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Showing releases 301-325 out of 430.

<< < 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 > >>

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
X-ray irradiation at a certain dose alters the neuronal cytoskeleton and cytomechanics
Cranial radiotherapy is one of the most important therapeutic methods for the treatment of various types of primary and metastatic brain tumors. Although conventional photon irradiation has significantly improved the treatment of cancer, the central nervous system is prone to damage after high-dose irradiation, resulting in severe delayed or progressive nervous tissue injury. The issues regarding brain radiation injury have been widely discussed, and recent investigations have emphasized changes in pathomorphology. However, the underlying mechanism remains in debate.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Acupuncture at the Taixi activates cerebral neurons in old patients with MCI
Previous findings have demonstrated that acupuncture at the Taixi acupoint in healthy youths can activate neurons in cognitive-related cerebral cortex. In a perspective article released in the Neural Regeneration Research, Dr. Shangjie Chen and co-workers at Baoan Hospital, Southern Medical University, China investigated whether acupuncture at this acupoint in elderly patients with mild cognitive impairment can also activate neurons in these regions.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
HIF 1α viral vector inhibits hippocampal neuronal apoptosis: The future of gene therapy
Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 attenuates amyloid-beta protein neurotoxicity and decreases apoptosis induced by oxidative stress or hypoxia in cortical neurons. Professor Xiqing Chai and co-workers from Hebei Chemical and Pharmaceutical College, China constructed a recombinant adeno-associated virus vector expressing the human HIF-1α gene efficiently, and tested the assumption that rAAV-HIF-1α represses hippocampal neuronal apoptosis induced by amyloid-beta protein.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Ginkgo biloba enhances neurogenesis and improves recovery following a stroke in mice
Stroke is a fourth leading cause of death and a major cause of long-term disability, which inflicts substantial economic and societal burdens. Drug therapies aimed at post-stroke recovery that can enhance endogenous neurogenesis may help minimize the cost related to prolonged hospital stays and rehabilitation. Ginkgo biloba, a widely studied herbal product for the treatment of neurological disorders, offers endogenous neurogenesis-enhancing properties that hold the promise of providing recovery-improving benefits to stroke patients.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Strategies to preserve myelin during secondary degeneration following neurotrauma
Following injury to the central nervous system, functional loss is exacerbated by spreading damage causing secondary degeneration of surrounding tissue. Using a model of secondary degeneration where the optic nerve is partially transected, has allowed demonstration of oxidative stress and myelin abnormalities in nerve vulnerable to spreading damage. Therapeutic strategies designed to reduce oxidative stress and dysmyelination, including combination of calcium channel inhibitors, prevent the functional loss of secondary degeneration in this model.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
Pediatrics
Low-income students in charter high schools less likely to engage in risky behavior
Low-income minority adolescents who were admitted to high-performing public charter high schools in Los Angeles were significantly less likely to engage in risky health behaviors than their peers who were not admitted to those schools. These students also scored significantly better on California state standardized math and English tests.
NIH/National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities

Contact: Enrique Rivero
erivero@mednet.ucla.edu
310-794-2273
University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
Translational Oncology
Unique study focuses on combined treatment approach for locally advanced pancreatic cancer
Investigators at the Cedars-Sinai Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute are developing a novel, multistep investigational treatment for one of the most complex and difficult-to-treat forms of the disease, locally advanced pancreatic cancer.
PHASE ONE, Diane V. Allen

Contact: Cara Martinez
cara.martinez@cshs.org
310-423-7798
Cedars-Sinai Medical Center

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
Management Science
'Moral victories' might spare you from losing again
Research finds that coaches tend to overreact to close losses, and their hasty personnel adjustments tend to backfire in the long run.

Contact: Joe Hadfield
joe_hadfield@byu.edu
801-422-9206
Brigham Young University

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
Nature
International team sheds new light on biology underlying schizophrenia
As part of a multinational, collaborative effort, researchers from Canada's Centre for Addiction and Mental Health have helped identify over 100 locations in the human genome associated with the risk of developing schizophrenia. The findings, published online in Nature, point to biological mechanisms and pathways that may underlie schizophrenia, and could lead to new approaches to treating the disorder, which has seen little innovation in drug development in more than 60 years.

Contact: Kate Richards
kate.richards@camh.ca
416-535-8501 x36015
Centre for Addiction and Mental Health

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
Nature Genetics
LSU's Mark Batzer contributes to Nature Genetics article on marmoset genome
LSU's Mark Batzer, Boyd Professor and Dr. Mary Lou Applewhite Distinguished Professor in Department of Biological Sciences in the College of Science, contributed to an article in the scientific journal Nature Genetics, titled 'The Common Marmoset Genome Provides Insight into Primate Biology and Evolution,' published on July 20.

