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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 301-325 out of 359.

<< < 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 > >>

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
ZooKeys
A tiny new species of frog from Brazil with a heroic name
Molecular analysis helps scientists discover and describe a tiny new species of narrow-mouthed frog from the genus Chiasmocleis. The news species, Chiasmocleis quilombola is named after the quilombos -- communities constituted by and used as refuges for slaves who had the brevity to escape in colonial Brazil. The study was published in the open-access journal ZooKeys.

Contact: João F. R. Tonini
jfrtonini@gmail.com
Pensoft Publishers

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Journal of Traumatic Stress
Teens pay high psychiatric toll when raised in conditions of political conflict
A new study by Professor Michelle Slone of Tel Aviv University finds that Israeli youths exposed to protracted conflict suffer far higher levels of anxiety, phobia, fear, depression, obsessive-compulsive symptoms, and paranoia than their counterparts in the US. The largest cross-sectional empirical study of its kind, the research assessed youths exposed to terrorism, missile attacks, war, forced residential relocations, and military operations.

Contact: George Hunka
ghunka@aftau.org
212-742-9070
American Friends of Tel Aviv University

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Oncotarget
Metastatic brain tumor treatment could be on the horizon with use of SapC-DOPS
A Cincinnati Cancer Center study, published in the advance online edition of the journal Oncotarget, provides hope that previously studied SapC-DOPS could be used for treatment of brain cancer that has spread.
UC Brain Tumor Molecular Therapeutics Program, UC College of Medicine, National Institutes of Health, New Drug State Key Project

Contact: Katie Pence
katie.pence@uc.edu
513-558-4561
University of Cincinnati Academic Health Center

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Cell Reports
Identified a key molecule in flies that adjusts energy use under starvation conditions
In the study, published today in Cell Reports, the IRB Barcelona scientists show that in the fly Drosophila melanogaster, p53 is activated in certain cells to adapt the metabolic response to nutrient deprivation, thus having a global effect on the organism.

Contact: Sonia Armengou
armengou@irbbarcelona.org
34-934-037-255
Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona)

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Journal of Behavioral and Developmental Pediatrics
Background TV can be bad for kids
Leaving the television on can be detrimental to children's learning and development, according to a new study from the University of Iowa. Researchers found that background television can divert a child's attention from play and learning. Results appear in the Journal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics.
Department of Education, Corporation for Public Broadcasting, Public Broadcasting System for the Ready to Learn Initiative

Contact: Richard Lewis
richard-c-lewis@uiowa.edu
319-384-0012
University of Iowa

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Chest
CDC reports annual financial cost of COPD to be $36 billion in the United States
American College of Chest Physicians announced today the online first publication of 'Total and state-specific medical and absenteeism costs of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease among adults aged ≥18 years in the United States for 2010 and projections through 2020.'

Contact: Kristi Bruno
kbruno@chestnet.org
773-750-9962
American College of Chest Physicians

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Cell Reports
A world first: Researchers identify a treatment that prevents tumor metastasis
Metastasis, the strategy adopted by tumor cells to transform into an aggressive form of cancer, are often associated with a gloomy prognosis. Managing to block the metastasis or to prevent their formation would be a giant step towards the fight against cancer. Researchers at Université catholique de Louvain in Belgium successfully performed this world first on models of human tumors in mice. The results of their study were published in the prestigious journal Cell Reports.
European Research Council Starting Grant, Fond de la Recherche Scientifique, Fondation Contre le Cancer

Contact: Prof. Pierre Sonveaux
pierre.sonveaux@uclouvain.be
32-495-251-739
Université catholique de Louvain

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Nature Communications
University of Delaware researcher describes new approach for creating organic zeolites
In a landmark paper published in the international scientific journal Nature Communications, University of Delaware researcher Yushan Yan describes a new approach to creating organic zeolites.

Contact: Donna O'Brien
dobrien@udel.edu
University of Delaware

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
European Physical Journal B
Unleashing the power of quantum dot triplets
Quantum computers have yet to materialize. Yet, scientists are making progress in devising suitable means of making such computers faster. One such approach relies on quantum dots -- a kind of artificial atom, easily controlled by applying an electric field. A new study published in European Physical Journal B demonstrates that changing the coupling of three coherently coupled quantum dots with electrical impulses can help better control them.

