Choose Help The Kavli Prize

EurekAlert!, a service of AAAS
Home About us
Advanced Search
30-Aug-2014 02:37
US Eastern Time

Username:

Password:

Register

Forgot Password?

Press Releases

Breaking News

Science Business

Grants, Awards, Books

Meetings

Multimedia

Science Agencies
on EurekAlert!

US Department of Energy

US National Institutes of Health

US National Science Foundation

Calendar

Submit a Calendar Item

Subscribe/Sponsor

Links & Resources

Portals

RSS Feeds

Accessibility Option On

Breaking News
US Department of Energy
US National Institutes of Health
US National Science Foundation


Arabic

Breaking News

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 326-350 out of 425.

<< < 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 > >>

Public Release: 26-Aug-2014
Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research
Young children's sipping/tasting of alcohol reflects parental modeling
A new study examines antecedent predictors of childhood initiation of sipping or tasting alcohol. Findings indicate that initiation of sipping/tasting was less related to psychosocial proneness for problem behavior and more related to perceived parental approval for child sipping.
National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism

Contact: John E. Donovan, Ph.D.
donovanje@upmc.edu
412-246-6950
Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research

Public Release: 26-Aug-2014
Radiology
Wii Balance Board induces changes in the brains of MS patients
A balance board accessory for a popular video game console can help people with multiple sclerosis (MS) reduce their risk of accidental falls, according to new research. Magnetic resonance imaging scans showed that use of the Nintendo Wii Balance Board system appears to induce favorable changes in brain connections associated with balance and movement.

Contact: Linda Brooks
lbrooks@rsna.org
630-590-7762
Radiological Society of North America

Public Release: 25-Aug-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Neuronal activation by acupuncture at Yongquan and sham acupoints for DOC: A PET study
Hao Zhang and colleagues from China Rehabilitation Research Center found that acupuncture at the Yongquan acupoints induced stronger neuronal activity than acupuncture at the sham acupoints shown on positron emission tomography.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 25-Aug-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Molecular regulation of hypoxic-ischemic brain damage
Dr. Lijun Yang and co-workers from Beijing Friendship Hospital, Capital Medical University in China prepared whole brain slices from a rat model of oxygen-glucose deprivation and explored dynamic expression pattern of Olig1 during hypoxic-ischemic brain damage and after miRNA-9 transfection.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 25-Aug-2014
Neural Regeneration Research
Unusual neural connection between injured cingulum and brainstem in a SAH patients
Dr. Sung Ho Jang and team from College of Medicine, Yeungnam University in Korea report on a patient who showed unusual neural connections between injured cingulums and brainstem cholinergic nuclei following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage, using diffusion tensor tractography.

Contact: Meng Zhao
eic@nrren.org
86-138-049-98773
Neural Regeneration Research

Public Release: 25-Aug-2014
Nature Medicine
Eye implant developed at Stanford could lead to better glaucoma treatments
Lowering internal eye pressure is currently the only way to treat glaucoma. A tiny eye implant developed by Stephen Quake's lab could pair with a smartphone to improve the way doctors measure and lower a patient's eye pressure.

Contact: Bjorn Carey
bccarey@stanford.edu
650-725-1944
Stanford University

Public Release: 25-Aug-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Duality principle is 'safe and sound'
Decades of experiments have verified the quirky laws of quantum theory again and again. So when scientists in Germany announced in 2012 an apparent violation of a fundamental law of quantum mechanics, a physicist at the University of Rochester was determined to find an explanation.
Canada Excellence Research Chairs Program, Fonds de recherche Nature et technologies

Contact: David Barnstone
dbarnsto@ur.rochester.edu
631-835-2012
University of Rochester

Public Release: 25-Aug-2014
Oncotarget
Finding keys to glioblastoma therapeutic resistance
Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have found one of the keys to why certain glioblastomas -- the primary form of a deadly brain cancer -- are resistant to drug therapy. The answer lies not in the DNA sequence of the tumor, but in its epigenetic signature. These findings have been published online as a priority report in the journal Oncotarget.
Sontag Foundation, Burroughs Wellcome Foundation, Kimmel Foundation, Doris Duke Foundation, Forbeck Foundation

Contact: Scott LaFee
slafee@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 25-Aug-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
High insulin levels tied to obesity pathway, new UT Southwestern research shows
UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers have identified a crucial link between high levels of insulin and pathways that lead to obesity, a finding that may have important implications when treating diabetes.

