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Showing releases 301-325 out of 423.

<< < 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 > >>

Public Release: 15-Dec-2014
Gynecologic Oncology
UTMB study finds that Hispanic women less likely to survive endometrial uterine cancer
In the largest study to date evaluating outcomes of Hispanic women with endometrial uterine cancer, researchers at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston have found that Hispanic women in the United States were significantly less likely to survive the cancer than non-Hispanic white women. The study is available online in the December issue of Gynecologic Oncology.

Contact: Molly Dannenmaier
mjdannen@utmb.edu
409-772-8790
University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston

Public Release: 15-Dec-2014
Science of the Total Environment
Urban stream contamination increasing rapidly due to road salt
Average chloride concentrations often exceed toxic levels in many northern United States streams due to the use of salt to deice winter pavement, and the frequency of these occurrences nearly doubled in two decades.

Contact: Marisa Lubeck
mlubeck@usgs.gov
303-526-6694
United States Geological Survey

Public Release: 15-Dec-2014
Pediatrics
E-cigarettes may recruit lower risk teens to nicotine use
A new study finds that one-third of Hawaiian adolescents have tried e-cigarettes, half of whom have never used another tobacco product. This is markedly higher rate than in the continental US. This raises the possibility that e-cigarettes are recruiting lower risk adolescents, who otherwise would be less susceptible to tobacco product use.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Kirk Cassels
kirk.A.Cassels@Hitchcock.org
603-653-6177
The Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth

Public Release: 15-Dec-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Back to future with Roman architectural concrete
A key discovery to understanding Roman architectural concrete that has stood the test of time and the elements for nearly two thousand years has been made by researchers using beams of X-rays at Berkeley Lab's Advanced Light Source.

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 15-Dec-2014
Journal of American Chemical Society
Dartmouth researchers create 'green' process to reduce molecular switching waste
Dartmouth researchers have found a solution using visible light to reduce waste produced in chemically activated molecular switches, opening the way for industrial applications of nanotechnology ranging from anti-cancer drug delivery to LCD displays and molecular motors.

Contact: John Cramer
John.Cramer@Dartmouth.edu
603-646-9130
Dartmouth College

Public Release: 15-Dec-2014
Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture
Chapman University research on farmers' markets shows presence of Salmonella and E. coli
Researchers in Chapman University's Food Science Program and their collaborators at University of Washington have just published a study on the presence of Salmonella and E. coli on certain herbs sold at farmers' markets. Of the 133 samples tested from 13 farmers' markets, 24.1 percent tested positive for E. coli and one sample tested positive for Salmonella.
Schmid College of Science and Technology and Chapman University

Contact: Sheri Ledbetter
sledbett@chapman.edu
714-289-3143
Chapman University

Public Release: 15-Dec-2014
2014 AGU Fall Meeting
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Hidden movements of Greenland Ice Sheet, runoff revealed
For years NASA has tracked changes in the massive Greenland Ice Sheet. This week scientists using NASA data released the most detailed picture ever of how the ice sheet moves toward the sea and new insights into the hidden plumbing of melt water flowing under the snowy surface.

Contact: George Hale
George.r.hale@nasa.gov
979-829-0962
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 15-Dec-2014
Journal of Proteome Research
Non-gluten proteins identified as targets of immune response to wheat in celiac disease
Researchers at Columbia University Medical Center have found that, in addition to gluten, the immune systems of patients with celiac disease react to specific types of non-gluten protein in wheat. The results were reported online in the Journal of Proteome Research.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Lucky Tran
lt2549@cumc.columbia.edu
212-305-3689
Columbia University Medical Center

Public Release: 15-Dec-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Switching to vehicles powered by electricity from renewables could save lives
Driving vehicles that use electricity from renewable energy instead of gasoline could reduce the resulting deaths due to air pollution by 70 percent. This finding comes from a new life cycle analysis of conventional and alternative vehicles and their air pollution-related public health impacts, published Monday, Dec. 15, 2014, in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
University of Minnesota/Initiative for Renewable Energy and the Environment, DOE/Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, USDA/Agricultural and Food Research Initiative

Contact: Press Office
unews@umn.edu
612-626-7959
University of Minnesota

Public Release: 15-Dec-2014
Journal of Clinical Oncology
Herceptin found to improve long-term survival of HER2-positive breast cancer patients
VCU Massey Cancer Center physician-researcher Charles E. Geyer, Jr., M.D., was the National Protocol Officer for one component of a large national study involving two National Cancer Institute-supported clinical trials that demonstrated that trastuzumab significantly improves the long-term survival of HER-2 positive breast cancer patients.
National Institutes of Health, National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project, Breast Cancer Research Foundation, Genentech

Contact: John Wallace
wallacej@vcu.edu
804-628-1550
Virginia Commonwealth University

Public Release: 15-Dec-2014
Research in Nursing and Health
Rekindling marriage after combat deployment
A new study offers strategies for rekindling marriage after a spouse returns home from combat with post-traumatic stress symptoms present in one or both of the spouses.