Contact: Laura Zimmermann
laura.zimmermann@springer.com
49-622-148-78414
Springer

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Addiction
Warning: Birthdays can be bad for your health
New research has found that birthday-related drinking is associated with upsurges in hospital admissions among young people. This study of drinking behavior in Ontario, Canada, was published online in the scientific journal Addiction.

Contact: Nicole Weingartner
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
201-748-5808
Wiley

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Immunity
Experiments prove 'stemness' of individual immune memory cells
Researchers in Germany and the US have proven for the first time that specific individual immune cells, termed 'central memory T cells,' have all the essential characteristics of adult tissue stem cells. Such cells can perpetuate themselves indefinitely and generate diverse offspring that can reconstitute 'tissue' function. These findings indicate that it should be possible to fully restore specific immunity to pathogens in immunocompromised patients by substitution of small numbers of these T cells.
German Research Foundation, Helmholtz Alliance on Immunotherapy of Cancer, German Federal Ministry of Education and Research, National Science Foundation

Contact: Vera Siegler
vera.siegler@tum.de
49-892-892-2731
Technische Universitaet Muenchen

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Chemist develops X-ray vision for quality assurance
A Technical University of Denmark researcher has developed a method that uses X-rays for the rapid identification of substances present in an indeterminate powder. The new technique has the capacity to recognize advanced biological molecules such as proteins. The method therefore has enormous potential in both food production and the pharmaceutical industry, where it opens up new opportunities for the quality assurance of protein-based medicines, for example.

Contact: Christian Grundahl Frankaer
cghar@kemi.dtu.dk
45-45-25-24-69
Technical University of Denmark

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
New methods of detecting Salmonella in pork meat processing
Infections caused by food-borne microorganisms are an increasing public health burden. In a Ph.D. project at the National Food Institute at the Technical University of Denmark, new methods of characterizing and detecting foodborne illness-causing Salmonella in pork meat processing and in bacteria in water, feed and food samples were studied.

Contact: Jeffrey Hoorfar
jhoo@food.dtu.dk
45-35-88-73-79
Technical University of Denmark

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Journal of Biological Chemistry
Four-billion-year-old chemistry in cells today
Parts of the primordial soup in which life arose have been maintained in our cells today according to scientists at the University of East Anglia. Research published today in the Journal of Biological Chemistry reveals how cells in plants, yeast and very likely also in animals still perform ancient reactions thought to have been responsible for the origin of life -- some four billion years ago.
Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council

Contact: Lisa Horton
l.horton@uea.ac.uk
44-016-035-92764
University of East Anglia

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Journal of Experimental Social Psychology
New research: When it hurts to think we were made for each other
Psychologists observe that people talk and think about love in limitless ways but underlying such diversity are some common themes that frame how we think about relationships. For example, one popular frame considers love as perfect unity; in another frame, love is a journey. These two ways of thinking about relationships are particularly interesting because, according to a new study, they have the power to highlight or downplay the damaging effect of conflicts on relationship evaluation.
Drs. Richard Charles and Esther Yewpick Lee Charitable Foundation

Contact: Ken McGuffin
mcguffin@rotman.utoronto.ca
416-946-3818
University of Toronto, Rotman School of Management

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
BMJ Open
Seeing the same GP at every visit will reduce emergency department attendance
Attendances at emergency departments can be reduced by enabling patients to see the same GP every time they visit their doctor's surgery. This is just one of several recommendations made in a report published today, led by researchers at the University of Bristol.
National Institute for Health Research School for Primary Care Research

Contact: Philippa Walker
philippa.walker@bristol.ac.uk
44-117-928-8086
University of Bristol

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
PLOS ONE
Noise pollution impacts fish species differently
Acoustic disturbance has different effects on different species of fish, according to a new study from the universities of Bristol and Exeter which tested fish anti-predator behavior.

