Choose Help The Kavli Prize

EurekAlert!, a service of AAAS
Home About us
Advanced Search
25-Oct-2014 12:12
US Eastern Time

Username:

Password:

Register

Forgot Password?

Press Releases

Breaking News

Science Business

Grants, Awards, Books

Meetings

Multimedia

Science Agencies
on EurekAlert!

US Department of Energy

US National Institutes of Health

US National Science Foundation

Calendar

Submit a Calendar Item

Subscribe/Sponsor

Links & Resources

Portals

RSS Feeds

Accessibility Option On

Breaking News
US Department of Energy
US National Institutes of Health
US National Science Foundation


Arabic

Breaking News

Titles Only 

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 251-275 out of 470.

<< < 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 > >>

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
GSA 2014 Annual Meeting
Kung fu stegosaur
Stegosaurs might be portrayed as lumbering plant eaters, but they were lethal fighters when necessary, according to paleontologists who have uncovered new evidence of a casualty of stegosaurian combat. The evidence is a fatal stab wound in the pubis bone of a predatory allosaur. The wound -- in the conical shape of a stegosaur tail spike -- would have required great dexterity to inflict and shows clear signs of having cut short the allosaur's life.

Contact: Christa Stratton
cstratton@geosociety.org
778-331-7625
Geological Society of America

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Perceived hatred fuels conflicts between Democrats and Republicans, Israelis and Palestinians
A new study published in the Proceedings of the National Academic of Sciences by a team of researchers from The New School for Social Research, Northwestern University and Boston College demonstrates how seemingly unsolvable political and ethnic conflicts are fueled by asymmetrical perceptions of opponents' motivations -- and that these tensions can be relieved by providing financial incentives to better understand what drives an adversary group.
Northwestern University, Boston College, Dispute Resolution Research Center at Kellogg School of Management, National Science Foundation, Office of Naval Research

Contact: Sam Biederman
sam.biederman@newschool.edu
212-229-5667 x3094
The New School

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
UEG Week 2014
Promising blood biomarkers identified for colorectal cancer: Is a screening blood test within reach?
The search for blood-borne biomarkers that could be used to screen for colorectal cancer (CRC) has uncovered two promising candidates that may one day lead to the development of a simple blood test. Scientists have been piecing together the molecular events involved in the development of CRC and have identified abnormal DNA methylation patterns and the presence of microRNAs as major players in the carcinogenic process.

Contact: Samantha Forster
samantha@spinkhealth.com
01-444-811-099
Spink Health

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Journal of Food Science
Color and texture matter most when it comes to tomatoes
A new study in the Journal of Food Science, published by the Institute of Food Technologists, evaluated consumers' choice in fresh tomato selection and revealed which characteristics make the red fruit most appealing.

Contact: Stephanie Callahan
scallahan@ift.org
312-604-0273
Institute of Food Technologists

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
The Accounting Review
Less-numerate investors swayed by corporate report presentation effects
Less-numerate investors are more susceptible to style and presentation effects in corporate social responsibility reports, according to research from W. Brooke Elliott, the Roedgers Fellow in Accountancy and Professor Ken Perry Faculty Fellow at the College of Business.

Contact: Phil Ciciora
pciciora@illinois.edu
217-333-2177
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
NASA's Aqua satellite sees Tropical Storm Ana still affecting Hawaii
Slow-moving Tropical Storm Ana was still affecting parts of Hawaii on Oct. 20 when NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead from its orbit in space.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Dissertations and Features
Unconventional experimental design
Over two years of observation McRae, working closely with professor of biology Steven Green, found that he could quite accurately predict what type of predator was threatening a squirrel by analyzing its sounds and tail movements.

Contact: Annette Gallagher
a.gallagher1@umiami.edu
305-284-1121
University of Miami

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
NASA sees Gonzalo affect Bermuda's ocean sediment: Stirred, not shaken
NASA's Aqua and Terra satellites captured before and after images of Bermuda and surrounding waters before and after Hurricane Gonzalo struck the island on Oct. 17.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Sweet science: How chemistry makes your treats sweet (video)
It's National Chemistry Week, and this year's theme is the sweetest of all: candy. Whether it's ice cream, candy bars, pudding or cake, we love our sweets. But why do those treats actually taste sweet? Whether they're made with sugar or artificial sweeteners, it all comes down to chemistry. Find out more here: http://youtu.be/FaBFyEa8-eI.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
NOAA team discovers 2 vessels from WWII convoy battle off North Carolina
A team of researchers led by NOAA's Office of National Marine Sanctuaries have discovered two significant vessels from World War II's Battle of the Atlantic. The German U-boat 576 and the freighter Bluefields were found approximately 30 miles off the coast of North Carolina. Lost for more than 70 years, the discovery of the two vessels, in an area known as the Graveyard of the Atlantic, is a rare window into a historic military battle and the underwater battlefield landscape of WWII.
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, UNC-Coastal Studies Institute, National Park Service

Contact: Lauren Heesemann
lauren.heesemann@noaa.gov
252-475-5495
NOAA Headquarters

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
CHEST 2014
Chest
Blood biomarker may detect lung cancer, study presented at CHEST 2014
A new study shows that patients with stage I to stage III non-small cell lung cancer have different metabolite profiles in their blood than those of patients who are at risk but do not have lung cancer.

