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Showing releases 301-325 out of 470.

<< < 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 > >>

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
The Physics Teacher
Backpack physics: Smaller hikers carry heavier loads
Hikers are generally advised that the weight of the packs they carry should correspond to their own size, with smaller individuals carrying lighter loads. Although petite backpackers might appreciate the excuse to hand off heavier gear to the larger members of the group, it turns out that they may not need the help.

Contact: Jason Socrates Bardi
jbardi@aip.org
240-535-4954
American Institute of Physics

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
British Medical Journal
Teenage self-harm linked to problems in later life
Those who self-harm as teenagers are more at risk of developing mental health and substance misuse problems as adults, new research from the biggest study of its kind in the UK has revealed.
Medical Research Council

Contact: Philippa Walker
philippa.walker@bristol.ac.uk
44-117-928-8086
University of Bristol

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Nature Communications
Ancient Europeans intolerant to lactose for 5,000 years after they adopted agriculture
By analyzing DNA from petrous bones of ancient Europeans, scientists have identified these peoples remained intolerant to lactose (natural sugar in the milk of mammals) for 5,000 years after they adopted agricultural practices. The scientific team examined nuclear ancient DNA extracted from thirteen individuals from burials from archaeological sites in the Great Hungarian Plain. The skeletons sampled date from 5,700 BC (Early Neolithic) to 800 BC (Iron Age).

Contact: Dominic Martella
dominic.martella@ucd.ie
353-872-959-118
University College Dublin

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Diabetologia
Studies must be carried out to determine whether exercise slows the onset of type 1 diabetes in children and adults
Rates of type 1 diabetes -- the autoimmune form of the condition that often begins in childhood and eventually results in lifelong dependency on insulin -- are increasing in almost all nations worldwide. However, while it appears possible from research in other forms of diabetes that physical exercise could slow the progression of this disease, there have been no studies to date that explore this in patients with type 1 diabetes.

Contact: Parth Narendran
p.narendran@bham.ac.uk
44-796-206-0352
Diabetologia

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Journal of Applied Physics
Exploring X-Ray phase tomography with synchrotron radiation
X-ray phase tomography is an imaging technique that uses penetrating X-rays to create volumetric views through 'slices' of soft biological tissues, and it offers strongly enhanced contrast compared to conventional CT scans, yet scientists do not know which X-ray phase tomography methods are best suited to yield optimized results for a variety of conditions. To answer this question, a large group of researchers in Europe set out to compare three different X-ray phase tomography methods.

Contact: Jason Socrates Bardi
jbardi@aip.org
240-535-4954
American Institute of Physics

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
PLOS Medicine
Large variation in cesarean rates across US hospitals
Katy Kozhimannil and colleagues S.V. Subramanian and Mariana Arcaya used the 2009 and 2010 US Nationwide Inpatient Sample from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project, a 20 percent sample of US hospitals, to study hospital variation in cesarean section rates.
NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

Contact: Maya Sandler
medicinepress@plos.org
PLOS

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
PLOS Medicine
Most published medical research is false; Here's how to improve
In 2005, in a landmark paper viewed well over a million times, John Ioannidis explained in PLOS Medicine why most published research findings are false. To coincide with PLOS Medicine's 10th anniversary he responds to the challenge of this situation by suggesting how the research enterprise could be improved.
Laura and John Arnold Foundation

Contact: Maya Sandler
medicinepress@plos.org
PLOS

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Molecular Psychiatry
UCSF researchers identify key factor in transition from moderate to problem drinking
A team of UC San Francisco researchers has found that a tiny segment of genetic material known as a microRNA plays a central role in the transition from moderate drinking to binge drinking and other alcohol use disorders.
NIH/National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, State of California

Contact: Pete Farley
peter.farley@ucsf.edu
415-502-6397
University of California - San Francisco

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
11 million will lose health insurance if ACA subsidies are eliminated, study finds
Several lawsuits have challenged the legality of the subsidies that help low- and moderate-income people buy private healtah insurance through marketplaces set up under the federal Affordable Care Act. A new study finds that eliminating those subsidies would sharply boost costs for consumers and cause more than 11 million Americans to lose their health insurance.
US Department of Health and Human Services

Contact: Warren Robak
robak@rand.org
310-451-6913
RAND Corporation

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
JAMA
Study finds high percentage of recalled dietary supplements still have banned ingredients
About two-thirds of FDA recalled dietary supplements analyzed still contained banned drugs at least six months after being recalled, according to a study in the Oct. 22/29 issue of JAMA.

Contact: David Cecere
dcecere@challiance.org
617-591-4044
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
JAMA
Study examines differences between types of physician practice ownership and expenditures
From the perspective of the insurers and patients, between 2009 and 2012, hospital-owned physician organizations in California incurred higher expenditures for commercial health maintenance organization enrollees for professional, hospital, laboratory, pharmaceutical and ancillary services than did physician-owned organizations, according to a study in the Oct. 22/29 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Sarah Yang
scyang@berkeley.edu
510-643-7741
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
JAMA
More competition among physicians related to lower prices paid by private PPOs
An examination of the relationship between physician competition and prices paid by private preferred provider organizations (PPOs) for common office visits finds that more competition is associated with lower prices paid to physicians in 10 large specialties, according to a study in the Oct. 22/29 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Becky Bach
retrout@stanford.edu
530-415-0507
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
JAMA
Study examines effect of hospital switch to for-profit status
Hospital conversion from nonprofit to for-profit status in the 2000s was associated with better subsequent financial health but had no relationship to the quality of care delivered, mortality rates, or the proportion of poor or minority patients receiving care, according to a study in the Oct. 22/29 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Todd Datz
tdatz@hsph.harvard.edu
617-432-8413
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
JAMA
Making health services prices available linked to lower total claims payments
Searching a health service pricing website before using the service was associated with lower payments for clinical services such as advanced imaging and laboratory tests, according to a study in the Oct. 22/29 issue of JAMA.

