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Showing releases 1-25 out of 400.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

Public Release: 31-Oct-2014
New England Journal of Medicine
Synthetic lethality offers a new approach to kill tumor cells, explains Moffitt researcher
The scientific community has made significant strides in recent years in identifying important genetic contributors to malignancy and developing therapeutic agents that target altered genes and proteins. A recent approach to treat cancer called synthetic lethality takes advantage of genetic alterations in cancer cells that make them more susceptible to certain drugs. Alan F. List, MD, president and CEO of Moffitt Cancer Center, co-authored an article on synthetic lethality featured in the Oct. 30 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Contact: Kim Polacek
kim.polacek@moffitt.org
813-745-7408
H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute

Public Release: 31-Oct-2014
Journal of Sexual Medicine
Sexual fantasies: Are you normal?
Hoping for sex with two women is common but fantasizing about golden showers is not. That's just one of the findings from a research project that scientifically defines sexual deviation for the first time ever.

Contact: William Raillant-Clark
w.raillant-clark@umontreal.ca
514-566-3813
University of Montreal

Public Release: 31-Oct-2014
Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment
ESA Frontiers November preview
Connectivity cost calculations for conservation corridors, crop companions, jellyfish and human well-being and micromanaging microbes.

Contact: Liza Lester
llester@esa.org
202-833-8773 x211
Ecological Society of America

Public Release: 31-Oct-2014
Report examines health care challenges for pregnant women enrolled in covered California
A new report by Milken Institute School of Public Health at the George Washington University examines the challenge of maintaining enriched health care for pregnant women who are enrolled in Covered California and who are also eligible for Medi-Cal, which includes the Comprehensive Perinatal Services Program.

Contact: Kathy Fackelmann
kfackelmann@gwu.edu
202-994-8354
George Washington University Milken Institute School of Public Health

Public Release: 31-Oct-2014
Journal of Psychoactive Drugs
NYU research: Majority of high school seniors favor more liberal marijuana policies
The study analyzed adolescents' positions toward marijuana decriminalization and legalization. In the analysis, Palamar identifies how positions toward various marijuana policies differ by gender, race, political affiliation and religion. He also examined how lifetime and recent marijuana use relate to such positions.

Contact: Christopher James
christopher.james@nyu.edu
347-421-0832
New York University

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
Journal of Lipid Research
Researchers probe link between newborn health and vitamin A
The impact vitamin A has on newborns is virtually unknown, but Penn State nutrition researchers have published two papers that may provide a framework for future investigations of the vitamin and neonatal health.
NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Contact: Victoria M. Indivero
vmi1@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
Journal of Neuroscience
Link seen between seizures and migraines in the brain
Seizures and migraines have always been considered separate physiological events in the brain, but now a team of engineers and neuroscientists looking at the brain from a physics viewpoint discovered a link between these and related phenomena.
National Insitutes of Health, National Science Foundation

Contact: A'ndrea Elyse Messer
aem1@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
Cell Metabolism
Unlocking the secrets of pulmonary hypertension
A UAlberta team has discovered that a protein that plays a critical role in metabolism, the process by which the cell generates energy from foods, is important for the development of pulmonary hypertension, a deadly disease.
Canadian Institutes of Health Research, University Hospital Foundation, Mazankowski Alberta Heart Institute

Contact: Ross Neitz
rneitz@ualberta.ca
780-492-5986
University of Alberta Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
Astrophysical Journal
Hubble sees 'ghost light' from dead galaxies
NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has picked up the faint, ghostly glow of stars ejected from ancient galaxies that were gravitationally ripped apart several billion years ago. The mayhem happened 4 billion light-years away, inside an immense collection of nearly 500 galaxies nicknamed 'Pandora's Cluster,' also known as Abell 2744
NASA

Contact: Ray Villard
villard@stsci.org
410-338-4514
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
2014 Antarctic ozone hole holds steady
The Antarctic ozone hole reached its annual peak size on Sept. 11, according to scientists from NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The size of this year's hole was 24.1 million square kilometers (9.3 million square miles) -- an area roughly the size of North America.
NASA, NOAA

Contact: Audrey Haar
audrey.j.haar@nasa.gov
240-684-0808
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
Himalaya
Himalayan Viagra fuels caterpillar fungus gold rush
Overwhelmed by speculators trying to cash-in on a prized medicinal fungus known as Himalayan Viagra, two isolated Tibetan communities have managed to do at the local level what world leaders often fail to do on a global scale -- implement a successful system for the sustainable harvest of a precious natural resource, suggests new research from Washington University in St. Louis.

Contact: Gerry Everding
gerry_everding@wustl.edu
314-935-6375
Washington University in St. Louis

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology
New optimal screening threshold for gestational diabetes in twin pregnancies
Gestational diabetes affects approximately 6-7 percent of pregnant women. Currently, screening is done in two steps to help identify patients most at risk; however, the suggested levels for additional testing were based on singleton pregnancy data. Now investigators have analyzed data from twin pregnancies and have determined that the optimal first step cutoff for additional screening appears to be a blood sugar level equal to or greater than 135 mg/dL for women carrying twins.

