps other diseases. It could also lead to new methods of delivering pharmaceuticals inside of cells and the creation of new nano-scale materials.

Contact: Stuart Wolpert
swolpert@support.ucla.edu
310-206-0511
University of California - Los Angeles

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
American Heart Association 2014
New England Journal of Medicine
Investigational drug may offer another option to treat Marfan syndrome
A New England Journal of Medicine paper co-authored by Angela Sharkey, M.D., professor of pediatrics at Saint Louis University, found Losartan and high dose Atenolol work equally well in treating Marfan syndrome.
U01 grants from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), grant numbers HL068269, HL068270, HL068279, HL068281, HL068285, HL068292, HL068290, HL068288 and HL085057; the U.S. Food and Drug Administration Office of Orphan Products Development;

Contact: Nancy Solomon
solomonn@slu.edu
314-977-8017
Saint Louis University

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
FASEB Journal
New laser therapy helps slow macular degeneration
A new, low impact low energy laser treatment for patients with early age-related macular degeneration has produced positive results by reducing indicators of the disease.

Contact: Anne Rahilly
arahilly@unimelb.edu.au
61-390-355-380
University of Melbourne

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
26th EORTC-NCI-AACR Symposium on Molecular Targets and Cancer Therapeutics
Trial shows treatment-resistant advanced non-small cell lung cancer responds to rociletinib
A new drug that targets not only common cancer-causing genetic mutations in patients with non-small cell lung cancer, but also a form of the mutation that causes resistance to treatment, has shown promising results in patients in a phase I/II clinical trial. The research will be presented at the 26th EORTC-NCI-AACR Symposium meeting in Barcelona, Spain.
Clovis Oncology

Contact: Emma Mason
wordmason@mac.com
44-137-656-3090
ECCO-the European CanCer Organisation

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology
Peanut in household dust linked to peanut allergies, especially for children with eczema
Exposure to peanut proteins in household dust may be a trigger of peanut allergy, according to a study published today in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

Contact: Johanna Younghans
johanna.younghans@mountsinai.org
212-241-5093
The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
Journal of the American Chemical Society
Scientists get to the heart of fool's gold as a solar material
As the installation of photovoltaic solar cells continues to accelerate, scientists are looking for inexpensive materials beyond the traditional silicon that can efficiently convert sunlight into electricity. Theoretically, iron pyrite could do the job, but when it works at all, the conversion efficiency remains frustratingly low. Now, a University of Wisconsin-Madison research team explains why that is, in a discovery that suggests how improvements in this promising material could lead to inexpensive yet efficient solar cells.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Song Jin
jin@chem.wisc.edu
608-262-1562
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
Journal of Neuroscience
Penn-led team prevents memory problems caused by sleep deprivation
In a new study, published in the Journal of Neuroscience, a team led by scientists from the University of Pennsylvania found that a particular set of cells in a small region of the brain are responsible for memory problems after sleep loss. By selectively increasing levels of a signaling molecule in these cells, the researchers prevented mice from having memory deficits.
Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research, University Research Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Katherine Unger Baillie
kbaillie@upenn.edu
215-898-9194
University of Pennsylvania

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
Papers in Palaeontology
Ancient New Zealand 'Dawn Whale' identified by Otago researchers
University of Otago palaeontologists are rewriting the history of New Zealand's ancient whales by describing a previously unknown genus of fossil baleen whales and two species within it.

Contact: Robert Boessenecker
robert.boessenecker@otago.ac.nz
University of Otago

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
American Journal of Roentgenology
New protocol for imaging patients with Ebola
A new protocol is facilitating safer portable computed radiography of patients with Ebola.

Contact: Lissa D. Hurwitz
lhurwitz@arrs.org
703-858-4332
American Roentgen Ray Society

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
Physical Review Letters
Paramecia need Newton for navigation
While single-celled paramecia have the ability to respond to certain external stimuli, they appear not to use that sensory system for simple navigation, new research finds. The work suggests that the ability of paramecia to navigate around flat surfaces is entirely governed by Newton's Third Law of Motion and not by active behavior. The finding, reported in Physical Review Letters, raises interesting evolutionary questions.

Contact: Kevin Stacey
kevin_stacey@brown.edu
401-863-3766
Brown University

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
American Heart Association
American Journal of Cardiology
Vanderbilt study finds nationwide decline in one type of serious heart attack
The most emergent form of heart attacks is decreasing nationwide, but this declining incidence could affect emergency departments' quality and timeliness of care.
NIH/National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute

Contact: Jennifer Wetzel
Jennifer.wetzel@vanderbilt.edu
615-322-4747
Vanderbilt University Medical Center

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
Canadian Journal of Cardiology
Why we need to fund newer blood-thinning agents to prevent strokes
Care gaps are emerging due to disharmony between healthcare reimbursement policies and evidence-based clinical guideline recommendations, cautions a group of Canadian physicians. Writing in the Canadian Journal of Cardiology, they use the example of stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation to make a case for engaging with policy-makers to address the growing barriers to patients' access to optimal care.

Contact: Eileen Leahy
cjcmedia@elsevier.com
732-238-3628
Elsevier Health Sciences

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
Blood
Some heparin-allergic patients could have urgent heart surgery sooner with combination of appropriate blood screenings and therapeutic plasma exchange
McMaster University researchers have found new evidence that suggests patients with a history of adverse reaction to the blood thinner heparin may be ready for urgent heart surgery sooner with a combination of appropriate blood screenings and therapeutic plasma exchange.
none

Contact: Veronica McGuire
vmcguir@mcmaster.ca
90-552-591-402-2169
McMaster University

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
Ecography
Fossils cast doubt on climate-change projections on habitats
Leave it to long-dead short-tailed shrew and flying squirrels to outfox climate-modelers trying to predict future habitats.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Jim Barlow
jebarlow@uoregon.edu
541-346-3481
University of Oregon

Showing releases 251-275 out of 537.

<< < 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 > >>