Contact: Kristi Bruno
kbruno@chestnet.org
773-750-9962
American College of Chest Physicians

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Frontiers in Zoology
'Shrinking goats' another indicator that climate change affects animal size
Alpine goats appear to be shrinking in size as they react to changes in climate, according to new research from Durham University.
Natural Environment Research Council

Contact: Leighton Kitson
leighton.kitson@durham.ac.uk
44-191-334-6075
Durham University

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
CHEST 2014
Chest
Study shows CPAP use for sleep apnea does not negatively impact sexual quality of life
Patients who use a continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) device to treat obstructive sleep apnea often believe that it makes them less sexually attractive, according to researchers at Rosalind Franklin University.

Contact: Kristi Bruno
kbruno@chestnet.org
773-750-9962
American College of Chest Physicians

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
CHEST 2014
Chest
Large-scale study shows dramatic decline in mortality rates for ARDS
The largest study to date of mortality trends in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome shows that the rate of mortality dropped significantly over a 16-year period. Advances in critical care medicine are seen as a direct cause of the decline.

Contact: Kristi Bruno
kbruno@chestnet.org
773-750-9962
American College of Chest Physicians

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Applied Energy
Getting the salt out
A new study shows effective way to desalinate water from fracked wells.

Contact: Andrew Carleen
acarleen@mit.edu
617-253-1682
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Ecological Informatics
Beyond LOL cats, social networks could become trove of biodiversity data
Vijay Barve demonstrated social networks to be a viable source for photo-vouchered biodiversity records, especially those that clarify which species exist in what places within developing nations.

Contact: Brendan M. Lynch
blynch@ku.edu
785-864-8855
University of Kansas

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Journal of Neuroscience
Immune proteins moonlight to regulate brain-cell connections
When it comes to the brain, 'more is better' seems like an obvious assumption. But in the case of synapses, which are the connections between brain cells, too many or too few can both disrupt brain function. Researchers from Princeton University and the University of California-San Diego recently found an immune-system protein that moonlights in the nervous system to help regulate the number of synapses, and could play an unexpected role in conditions such as Alzheimer's disease, type 2 diabetes and autism.

Contact: Morgan Kelly
mgnkelly@princeton.edu
609-258-5729
Princeton University

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Nature Communications
Detecting cancer earlier is goal of rutgers-developed medical imaging technology
A new medical imaging method being developed at Rutgers University could help physicians detect cancer and other diseases earlier than before, speeding treatment and reducing the need for invasive, time-consuming biopsies. The potentially lifesaving technique uses nanotechnology and shortwave infrared light to reveal small cancerous tumors and cardiovascular lesions deep inside the body.
NIH/National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering

Contact: Carl Blesch
cblesch@ucm.rutgers.edu
848-932-0550
Rutgers University

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Deutsches Ärzteblatt International
Undescended testis: The recommended surgery is being performed too late
In the currently valid medical guideline for the treatment of undescended testis, early surgery is recommended, i.e., orchidopexy before the child's first birthday, in order to prevent late sequelae. Nonetheless, despite this recommendation, most patients in Germany are still being treated far too late, as shown in the study by Georg Hrivatakis and coauthors that appears in the current issue of the Deutsches Ärzteblatt International.

Contact: Dr. Verena Ellerkamp
verena.ellerkamp@med.uni-tuebingen.de
Deutsches Aerzteblatt International

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Science
Extremely high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging
For the first time, researchers have succeeded to detect a single hydrogen atom using magnetic resonance imaging, which signifies a huge increase in the technology's spatial resolution. In the future, single-atom MRI could be used to shed new light on protein structures.

Contact: Christian Degen
degenc@ethz.ch
41-446-332-336
ETH Zurich

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Monthly Notices of Royal Astronomical Society
Big black holes can block new stars
Massive black holes spewing out radio-frequency-emitting particles at near-light speed can block formation of new stars in aging galaxies, a study has found.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Dennis O'Shea
dro@jhu.edu
443-997-9912
Johns Hopkins University

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Journal of Neuroscience
Clot dissolver tPA's tardy twin could aid in stroke recovery
uPA appears to help brain cells recover from the injuries induced by loss of blood flow. Treating mice with uPA after an experimental stroke can improve their recovery of motor function, Emory researchers found.
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Contact: Quinn Eastman
qeastma@emory.edu
404-727-7829
Emory Health Sciences

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Journal of Alzheimer's Disease
New research on walnuts and the fight against Alzheimer's disease
A new animal study published in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease indicates that a diet including walnuts may have a beneficial effect in reducing the risk, delaying the onset, slowing the progression of, or preventing Alzheimer's disease. Research led by Abha Chauhan, Ph.D., head of the Developmental Neuroscience Laboratory at the New York State Institute for Basic Research in Developmental Disabilities, found significant improvement in learning skills, memory, reducing anxiety, and motor development in mice fed a walnut-enriched diet.
New York State Office for People with Developmental Disabilities, California Walnut Commission

Contact: Anna Hazen
CAWalnutsPress@edelman.com
206-664-7849
Edelman Seattle

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
European Physical Journal D
Quantum holograms as atomic scale memory keepsake
A theoretical model of quantum memory for light, adapting the concept of a hologram to a quantum system has been published in EPJD. The authors demonstrate that it is theoretically possible to retrieve, on demand, a given portion of the stored quantized light signal of a holographic image -- set in a given direction in a given position in time sequence. This is done by shaping the control field both in space and time.

Contact: Laura Zimmermann
laura.zimmermann@springer.com
49-622-148-78414
Springer

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Study shows how texas campus police tackle stalking
One out of every five female students experience stalking victimization during their college career, but many of those cases are not reported to police, according to a study by the Crime Victims' Institute at Sam Houston State University.
Crime Victims' Institute

Contact: Beth Kuhles
kuhles@shsu.edu
936-294-4425
Sam Houston State University

Showing releases 251-275 out of 470.

<< < 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 > >>