Contact: Eileen Leahy
ajogmedia@elsevier.com
732-238-3628
Elsevier Health Sciences

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
Nature
They know the drill: UW leads the league in boring through ice sheets
Hollow coring drills designed and managed by UW-Madison's Ice Drilling Design and Operations program are used to extract ice cores that can analyze the past atmosphere. Shaun Marcott, an assistant professor of geoscience at UW-Madison, was the first author of a paper published today in the journal Nature documenting carbon dioxide in the atmosphere between 23,000 and 9,000 years ago, based on data from an 11,000-foot hole in Antarctica.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Kristina Slawny
kristina.slawny@ssec.wisc.edu
608-263-6178
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
Science
Lord of the microrings
Berkeley Lab researchers report a significant breakthrough in laser technology with the development of a unique microring laser cavity that can produce single-mode lasing on demand. This advance holds ramifications for a wide range of optoelectronic applications including metrology and interferometry, data storage and communications, and high-resolution spectroscopy.
Office of Naval Research

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Heart's own immune cells can help it heal
The heart holds its own pool of immune cells capable of helping it heal after injury, according to new research in mice at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.
National Institutes of Health, Oliver Langenberg Physician-Scientist Training Program, Washington University Center for the Investigation of Membrane Excitability Diseases Live Cell Imaging Facility

Contact: Julia Evangelou Strait
straitj@wustl.edu
314-286-0141
Washington University School of Medicine

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
Physical Review Letters
Biology meets geometry
Architecture imitates life, at least when it comes to those spiral ramps in multistory parking garages. Stacked and connecting parallel levels, the ramps are replications of helical structures found in a ubiquitous membrane structure in the cells of the body.

Contact: Julie Cohen
805-893-7220
University of California - Santa Barbara

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
MedLink Neurology
For stroke patients, hospital bed position is delicate balancing act
During the first 24 hours after a stroke, attention to detail --such as hospital bed positioning -- is critical to patient outcomes.

Contact: Jim Ritter
jritter@lumc.edu
708-216-2445
Loyola University Health System

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
Object-Oriented Programming, Systems, Languages and Applications
Harnessing error-prone chips
A new system would allow programmers to easily trade computational accuracy for energy savings.

Contact: Abby Abazorius
abbya@mit.edu
617-253-2709
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
Twenty-first Eastern Pacific tropical depression born on Oct. 30
NOAA's GOES-West satellite captured an image of the birth of the Eastern Pacific Ocean's twenty-first tropical depression, located far south of Acapulco, Mexico.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
Pediatrics
What do American babies eat? A lot depends on Mom's socioeconomic background
Pediatrics researchers at the University at Buffalo have found that dietary patterns of babies vary according to the racial, ethnic and educational backgrounds of their mothers.
University at Buffalo

Contact: Ellen Goldbaum
goldbaum@buffalo.edu
716-645-4605
University at Buffalo

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
2014 Chicago Multidisciplinary Symposium in Thoracic Oncology
Sustained local control for medically inoperable, early stage lung cancer patients
Analysis of data from an institutional patient registry on stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) indicates excellent long-term, local control, 79 percent of tumors, for medically inoperable, early stage lung cancer patients treated with SBRT from 2003 to 2012, according to research presented today at the 2014 Chicago Multidisciplinary Symposium in Thoracic Oncology.

Contact: Michelle Kirkwood
press@astro.org
703-286-1600
American Society for Radiation Oncology

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Making lab-grown tissues stronger
Lab-grown tissues could one day provide new treatments for injuries and damage to the joints, including articular cartilage, tendons and ligaments.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Andy Fell
ahfell@ucdavis.edu
530-752-4533
University of California - Davis

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
2014 Chicago Multidisciplinary Symposium in Thoracic Oncology
Post-operative radiation therapy improves overall survival for patients with resected NSCLC
Patients who received post-operative radiation therapy, radiation therapy after surgery, lived an average of four months longer when compared to the patients who had the same disease site, tumor histology and treatment criteria and who did not receive post-operative radiation therapy, according to research presented today at the 2014 Chicago Multidisciplinary Symposium in Thoracic Oncology.

Contact: Michelle Kirkwood
press@astro.org
703-286-1600
American Society for Radiation Oncology

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
2014 Chicago Multidisciplinary Symposium in Thoracic Oncology
Medicare costs analysis indicates need to decrease use of biopsies as diagnosis tool for lung cancer
Biopsies were found to be the most costly tool prescribed in lung cancer diagnosis, according to research presented today at the 2014 Chicago Multidisciplinary Symposium in Thoracic Oncology.

Contact: Michelle Kirkwood
press@astro.org
703-286-1600
American Society for Radiation Oncology

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
PLOS ONE
University of Tennessee study finds saving lonely species is important for the environment
Joe Bailey looked at endemic eucalyptus found in Tasmania. They discovered that these rare species have developed unique characteristics to survive, and that these characteristics may also impact the survival of its neighbors in the ecosystem.

Contact: Whitney Heins
wheins@utk.edu
865-974-5460
University of Tennessee at Knoxville

Showing releases 1-25 out of 400.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>