Contact: Philippa Walker
press-office@bristol.ac.uk
44-117-928-7777
University of Bristol

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
PLOS ONE
Western Indian Ocean communities play vital role in conservation
An international team of researchers led by the University of York has carried out the first assessment of community-led marine conservation in the Western Indian Ocean. The results, reported in the journal PLOS ONE, point to a revolution in the management of marine protected areas, with almost half of the sites -- more than 11,000 square km -- in the region now under local community stewardship.
Natural Environment Research Council, Economic and Social Research Council, John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation

Contact: David Garner
david.garner@york.ac.uk
44-019-043-22153
University of York

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
International Journal of Low Radiation
Natural products from plants protect skin during cancer radiotherapy
Plant-derived natural product chemicals could offer protection to the skin from the harmful effects of gamma radiation during cancer radiotherapy, suggests research published in the International Journal of Low Radiation.

Contact: Albert Ang
press@inderscience.com
Inderscience Publishers

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
ACM Conference on Security and Privacy in Wireless and Mobile Networks
Wireless home automation systems reveal more than you would think about user behavior
Home automation systems that control domestic lighting, heating, window blinds or door locks offer opportunities for third parties to intrude on the privacy of the inhabitants and gain considerable insight into their behavioral patterns. This is the conclusion reached by IT security expert Christoph Sorge and his research team at Saarland University. Even data transmitted from encrypted systems can provide information useful to potential burglars.

Contact: Christoph Sorge
christoph.sorge@uni-saarland.de
49-068-130-25122
Saarland University

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Nature Communications
One route to malaria drug resistance found
Researchers have uncovered a way the malaria parasite becomes resistant to an investigational drug. The discovery, at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, also is relevant for other infectious diseases including bacterial infections and tuberculosis.
Children's Discovery Institute of Washington University and St. Louis Children's Hospital, NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, March of Dimes

Contact: Julia Evangelou Strait
straitj@wustl.edu
314-286-0141
Washington University School of Medicine

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Astrophysical Journal Letters
Astronomers come up dry in search for water on exoplanets
A team of astronomers has made the most precise measurements yet of water vapor in the atmospheres of Jupiter-like planets beyond our solar system and found between ten and a thousand times less water vapor than what models predict.
NASA, Space Telescope Science Institute

Contact: Chris Sasaki
csasaki@dunlap.utoronto.ca
416-978-6613
Dunlap Institute for Astronomy & Astrophysics

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Rhode Island Medical Journal
Miriam Hospital physician advocates awareness, collaboration to combat peaking hep C virus
Lynn E. Taylor, M.D., director of The Miriam Hospital's HIV/Viral Hepatitis Coinfection program, states in a commentary in the July, 2014 Rhode Island Medical Journal special edition, 'RI Defeats Hep C' that eliminating hepatitis C virus infection is feasible, can provide economic benefits, enhance capacity to address other health challenges, and improve health care disparities.

Contact: Elena Falcone-Relvas
efalconerelvas@lifespan.org
401-793-7484
Lifespan

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Science
Synchronization of North Atlantic, North Pacific preceded abrupt warming, end of ice age
Scientists have long been concerned that global warming may push Earth's climate system across a 'tipping point,' where rapid melting of ice and further warming may become irreversible -- a hotly debated scenario with an unclear picture of what this point of no return may look like. A new study suggests that combined warming of the North Atlantic and Pacific Oceans thousands of years ago may have provided the tipping point for abrupt warming and rapid melting of the northern ice sheets.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Summer Praetorius
spraetorius@coas.oregonstate.edu
541-737-6159
Oregon State University

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Lancet Infectious Diseases
Less than 1 percent of UK public research funding spent on antibiotic research in past 5 years
Less than 1 percent of research funding awarded by public and charitable bodies to UK researchers in 2008 was awarded for research on antibiotics, according to new research published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases.
Medical Research Council, Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council, Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council, Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, National Institute for Health Research, Wellcome Trust

Contact: Laura Piddock
l.j.v.piddock@bham.ac.uk
44-012-141-45134
The Lancet

Showing releases 301-325 out of 359.

<< < 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 > >>