Contact: Billy Gomila
bgomila@lsu.edu
225-578-3867
Louisiana State University

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
JAMA Internal Medicine
Temple study compares deep vein thrombosis therapies
Patients who have a clot in their legs and are considering whether to be treated with traditional blood-thinning medication or undergo a minimally-invasive catheter-based clot removal procedure should feel comfortable that there is no difference in death rates between the two treatments, although there are more bleeding risks with the catheter procedure, according to a study by Temple University School of Medicine researchers.
Temple's Cardiovascular Division

Contact: Kathleen Duffy
Kathleen.Duffy@tuhs.temple.edu
267-800-4359
Temple University Health System

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
National survey from AP-NORC examines perceptions of health-care provider quality
The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research has released the results of a major survey examining the public's opinions about what it means to be a quality health-care provider in the United States. The survey, funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, sheds new light on how American adults perceive the quality of their health care and doctors, as well as the information they use and trust when making health-care decisions.
Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

Contact: Eric Young
young-eric@norc.org
703-217-6814
NORC at the University of Chicago

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
Nature
NIH-supported scientists demonstrate very early formation of SIV reservoir
Scientists have generally believed that HIV and its monkey equivalent, SIV, gain a permanent foothold in the body very early after infection, making it difficult to completely eliminate the virus even after antiretroviral therapy has controlled it. Now NIH-supported researchers report that SIV can become entrenched in tissues fewer than three days after infection, before the virus is detectable in blood plasma or blood cells.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Laura S. Leifman
laura.sivitz@nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
Boreas
Mammoth and mastodon behavior was less roam, more stay at home
UC research on mammoths and mastodons could benefit modern-day elephants.

Contact: Tom Robinette
tom.robinette@uc.edu
513-556-1825
University of Cincinnati

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
Geophysical Research Letters
Global warming 'pause' since 1998 reflects natural fluctuation
Statistical analysis of average global temperatures between 1998 and 2013 shows that the slowdown in global warming during this period is consistent with natural variations in temperature, according to research by McGill University physics professor Shaun Lovejoy.

Contact: Chris Chipello
christopher.chipello@mcgill.ca
514-398-4201
McGill University

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
Environmental Research Letters
Water, water -- not everywhere: Mapping water trends for African maize
Researchers at Princeton University analyzed trends in the water cycle in 21 African countries between 1979 and 2010 and found that the majority of maize-growing areas experienced increased water availability, although the trends varied by region. The greater availability of water generally resulted from a mixture of increased rainfall and decreased evaporation and transpiration.
US Army Corps of Engineers Institute for Water Resources, NASA Measures Program

Contact: Catherine Zandonella
czandone@princeton.edu
609-258-0541
Princeton University

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
International Bioprinting Congress
Louisiana Tech University professor presents at International Bioprinting Congress
Dr. Mark DeCoster, the James E. Wyche III Endowed Professor in Biomedical Engineering at Louisiana Tech University, will present 'Bioprinting interfaces for 2-D and 3-D cell and tissue models' focusing on the development of a novel, matrix-free method for generating 3-D cell spheroids that are combining knowledge from bioprinting methods on 2-D surfaces to link 3-D cellular structures.

Contact: Dave Guerin
dguerin@latech.edu
318-257-4854
Louisiana Tech University

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
Nano Letters
Penn study: Understanding graphene's electrical properties on an atomic level
For the first time, researchers from the University of Pennsylvania have used a cutting-edge microscope to study the relationship between the atomic geometry of a ribbon of graphene and its electrical properties.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, Department of Energy, Fonds de la Recherche Scientifique, South Korea's Ministry of Education, Science and Technology and National Research Foundation

Contact: Evan Lerner
elerner@upenn.edu
215-573-6604
University of Pennsylvania

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
Environment: Science and Policy for Sustainable Development
Researchers provide guide to household water conservation
A paper co-written by an Indiana University researcher and published in the current issue of the journal Environment describes how households can reduce water use substantially by simple actions such as installing more efficient appliances and changing day-to-day habits involving water consumption.

Contact: Steve Hinnefeld
slhinnef@iu.edu
812-856-3488
Indiana University

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
Fires and smoke in Canada's Northern Territories
Environment Canada has issued a high health risk warning for Yellowknife and surrounding area because of heavy smoke in the region due to forest fires. Currently 160 wildfires are burning across the region.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
NASA satellite sees Typhoon Matmo brush eastern Philippines
A NASA satellite captured an image of the western quadrant of Typhoon Matmo brushing over the eastern Philippines on July 20.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics
Parents rank their obese children as 'very healthy'
A University of California, San Diego School of Medicine-led study suggests that parents of obese children often do not recognize the potentially serious health consequences of childhood weight gain or the importance of daily physical activity in helping their child reach a healthy weight.
Hasbro Children's Hospital Research Award, NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Contact: Scott LaFee
slafee@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
Open Access Journal of Contraception
Communication about female condom vital to young adults, UT Arlington researchers say
UT Arlington communication researchers examine sexual health messages aimed at young college adults about the female condom.

Contact: Bridget Lewis
blewis@uta.edu
817-272-3317
University of Texas at Arlington

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
Astrophysical Journal
Transiting exoplanet with longest known year
Astronomers have discovered a transiting exoplanet with the longest known year. Kepler-421b circles its star once every 704 days. In comparison, Mars orbits our sun once every 780 days. Most of the 1,800-plus exoplanets discovered to date are much closer to their stars and have much shorter orbital periods.

Contact: Christine Pulliam
cpulliam@cfa.harvard.edu
617-495-7463
Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
Molecular Psychiatry
UCI researchers find epigenetic tie to neuropsychiatric disorders
Dysfunction in dopamine signaling profoundly changes the activity level of about 2,000 genes in the brain's prefrontal cortex and may be an underlying cause of certain complex neuropsychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia, according to UC Irvine scientists.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Tom Vasich
tmvasich@uci.edu
949-824-6455
University of California - Irvine

Showing releases 301-325 out of 430.

<< < 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 > >>