Contact: Robert Perkins
perkinsr@usc.edu
213-740-9226
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
JAMA
Competition keeps health-care costs low, Stanford researchers find
Medical practices in less competitive health-care markets charge more for services, according to a study conducted by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine and the National Bureau of Economic Research.

Contact: Michelle Brandt
mbrandt@stanford.edu
650-723-0272
Stanford University Medical Center

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
JAMA
Hospitals converting to for-profit status show better financial health, no loss in quality
Switching from nonprofit to for-profit status appears to boost hospitals' financial health but does not appear to lower the quality of care they provide or reduce the proportion of poor or minority patients receiving care.
NIH/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Todd Datz
tdatz@hsph.harvard.edu
617-432-8413
Harvard School of Public Health

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Journal of Chemical Physics
Triplet threat from the sun
The most obvious effects of too much sun exposure are cosmetic, like wrinkled and rough skin. Some damage, however, goes deeper -- ultraviolet light can damage DNA and cause proteins in the body to break down into smaller, sometimes harmful pieces that may also damage DNA, increasing the risk of skin cancer and cataracts. Understanding the specific pathways by which this degradation occurs is an important step in developing protective mechanisms against it.

Contact: Jason Socrates Bardi
jbardi@aip.org
240-535-4954
American Institute of Physics

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
PLOS Biology
Disease outbreak management -- flexibility can save lives and money
What is the best way to handle a disease outbreak? Current efforts to prevent or stem such outbreaks may fall short because of uncertainty and limited information about the real-time dynamics of the specific disease outbreak. A team of epidemiologists, led by two Penn State University researchers, proposes a new approach for responding to and managing disease outbreaks -- a flexible approach that could save many lives and millions of dollars.

Contact: Press Office
biologypress@plos.org
PLOS

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
mBio
Once CD8 T cells take on one virus, they'll fight others too
CD8 T cells are known for becoming attuned to fight a specific pathogen ('adaptive immunity'), but a new study shows that in that process they also become first-responders that can fend off a variety of other invaders ('innate immunity'). The findings suggest that innate immunity changes with the body's experience and that the T cells are more versatile than thought.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: David Orenstein
david_orenstein@brown.edu
401-863-1862
Brown University

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
PLOS Biology
Flexibility in disease outbreak management could save lives and money
Research by a team of epidemiologists from the United Kingdom and the United States has proposed a new approach for responding to and managing disease outbreaks. They say lives and money could be saved if decisions are adapted to relevant information about the dynamics of the current crisis and not based on retrospective analyses of prior crises, trials and interventions.
Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council, National Institutes of Health, US Department of Homeland Security, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation

Contact: Lindsay Brooke
lindsay.brooke@nottingham.ac.uk
44-011-595-15751
University of Nottingham

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
PLOS Biology
In disease outbreak management, flexibility can save lives and money
A new, more flexible, approach for responding to and managing disease outbreaks has been developed that could save many lives and millions of dollars. The approach, called 'adaptive management,' allows decision-makers to use knowledge gained during an outbreak to update ongoing interventions with the goal of containing outbreaks more quickly, efficiently, and effectively.

Contact: Barbara K. Kennedy
science@psu.edu
814-863-4682
Penn State

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research
Smoking interferes with neurocognitive recovery during abstinence from alcohol
Researchers know that alcohol-dependent individuals sustain neurocognitive impairment even after detoxification. A new study examines specific domains of cognitive recovery in conjunction with smoking status. Findings show that smoking status influenced the rate and level of neurocognitive recovery during eight months of abstinence in the ALC group.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Timothy C. Durazzo
timothy.durazzo@ucsf.edu
415-221-4810 x4157
Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research
Bar attendance supports heavy drinking by young adults in the US-Mexico border region
Mexico is a nearby destination where younger US residents can legally drink heavily. However, high levels of drinking on the US side are not always linked to recent travel to Mexico. New findings show that higher levels of drinking among US-Mexico border youth are closely linked to their patterns of bar attendance, but not to how they think about drinking.
NIH/National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism

Contact: Britain A. Mills
britain.mills@utsouthwestern.edu
817-677-8557
Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research
Understanding drinking behaviors among women with unwanted pregnancies
Most women reduce or stop drinking alcohol upon discovery of pregnancy. A new study looks at changes in alcohol use, and factors contributing to these changes, among women with unwanted pregnancies. Findings indicate that most women with unwanted pregnancies quit or reduce alcohol consumption once they discover their pregnancies, and that some may be substituting alcohol for drugs once they discover their pregnancies.
Wallace Alexander Gerbode Foundation, William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, David and Lucile Packard Foundation, NIH/National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism

Contact: Laura Kurtzman
laura.kurtzman@ucsf.edu
415-476-3163
Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research
Bogus recycling bins help identify drinking patterns among low-income seniors
Substance abuse is the fastest growing health concern for older adults. New findings show that drinking levels are high enough to be concerning and tend to spike around the times older adults receive their social security checks. These results may have prevention implications for social workers working with low-income seniors.
San Diego State University Center for Alcohol and Drug Studies

Contact: John D. Clapp
clapp.5@osu.edu
614-688-1068
Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research

Showing releases 301-325 out of 470.

<< < 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 > >>