Choose Help The Kavli Prize

EurekAlert!, a service of AAAS
Home About us
Advanced Search
21-Sep-2014 14:17
US Eastern Time

Username:

Password:

Register

Forgot Password?

Press Releases

Breaking News

Science Business

Grants, Awards, Books

Meetings

Multimedia

Science Agencies
on EurekAlert!

US Department of Energy

US National Institutes of Health

US National Science Foundation

Calendar

Submit a Calendar Item

Subscribe/Sponsor

Links & Resources

Portals

RSS Feeds

Accessibility Option On

Breaking News
US Department of Energy
US National Institutes of Health
US National Science Foundation


Arabic

Breaking News

Titles Only 

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 276-300 out of 462.

<< < 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 > >>

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
Journal of General Internal Medicine
Poor body size judgement can lead to increased tolerance of obesity
Size is relative, especially to people who tend to be on the heavy side. Researchers at the Columbia University Medical Center found that seven in every ten obese adults underestimate how much someone weighs. People of normal weight make this mistake much less often. Mothers of overweight or obese children also tend to misjudge their children's size, as youngsters misjudge their obese mothers' size reports a study in the Journal of General Internal Medicine.
Department of Health and Human Services, Arlene and Joseph Taub Foundation, Edwina and Charles Adler Foundation, Columbia University

Contact: Joan Robinson
joan.robinson@springer.com
49-622-148-78130
Springer

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Pairing social networks with social motives to close the science gap
Noshir Contractor is leading a survey of 14,000 health workers in India to discover how to best disseminate public health information.

Contact: Megan Fellman
fellman@northwestern.edu
847-491-3115
Northwestern University

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
Cell Stem Cell
Scientists create therapy-grade stem cells using new cocktail to reprogram adult cells
Researchers at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem have developed a new cocktail that coaxes adult cells to become pluripotent stem cells of a high enough quality to be used in therapeutic applications. Their research showed that using a different combination of reprogramming factors can produce a much higher quality result, delivering fewer colonies of iPSCs of which 80 percent passed the toughest pluripotency test.
Israeli Centers of Research Excellence Program, Kirschstein National Research Service Award, National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, Chapman Foundation, Florence Brill Graduate Student Fellowship

Contact: Dov Smith
dovs@savion.huji.ac.il
972-258-82844
The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
ASTRO's 56th Annual Meeting
NSCLC patients who never smoked or who quit smoking have lower risk of developing secondary cancers
Non-small cell lung cancer survivors who never smoked or who are former smokers at the time of diagnosis have a lower risk of developing secondary primary lung cancers compared to those who are current smokers, suggesting that increased tobacco exposure is associated with a higher risk of SPLC, according to research presented today at the American Society for Radiation Oncology's 56th Annual Meeting.

Contact: Michelle Kirkwood
press@astro.org
703-286-1600
American Society for Radiation Oncology

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
ASTRO's 56th Annual Meeting
Select group of stage IV lung cancer patients achieve long-term survival after aggressive treatments
A large, international analysis of patients with stage IV non-small cell lung cancer indicates that a patient's overall survival rate can be related to factors including the timing of when metastases develop and lymph node involvement, and that aggressive treatment for 'low-risk' patients leads to a five-year OS rate of 47.8 percent, according to research presented today at the American Society for Radiation Oncology's 56th Annual Meeting.

Contact: Michelle Kirkwood
press@astro.org
703-286-1600
American Society for Radiation Oncology

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
Journal of the National Cancer Institute
Lactation linked to reduced estrogen receptor-negative, triple-negative breast cancer risk
Women who have had children (parous women) appear to have an increased risk of developing estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer, the subtype that carries a higher mortality rate and is more common in women of African ancestry. A similar relationship was found for triple-negative breast cancer. However, the association between childbearing and increased risk of estrogen receptor-negative and triple-negative breast cancer was largely confined to the women who had never breastfed.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Jenny Eriksen Leary
jenny.eriksen@bmc.org
617-638-6841
Boston University Medical Center

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
NASA's Global Hawk and satellites investigating Hurricane Edouard today
The unmanned Global Hawk aircraft that's part of NASA's airborne Hurricane and Severe Storm Sentinel, or HS3 mission was winging its way to Hurricane Edouard on Sept. 16. In addition to the Global Hawk, various NASA satellites are continually providing data on the Atlantic hurricane.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
Translational Psychiatry
Neuroimaging technique identifies concussion-related brain disease in living brain
Detection while patient is still alive improves accuracy of diagnosis and enables estimation of prevalence and risk.