Contact: Dawn Peters
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
781-388-8408
Wiley

Public Release: 15-Dec-2014
Journal of Archaeological Science
Dental plaque reveals key plant in prehistoric Easter Island diet
A University of Otago, New Zealand, Ph.D. student analyzing dental calculus from ancient teeth is helping resolve the question of what plant foods Easter Islanders relied on before European contact.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Monica Tromp
monica.tromp@anatomy.otago.ac.nz
University of Otago

Public Release: 15-Dec-2014
2014 AGU Fall Meeting
Major milestones for Carnegie-hosted Deep Carbon Observatory
Recent advances in our understanding of the quantities, movements, forms and origin of carbon in Earth are summarized in a just-published report. The research represents face-paced progress on the depths of the biosphere, Earth, what erupts from volcanoes and leaks from sea floors, what descends back into Earth's great depths, and the nature of carbon-bearing materials within planets.
The Alfred P. Sloan Foundation and others

Contact: Russell Hemley
rhemley@carnegiescience.edu
Carnegie Institution

Public Release: 15-Dec-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Long noncoding RNAs: A novel prognostic marker in older patients with acute leukemia
A new study shows that patterns of molecules called long noncoding RNAs might help doctors choose the least toxic, most effective treatment for many older patients with acute myeloid leukemia. AML occurs mainly in older patients and has a three-year survival rate of 5 to 15 percent.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Coleman Leukemia Research Foundation, Pelotonia Fellowship Program, Associazione Italiana Ricerca sul Cancro AIRC, Ministero della Istruzione Università e Ricerca

Contact: Darrell E. Ward
darrell.ward@osumc.edu
614-293-3737
Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center

Public Release: 15-Dec-2014
Journal of Obstetric, Gynecologic, & Neonatal Nursing
How to treat Ebola during pregnancy
A pregnant woman in Africa who has contracted Ebola is likely to suffer with a spontaneous abortion, pregnancy-related hemorrhage, or the death of her newborn. Although the risk of caring for a pregnant woman with Ebola in the United States may be rare, the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses has published a practice brief in its Journal of Obstetric, Gynecologic, & Neonatal Nursing to guide nursing care for pregnant women and newborns.

Contact: Dawn Peters
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
781-388-8408
Wiley

Public Release: 15-Dec-2014
International Journal of Stress Management
CCNY psychologist links burnout and depression
Research by City College of New York psychology Professor Irvin Schonfeld in the Colin Powell School for Civic and Global Leadership suggests a strong connection between burnout and depression.

Contact: Jay Mwamba
jmwamba@ccny.cuny.edu
212-650-7580
City College of New York

Public Release: 15-Dec-2014
Journal of Bone and Mineral Research
Review highlights ways to prevent and manage jaw bone disease
A review of more than a decade's worth of research on osteonecrosis of the jaw -- when the bone in the jaw is exposed and begins to starve from a lack of blood -- points to an increased risk for patients taking certain drugs for osteoporosis, anticancer drugs or glucocorticoids, those undergoing dental surgery, and people with poor oral hygiene, chronic inflammation, diabetes, or ill-fitting dentures.

Contact: Dawn Peters
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
781-388-8408
Wiley

Public Release: 15-Dec-2014
American Journal of Emergency Medicine
Affordable Care Act increases reliance on emergency rooms, WSU study finds
The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act may have provided health care insurance to an estimated 20 million Americans who lacked coverage, but it has not eased the demand on the nation's emergency departments. In fact, since the law's passage, reliance upon the nation's emergency rooms for non-emergency care has increased.

Contact: Julie O'Connor
julie.oconnor@wayne.edu
313-577-8845
Wayne State University - Office of the Vice President for Research

Public Release: 15-Dec-2014
American Journal of Human Biology
Even expectant dads experience prenatal hormone changes
Researchers recently completed one of the most extensive investigations to date of prenatal hormones in first-time expectant couples. Women showed large prenatal increases in salivary testosterone, cortisol, estradiol, and progesterone, while men showed significant prenatal declines in testosterone and estradiol, but no detectable changes in cortisol or progesterone.

Contact: Dawn Peters
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
781-388-8408
Wiley

Public Release: 15-Dec-2014
Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica
Mobility disabilities can contribute to complications during pregnancy
A new study indicates that women with mobility disabilities often experience problems during pregnancy related to their functional impairments.

Contact: Dawn Peters
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
781-388-8408
Wiley

Public Release: 15-Dec-2014
Clinical Anatomy
Female sexual arousal: Facilitating pleasure and reproduction
Despite numerous studies, publications, and commentaries on human female sexual arousal and orgasm, there is still so much to study and understand about women's sexual pleasure.

Contact: Dawn Peters
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
781-388-8408
Wiley

Public Release: 15-Dec-2014
New Phytologist
How trap-flowers attract and deceive pollinating food thieves
Researchers have discovered a new pollination system that involves food-thieving flies as pollinators. These flies feed on insect secretions, available when a spider, a praying mantis, or other predatory arthropods feed on insects. The plant mimics compounds released from freshly killed insects to deceive flies that are in search of food.

Contact: Dawn Peters
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
781-388-8408
Wiley

Public Release: 15-Dec-2014
Ibis
Do crows have an impact on the population of their prey?
They steal, raid nests, and keep the company of witches, but the unpopular crow may not be as big a menace as people think. A new Ibis study has found that crows -- along with their avian cousins the magpie and the raven -- have surprisingly little impact on the abundance of other bird species.

Contact: Dawn Peters
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
781-388-8408
Wiley

Public Release: 15-Dec-2014
Journal of Biogeography
How blood parasites colonize and persist in small island bird populations
A new study highlights the complex factors at play for parasites that infect animal populations residing on small islands. The findings are important for understanding colonization and extinction as drivers of island biogeography.

Contact: Dawn Peters
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
781-388-8408
Wiley

Public Release: 15-Dec-2014
Geoarchaeology
Evidence of Viking/Norse metalworking in Arctic Canada
A small stone container found by archaeologists a half-century ago has now been recognized as further evidence of a Viking or Medieval Norse presence in Arctic Canada during the centuries around 1000 A.D.

Contact: Dawn Peters
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
781-388-8408
Wiley

Showing releases 301-325 out of 423.

<< < 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 > >>