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Showing releases 251-275 out of 421.

<< < 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 > >>

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Journal of Management Accounting Research
Narcissistic CEOs and financial performance
Narcissism, considered by some as the 'dark side of the executive personality,' may actually be a good thing when it comes to certain financial measures, with companies led by narcissistic CEOs outperforming those helmed by non-narcissistic executives, according to recent research co-authored by faculty at the USC Marshall School of Business.

Contact: Amy Blume
amyblume@marshall.usc.edu
213-740-5552
USC Marshall School of Business

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Pattern Recognition Letters
Artificial intelligence identifies the musical progression of the Beatles
Computer scientists at Lawrence Technological University have developed an artificial intelligence algorithm that can analyze and compare musical styles, which they have used to study the musical progression of the Beatles.

Contact: Lior Shamir
lshamir@ltu.edu
248-204-3512
Lawrence Technological University

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Rutgers study explores attitudes, preferences toward post-Sandy rebuilding
A year-long Rutgers study found that individual property owners in Sandy-affected towns are skeptical about the likelihood of community-based rebuilding solutions. 45 percent of 400-plus respondents are pessimistic their towns would be rebuilt better than they were before Sandy.
New Jersey Recovery Fund

Contact: Steve Manas
smanas@ucm.rutgers.edu
848-932-0559
Rutgers University

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
Early warning sign for babies at risk of autism
Researchers at the University of Miami find that early joint attention -- such as making eye contact to communicate about a toy, without smiling -- predicts later autism symptoms. The findings help identify children that can benefit from early interventions

Contact: Annette Gallagher
a.gallagher1@umiami.edu
305-284-1121
University of Miami

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Journal of the Air and Water Association
Study gives new perspective on agricultural plastic, debris burning, and air quality
A recent study published in the Journal of the Air and Water Association shows that inclusion of agricultural plastic in debris piles has no effect on smoke emissions.

Contact: Walita Kay Williams
walitakwilliams@fs.fed.us
510-559-6367
USDA Forest Service - Pacific Southwest Research Station

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Cell Reports
Piggy-backing cells hold clue to skin cancer growth
Skin Cancer cells work together to spread further and faster, according to a new study published in Cell Reports.
Cancer Research UK

Contact: Alan Worsley
Alan.Worsley@cancer.org.uk
Cancer Research UK

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
American Journal of Epidemiology
Joblessness could kill you, but recessions could be good for your health
While previous studies of individuals have shown that employees who lose their jobs have a higher mortality rate, more comprehensive studies have shown, unexpectedly, that population mortality actually declines as unemployment rates increase. Researchers from Drexel University and the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor set out to better understand these seemingly contradictory findings.
NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Contact: Alex McKechnie
ahm62@drexel.edu
215-895-2705
Drexel University

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Cell Stem Cell
Whitehead Institute researchers create 'naïve' pluripotent human embryonic stem cells
Embryonic stem cell research has been hampered by the inability to transfer research and tools from mouse ESC studies to their human counterparts, in part because human ESCs are 'primed' and slightly less plastic than the mouse cells. Now researchers in the lab of Whitehead Institute Founding Member Rudolf Jaenisch have discovered how to manipulate and maintain human ESCs into a 'na´ve' or base pluripotent state similar to that of mouse ESCs without the use of any reprogramming factors.
Simons Foundation, National Institutes of Health, Sir Henry Wellcome Postdoctoral Fellowship, Boehringer Ingelheim Fonds PhD Fellowship, Jerome and Florence Brill Graduate Student Fellowship

Contact: Nicole Giese Rura
rura@wi.mit.edu
617-258-6851
Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Fukushima accident underscores need for US to seek out new information about nuclear plant hazards
A new congressionally mandated report from the National Academy of Sciences concludes that the overarching lesson learned from the 2011 Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident is that nuclear plant licensees and their regulators must actively seek out and act on new information about hazards with the potential to affect the safety of nuclear plants.
Nuclear Regulatory Commission

Contact: Jennifer Walsh
news@nas.edu
202-334-2138
National Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Psychological Science
Cultural stereotypes may evolve from sharing social information
Cultural stereotypes may be an unintended but inevitable consequence of sharing social information, according to research published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. Information about people that is initially complex and difficult to remember evolves into a simple system of category stereotypes that can be learned easily as it is shared from person to person.
Economic and Social Research Council

Contact: Anna Mikulak
amikulak@psychologicalscience.org
202-293-9300
Association for Psychological Science

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Fires in Central Africa during July 2014
Hundreds of fires covered central Africa in mid-July 2014, as the annual fire season continues across the region.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Journal of Pediatric Urology
Continuous antibiotics not necessary for many children with common prenatal abnormality
Up to 5 percent of all prenatal ultrasounds uncover antenatal hydronephrosis, or enlarged kidneys, the most commonly detected prenatal abnormality in the US. Many children with this abnormality are treated continually with preventive antibiotics for the first few years of life with the hopes of preventing the condition's associated urinary tract infections. But a new study found that, in most cases, continuous antibiotics for these children are unnecessary.

Contact: Gina Bericchia
MediaRelations@NationwideChildrens.org
614-355-0495
Nationwide Children's Hospital

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Environmental Pollution
Corn and soy insecticides similar to nicotine found widespread in Midwest rivers -- USGS news
Insecticides similar to nicotine, known as neonicotinoids, were found commonly in streams throughout the Midwest, according to a new USGS study. This is the first broad-scale investigation of neonicotinoid insecticides in the Midwestern United States and one of the first conducted within the United States.
US Geological Survey Toxic Substances Hydrology Program

Contact: Alex Demas
apdemas@usgs.gov
703-648-4421
United States Geological Survey

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
American Journal of Roentgenology
New radiological signs of gastric lap band slippage identified
Researchers in Ohio and Rhode Island have identified two previously undescribed radiological signs of potentially life-threatening slippage of laparoscopically adjustable gastric bands.