Contact: Elizabeth Dowling
newsmedia@mssm.edu
212-241-9200
The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
Journal of Consumer Research
Can consumers use an easy trick to extend wonderful experiences and shorten bad ones?
Many experiences rarely seem to last the right amount of time. Vacations feel too short, meetings seem too long, and bad dates never seem to end. A new study in the Journal of Consumer Research finds that simply categorizing experiences can help consumers extend good experiences and shorten the bad ones.

Contact: Mary-Ann Twist
JCR@bus.wisc.edu
608-255-5582
University of Chicago Press Journals

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
Journal of Consumer Research
Lucky loyalty? Devoted consumers believe they have earned the right to win random rewards
Loyal consumers can earn benefits such as frequent flyer miles or free nights at hotels when they participate in rewards programs. Loyalty, of course, doesn't increase the odds of winning random prizes or receiving random discounts. According to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research, consumers who have shown loyalty to a company giving a random reward mistakenly believe they are more likely to receive the reward because they deserve it.

Contact: Mary-Ann Twist
JCR@bus.wisc.edu
608-255-5582
University of Chicago Press Journals

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
Journal of Consumer Research
Why are consumers willing to spend more money on ethical products?
What motivates consumers to make ethical choices such as buying clothing not made in a sweat shop, spending more money on fair-trade coffee, and bringing their own bags when they go shopping? According to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research, ethical consumption is motivated by a need for consumers to turn their emotions about unethical practices into action.

Contact: Mary-Ann Twist
JCR@bus.wisc.edu
608-255-5582
University of Chicago Press Journals

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
Journal of Consumer Research
Do you always get what you pay for? How consumers mispredict product quality
Consumers are willing to spend thousands of dollars for luxury brand watches such as Rolex and Cartier because they are synonymous with high quality. But does this mean that inexpensive watches made by low-cost rivals must always be low quality? According to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research, consumers mistakenly predict product quality based on quality consistency in other price ranges.

Contact: Mary-Ann Twist
JCR@bus.wisc.edu
608-255-5582
University of Chicago Press Journals

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
Journal of Consumer Research
Do ads showing sexy women make male consumers less charitable?
What happens when you use images of sexy women to attract men's attention? According to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research, male consumers who are shown images of sexy women feel less connected to other people and are less likely to purchase products advertised as benefiting others or make charitable contributions.

Contact: Mary-Ann Twist
JCR@bus.wisc.edu
608-255-5582
University of Chicago Press Journals

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
Journal of Consumer Research
Exxon Valdez 2014: Does media coverage of manmade disasters contribute to consumer complacency?
Twenty-five years ago, the Exxon Valdez spilled 11 million gallons of oil into Alaska's Prince William Sound. Americans found themselves cleaning up another giant oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico in 2010. According to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research, news coverage of environmental disasters serves to calm our immediate anxieties instead of catalyzing changes in the way fossil fuels are used.

Contact: Mary-Ann Twist
JCR@bus.wisc.edu
608-255-5582
University of Chicago Press Journals

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
International Journal of Applied Geospatial Research
Sam Houston State study examines use of GIS in policing
Police agencies are using Geographic Information Systems for mapping crime, identifying crime 'hot spots,' assigning officers, and profiling offenders, but little research has been done about the effectiveness of the technology in curbing crime, according to a study at Sam Houston State University.

Contact: Beth Kuhles
kuhles@shsu.edu
936-294-4425
Sam Houston State University

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
ASTRO's 56th Annual Meeting
New radiosurgery technology provides highly accurate treatment, greater patient comfort
A new stereotactic radiosurgery system provides the same or a higher level of accuracy in targeting cancer tumors -- but offers greater comfort to patients and the ability to treat multiple tumors at once -- when compared to other radiation therapy stereotactic systems, according to researchers at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit. The study will be presented today, Sept. 16, at ASTRO in San Francisco.
Varian and Henry Ford Hospital

Contact: Krista Hopson Boyer
khopson1@hfhs.org
313-874-7207
Henry Ford Health System

