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Showing releases 301-325 out of 464.

<< < 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 > >>

Public Release: 19-Aug-2014
BJU International
Study finds increased rates of preventable deaths in the US following common urologic procedures
In recent years, a shift from inpatient to outpatient surgery in the US for commonly performed urologic procedures has coincided with increasing deaths following complications that were potentially recognizable or preventable. The finding, which comes from a recent study published in BJU International, indicates the importance of monitoring urologic surgery patients for potential complications.

Contact: Evelyn Martinez
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
201-748-6358
Wiley

Public Release: 19-Aug-2014
PLOS Medicine
Blood glucose levels measured in hospitalized patients can predict risk of type 2 diabetes
Blood glucose levels measured in hospitalized adults during acute illness can be used to predict risk of developing type 2 diabetes over the following three years, according to a study published by David McAllister and colleagues from the University of Edinburgh, UK, in this week's PLOS Medicine.
Chief Scientist Office for Scotland

Contact: Maya Sandler
medicinepress@plos.org
PLOS

Public Release: 19-Aug-2014
PLOS Medicine
Nurse staffing and mortality in stroke centers
Hospital staffing levels have been associated with patient outcomes, but staffing on weekends has not been well studied. To helpaddress the paucity of research, Dr. Benjamin Bray of King's College London and Royal College of Physicians, UK, and colleagues conducted a prospective cohort study of weekend staffing with stroke specialist physicians for patients admitted to 103 stroke units in England, published in this issue of PLOS Medicine.
National Institute for Health Research Biomedical Research Centre at Guy's and St. Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, King's College London

Contact: Maya Sandler
medicinepress@plos.org
PLOS

Public Release: 19-Aug-2014
2014 American Sociological Association Annual Meeting
Nurses driven mainly by a desire to help others are more likely to burn out
Nurses who are motivated primarily by the desire to help others, rather than by enjoyment of the work itself or the lifestyle it makes possible, are more likely to burn out on the job, University of Akron researchers say.

Contact: Daniel Fowler
pubinfo@asanet.org
202-527-7885
American Sociological Association

Public Release: 19-Aug-2014
2014 American Sociological Association Annual Meeting
In an already stressful workplace, Great Recession's health effects hard to find
The Great Recession of 2007-2009 had little direct effect on the health of workers who survived the waves of job cuts that took place during that period, according to a new University of Akron study. That's the good news.

Contact: Daniel Fowler
pubinfo@asanet.org
202-527-7885
American Sociological Association

Public Release: 19-Aug-2014
2014 American Sociological Association Annual Meeting
Unlike less educated people, college grads more active on weekends than weekdays
People's educational attainment influences their level of physical activity both during the week and on weekends, according to a study whose authors include two University of Kansas researchers.

Contact: Daniel Fowler
pubinfo@asanet.org
202-527-7885
American Sociological Association

Public Release: 19-Aug-2014
2014 American Sociological Association Annual Meeting
Daughters provide as much elderly parent care as they can, sons do as little as possible
Parents are better off having daughters if they want to be cared for in their old age suggests a new study, which finds that women appear to provide as much elderly parent care as they can, while men contribute as little as possible.

Contact: Daniel Fowler
pubinfo@asanet.org
202-527-7885
American Sociological Association

Public Release: 18-Aug-2014
Nature Nanotechnology
MIPT and RAS scientists made an important step towards creating medical nanorobots
Researchers at Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology and Russian Academy of Sciences made an important step towards creating medical nanorobots discovering a way of enabling them to produce logical calculations using a variety of biochemical reactions.

Contact: Alexandra O. Borissova
borissova@phystech.edu
7-926-376-1175
Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology

Public Release: 18-Aug-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
TAG-1 induces apoptosisrelated gene expression without triggering glioma apoptosis
These findings, which were published in the Neural Regeneration Research, provide novel insight into the mechanisms of glial tumorigenesis.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 18-Aug-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
AMPK and inflammatory mediators are involved in postoperative cognitive dysfunction
Postoperative cognitive dysfunction is associated with neuronal apoptosis, which may result from post-surgery inflammation, the phosphorylation of tau protein and the accumulation of amyloid in aged people.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 18-Aug-2014
Arthritis & Rheumatology
Genetic key to lupus shows potential of personalized medicine
DNA sequencing of a lupus patient has identified a specific genetic mutation that is causing the disease, opening the way for personalized treatments.

Contact: Dr. Julia Ellyard
Julia.Ellyard@anu.edu.au
61-413-843-609
Australian National University

Public Release: 18-Aug-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Electroacupuncture attenuates neuropathic pain after brachial plexus injury
Electroacupuncture has traditionally been used to treat pain, but its effect on pain following brachial plexus injury is still unknown.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 18-Aug-2014
Molecular Carcinogenesis
Leukemia drug shows promise for skin, breast and other cancers
A leukemia drug called dasatinib shows promise for treating skin, breast and several other cancers, according to researchers at Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine.

Contact: Jim Ritter
jritter@lumc.edu
708-216-2445
Loyola University Health System

Public Release: 18-Aug-2014
Astronomical Journal
Solar salad, anyone?
An Arizona State University alumna has devised the largest catalog ever produced for stellar compositions. The work is critical to understanding the properties of stars, how they form, and possible connections with orbiting planets. And what she found from her work is that the compositions of nearby stars aren't as uniform as once thought.