Contact: Lissa D. Hurwitz
lhurwitz@arrs.org
703-858-4332
American Roentgen Ray Society

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
ZooKeys
A tiny new species of frog from Brazil with a heroic name
Molecular analysis helps scientists discover and describe a tiny new species of narrow-mouthed frog from the genus Chiasmocleis. The news species, Chiasmocleis quilombola is named after the quilombos -- communities constituted by and used as refuges for slaves who had the brevity to escape in colonial Brazil. The study was published in the open-access journal ZooKeys.

Contact: João F. R. Tonini
jfrtonini@gmail.com
Pensoft Publishers

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Journal of Traumatic Stress
Teens pay high psychiatric toll when raised in conditions of political conflict
A new study by Professor Michelle Slone of Tel Aviv University finds that Israeli youths exposed to protracted conflict suffer far higher levels of anxiety, phobia, fear, depression, obsessive-compulsive symptoms, and paranoia than their counterparts in the US. The largest cross-sectional empirical study of its kind, the research assessed youths exposed to terrorism, missile attacks, war, forced residential relocations, and military operations.

Contact: George Hunka
ghunka@aftau.org
212-742-9070
American Friends of Tel Aviv University

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Oncotarget
Metastatic brain tumor treatment could be on the horizon with use of SapC-DOPS
A Cincinnati Cancer Center study, published in the advance online edition of the journal Oncotarget, provides hope that previously studied SapC-DOPS could be used for treatment of brain cancer that has spread.
UC Brain Tumor Molecular Therapeutics Program, UC College of Medicine, National Institutes of Health, New Drug State Key Project

Contact: Katie Pence
katie.pence@uc.edu
513-558-4561
University of Cincinnati Academic Health Center

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Cell Reports
Identified a key molecule in flies that adjusts energy use under starvation conditions
In the study, published today in Cell Reports, the IRB Barcelona scientists show that in the fly Drosophila melanogaster, p53 is activated in certain cells to adapt the metabolic response to nutrient deprivation, thus having a global effect on the organism.

Contact: Sonia Armengou
armengou@irbbarcelona.org
34-934-037-255
Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona)

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Journal of Behavioral and Developmental Pediatrics
Background TV can be bad for kids
Leaving the television on can be detrimental to children's learning and development, according to a new study from the University of Iowa. Researchers found that background television can divert a child's attention from play and learning. Results appear in the Journal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics.
Department of Education, Corporation for Public Broadcasting, Public Broadcasting System for the Ready to Learn Initiative

Contact: Richard Lewis
richard-c-lewis@uiowa.edu
319-384-0012
University of Iowa

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Chest
CDC reports annual financial cost of COPD to be $36 billion in the United States
American College of Chest Physicians announced today the online first publication of 'Total and state-specific medical and absenteeism costs of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease among adults aged ≥18 years in the United States for 2010 and projections through 2020.'

Contact: Kristi Bruno
kbruno@chestnet.org
773-750-9962
American College of Chest Physicians

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Cell Reports
A world first: Researchers identify a treatment that prevents tumor metastasis
Metastasis, the strategy adopted by tumor cells to transform into an aggressive form of cancer, are often associated with a gloomy prognosis. Managing to block the metastasis or to prevent their formation would be a giant step towards the fight against cancer. Researchers at UniversitÚ catholique de Louvain in Belgium successfully performed this world first on models of human tumors in mice. The results of their study were published in the prestigious journal Cell Reports.
European Research Council Starting Grant, Fond de la Recherche Scientifique, Fondation Contre le Cancer

Contact: Prof. Pierre Sonveaux
pierre.sonveaux@uclouvain.be
32-495-251-739
UniversitÚ catholique de Louvain

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Nature Communications
University of Delaware researcher describes new approach for creating organic zeolites
In a landmark paper published in the international scientific journal Nature Communications, University of Delaware researcher Yushan Yan describes a new approach to creating organic zeolites.

Contact: Donna O'Brien
dobrien@udel.edu
University of Delaware

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
European Physical Journal B
Unleashing the power of quantum dot triplets
Quantum computers have yet to materialize. Yet, scientists are making progress in devising suitable means of making such computers faster. One such approach relies on quantum dots -- a kind of artificial atom, easily controlled by applying an electric field. A new study published in European Physical Journal B demonstrates that changing the coupling of three coherently coupled quantum dots with electrical impulses can help better control them.

Contact: Laura Zimmermann
laura.zimmermann@springer.com
49-622-148-78414
Springer

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Addiction
Warning: Birthdays can be bad for your health
New research has found that birthday-related drinking is associated with upsurges in hospital admissions among young people. This study of drinking behavior in Ontario, Canada, was published online in the scientific journal Addiction.

Contact: Nicole Weingartner
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
201-748-5808
Wiley

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Immunity
Experiments prove 'stemness' of individual immune memory cells
Researchers in Germany and the US have proven for the first time that specific individual immune cells, termed 'central memory T cells,' have all the essential characteristics of adult tissue stem cells. Such cells can perpetuate themselves indefinitely and generate diverse offspring that can reconstitute 'tissue' function. These findings indicate that it should be possible to fully restore specific immunity to pathogens in immunocompromised patients by substitution of small numbers of these T cells.
German Research Foundation, Helmholtz Alliance on Immunotherapy of Cancer, German Federal Ministry of Education and Research, National Science Foundation

Contact: Vera Siegler
vera.siegler@tum.de
49-892-892-2731
Technische Universitaet Muenchen

Showing releases 251-275 out of 421.

<< < 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 > >>