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
Nature Medicine
A new therapeutic target may prevent blindness in premature babies at risk of retinopathy
Possibility of developing new, more selective drugs to control the abnormal growth of blood vessels and prevent blindness including retinopathy of prematurity, a disorder that may result in retinal detachment due to abnormal blood vessel growth in the retina of the eye.
Canadian Institutes of Health Research, March of Dimes, Burroughs Wellcome Fund, Foundation Fighting Blindness, Fonds de recherche du Québec -- Santé

Contact: William Raillant-Clark
w.raillant-clark@umontreal.ca
514-566-3813
University of Montreal

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
Applied Physiology, Nutrition and Metabolism
More cheese, please! New study shows dairy is good for your metabolic health
Researchers from CHU de Québec Research Center and Laval University studied the dairy-eating habits of healthy French-Canadians' and monitored how dairy consumption may have an effect on their overall metabolic health. They published their findings today in the journal Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism.
Canadian Institutes of Health Research

Contact: Jenny Ryan
jenny.ryan@nrcresearchpress.com
Canadian Science Publishing (NRC Research Press)

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
Journal of Cell Biology
Unraveling cell division
CRG researchers shed new light on mitosis. The study published in the Journal of Cell Biology describes how Topo 2, an enzyme that disentangles DNA molecules and is essential for proper cell division.
European Comission, European Research Council

Contact: Laia Cendros
Laia.cendros@crg.eu
34-933-160-294-346-07611
Center for Genomic Regulation

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
Cell Host & Microbe
Good networkers make prime targets
Proteins form either small or large networks to perform their functions. How these protein networks are subverted by pathogens, has been investigated on a plant model by a research team headed by Technische Universität München. Distinct pathogens like fungi and bacteria were found to use the same tactic, launching targeted attacks on highly networked proteins that have multiple functions. The researchers' findings are published in the current issue of Cell Host & Microbe.

Contact: Barbara Wankerl
barbara.wankerl@tum.de
49-892-892-2562
Technische Universitaet Muenchen

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
Biological Psychiatry
Smoking and schizophrenia linked by alterations in brain nicotine signals
Schizophrenia is associated with increased rates and intensity of tobacco smoking. A growing body of research suggests that the relationship between schizophrenia and smoking stems, in part, from an effort by patients to use nicotine to self-medicate symptoms and cognitive impairment associated with the disease.

Contact: Rhiannon Bugno
Biol.Psych@utsouthwestern.edu
214-648-0880
Elsevier

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
Dissertations and Features
Getting the jump on competitors: QUT study
Umpires and judges are the unwitting focus of some of Australia's best fast bowlers, track and field athletes and gymnasts to improve their performance in competition, thanks to a new training technique discovered by a Queensland University of Technology researcher.

Contact: Sandra Hutchinson
s3.hutchinson@qut.edu.au
61-731-389-449
Queensland University of Technology

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
ASTRO's 56th Annual Meeting
Prostate cancer patients surveyed 5 years after vessel-sparing RT report preserved sexual function
A comparison of five-year sexual function outcomes, as reported by patients treated with external beam radiotherapy versus combination external beam radiotherapy plus brachytherapy, indicates that the utilization of vessel-sparing radiation therapy makes cure possible without compromising long-term sexual function, according to research presented today at the American Society for Radiation Oncology's 56th Annual Meeting.

Contact: Michelle Kirkwood
press@astro.org
703-286-1600
American Society for Radiation Oncology

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
ASTRO's 56th Annual Meeting
Prostate cancer patients who receive hypofractionated RT report consistent QoL
Prostate cancer patients who received hypofractionated radiation therapy reported that their quality of life, as well as bladder and bowel function were at similar levels before and after radiation therapy, according to research presented today at the American Society for Radiation Oncology's 56th Annual Meeting.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Michelle Kirkwood
press@astro.org
703-286-1600
American Society for Radiation Oncology

Public Release: 16-Sep-2014
Keystone XL would likely raise oil sands production and greenhouse gas emissions
The proposed Keystone XL pipeline would likely raise oil sands production and greenhouse gas emissions, according to a survey of experts and researchers -- including both supporters and opponents of the pipeline. The survey was conducted by the non-profit Near Zero.
Near Zero

Contact: Karen Fries
press@nearzero.org
Near Zero

Showing releases 276-300 out of 462.

<< < 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 > >>