Contact: Nikki Cassis
ncassis@asu.edu
602-710-7169
Arizona State University

Public Release: 18-Aug-2014
Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B
Hand gestures improve learning in both signers and speakers
Spontaneous gesture can help children learn, whether they use a spoken language or sign language, according to a new report.

Contact: Jann Ingmire
jingmire@uchicago.edu
773-702-2772
University of Chicago

Public Release: 18-Aug-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Study at Deepwater Horizon spill site finds key to tracking pollutants
A new study of the ocean circulation patterns at the site of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill reveals the significant role small-scale ocean currents play in the spread of pollutants. The findings provide new information to help predict the movements of oil and other pollutants in the ocean.
The Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative

Contact: Diana Udel
dudel@rsmas.miami.edu
305-421-4704
University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science

Public Release: 18-Aug-2014
Global Biogeochemical Cycles
Study of African dust transport to South America reveals air quality impacts
A new study that analyzed concentrations of African dust transported to South America shows large seasonal peaks in winter and spring. These research findings offer new insight on the overall human health and air quality impacts of African dust, including the climate change-induced human health effects that are expected to occur from increased African dust emissions in the coming decades.

Contact: Diana Udel
dudel@rsmas.miami.edu
305-421-4704
University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science

Public Release: 18-Aug-2014
Nature
NASA's RXTE satellite decodes the rhythm of an unusual black hole
Astronomers have uncovered rhythmic pulsations from a rare type of black hole 12 million light-years away by sifting through archival data from NASA's Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer satellite.
NASA

Contact: Francis Reddy
Francis.j.reddy@nasa.gov
301-286-4453
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 18-Aug-2014
US Association for Energy Economics Annual Conference
Purdue ag economists: Shale oil 'dividend' could pay for smaller carbon footprint
Unanticipated economic benefits from the shale oil and gas boom could help offset the costs of substantially reducing the US's carbon footprint, Purdue agricultural economists say.

Contact: Natalie van Hoose
nvanhoos@purdue.edu
765-496-2050
Purdue University

Public Release: 18-Aug-2014
2014 American Sociological Association Annual Meeting
Men fare worse than women in China regarding discrimination among obese workers
The study, 'The Obesity Pay Gap: Gender, Body Size, and Wage Inequalities: A Longitudinal Study of Chinese Adults, 1991-2009,' shows that obese manual laborers especially earn less money in China. For example, results showed that overweight professional workers made from 18.5 to 41.5 percent more than overweight manual laborers.

Contact: Julie Newberg
Julie.Newberg@asu.edu
48-072-703-116
Arizona State University

Public Release: 18-Aug-2014
American Journal of Physiology - Heart and Circulatory Physiology
Hope for healthy hearts revealed in naked mole rat studies
The naked mole rat, the longest lived of rodents, shows superior cardiovascular function to old age in two studies released in 2014. The research is from The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio and collaborating institutions.
American Heart Association, NIH/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

Contact: Will Sansom
sansom@uthscsa.edu
210-567-2579
University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio

Public Release: 18-Aug-2014
SCAR Open Science Conference
Waterloo makes public most complete Antarctic map for climate research
The University of Waterloo has unveiled a new satellite image of Antarctica, and the imagery will help scientists all over the world gain new insight into the effects of climate change.

Contact: Pamela Smyth
psmyth@uwaterloo.ca
519-888-4777
University of Waterloo

Public Release: 18-Aug-2014
Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health
Neighborhood ethnic composition and problem drinking among older Mexican-American men
Louisiana State University's Samuel Stroope is the lead author of a new study, 'Neighborhood Ethnic Composition and Problem Drinking among Older Mexican American Men,' that will appear in the Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health. Stroope -- and co-authors at Baylor University and the University of Texas Medical Branch -- found that older Mexican-American men are less likely to engage in problem drinking as residents of neighborhoods with a higher proportion of Mexican-Americans.

Contact: Tara Kistler
tkistler@lsu.edu
225-578-3869
Louisiana State University

Public Release: 18-Aug-2014
NOAA analysis reveals significant land cover changes in US coastal regions
A new NOAA nationwide analysis shows that between 1996 and 2011, 64,975 square miles in coastal regions -- an area larger than the state of Wisconsin -- experienced changes in land cover, including a decline in wetlands and forest cover with development a major contributing factor. Overall, 8.2 percent of the nation's ocean and Great Lakes coastal regions experienced these changes.
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Contact: Ben Sherman
ben.sherman@noaa.gov
301-713-3066
NOAA Headquarters

Public Release: 18-Aug-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Researchers inspired by marine life to design camouflage systems
Researchers have developed a technology that allows a material to automatically read its environment and adapt to mimic its surroundings, described in a paper published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Cunjiang Yu, assistant professor of mechanical engineering at the University of Houston and lead author of the paper, said the system was inspired by the skins of cephalopods, a class of marine animals which can change coloration quickly, both for camouflage and as a form of warning.

Contact: Jeannie Kever
jekever@uh.edu
713-743-0778
University of Houston

Showing releases 301-325 out of 464.

<< < 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 > >>