Contact: Russell Rian
russell.rian@utsouthwestern.edu
214-648-3404
UT Southwestern Medical Center

Public Release: 25-Aug-2014
The Plant Cell
Researchers find boron facilitates stem cell growth and development in corn
The eastern half of the United States is plagued by boron deficient soil and corn and soybean farmers are required to supplement their soil with boron; however, little is known about the ways in which corn plants utilize the essential nutrient. Now, researchers at the University of Missouri have found that boron plays an integral role in development and reproduction in corn plants. Understanding how corn uses the nutrient can help farmers improve crop yields.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy

Contact: Jeff Sossamon
sossamonj@missouri.edu
573-882-3346
University of Missouri-Columbia

Public Release: 25-Aug-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
New process helps overcome obstacles to produce renewable fuels and chemicals
There's an old saying in the biofuels industry: 'You can make anything from lignin except money.' But now, a new study may pave the way to challenging that adage. The study from the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory demonstrates a concept that provides opportunities for the successful conversion of lignin into a variety of renewable fuels, chemicals, and materials for a sustainable energy economy.
US Department of Energy

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Public Release: 25-Aug-2014
Annals of Internal Medicine
Personal protective equipment is critical but not enough to shield health care workers from Ebola
Personal protective equipment designed to shield health care workers from contaminated body fluids of Ebola patients is not enough to prevent transmission, according to a commentary being published early online today in Annals of Internal Medicine.

Contact: Megan Hanks
mhanks@acponline.org
215-351-2656
American College of Physicians

Public Release: 25-Aug-2014
ChemBioChem
Cancer-fighting drugs might also stop malaria early
Scientists searching for new drugs for malaria have identified a number of compounds -- some of which are in clinical trials to treat cancer -- that could lead to new ways to fight the disease. Researchers identified 31 enzyme-blocking molecules, called protein kinase inhibitors, that curb malaria before symptoms start. By focusing on treatments that act early, the researchers hope to give drug-resistant strains less time to spread.
Duke University, Harvard Medical School, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Robin Ann Smith
ras10@duke.edu
919-681-8057
Duke University

Public Release: 25-Aug-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
MU researchers discover protein's ability to inhibit HIV release
A family of proteins that promotes virus entry into cells also has the ability to block the release of HIV and other viruses, University of Missouri researchers have found.

Contact: Derek Thompson
thompsonder@health.missouri.edu
573-882-3323
University of Missouri-Columbia

Public Release: 25-Aug-2014
Endocrinology
Exposure to toxins makes great granddaughters more susceptible to stress
According to a new study by researchers from The University of Texas at Austin and Washington State University, male and female rats are affected differently by ancestral exposure to a common fungicide, vinclozolin. Female rats whose great grandparents were exposed to vinclozolin become much more vulnerable to stress, becoming more anxious and preferring the company of novel females to familiar females.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Marc Airhart
mairhart@austin.utexas.edu
512-232-1066
University of Texas at Austin

Public Release: 25-Aug-2014
Molecular and Cellular Biology
New biomarker highly promising for predicting breast cancer outcomes
A protein named p66ShcA shows promise as a biomarker to identify breast cancers with poor prognoses, according to research published ahead of print in the journal Molecular and Cellular Biology.

Contact: Jim Sliwa
jsliwa@asmusa.org
202-942-9297
American Society for Microbiology

Public Release: 25-Aug-2014
American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease and Other Dementias
New coping strategy for the memory impaired and their caregivers
Mindfulness training for individuals with early-stage dementia and their caregivers together in the same class was beneficial for both groups, easing depression and improving sleep and quality of life. Just eight sessions of training made a positive difference, resulting in more joy, less worry.
NIH/National Institute of Aging

Contact: Marla Paul
marla-paul@northwestern.edu
312-503-8928
Northwestern University

Public Release: 25-Aug-2014
Illinois Law Review
To deter cyberattacks, build a public-private partnership
The best way to combat cyberattacks may be a joint public-private partnership between government and business, says a new paper from Jay Kesan, the H. Ross and Helen Workman Research Scholar at the University of Illinois College of Law.

Contact: Phil Ciciora
pciciora@illinois.edu
217-333-2177
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Public Release: 25-Aug-2014
Journal of General Internal Medicine
Doctors miss opportunities to offer flu shots
Doctors should make a point of offering a flu vaccine to their patients. A simple reminder could considerably reduce the number of racial and ethnic minorities who currently do not vaccinate themselves against this common contagious respiratory illness.

Contact: Alexander K. Brown
alexander.brown@springer.com
212-620-8063
Springer Science+Business Media

Public Release: 25-Aug-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Tilted acoustic tweezers separate cells gently
Precise, gentle and efficient cell separation from a device the size of a cell phone may be possible thanks to tilt-angle standing surface acoustic waves, according to a team of engineers.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: A'ndrea Elyse Messer
aem1@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 25-Aug-2014
Fires in Western Australia
According to the Department of Fire and Emergency Services of Western Australia, a bushfire ADVICE remains for people traveling along Great Northern Highway approximately 20 kilometers east of Broome, and Cape Leveque Road approximately 40 kilometers north of Broome, in the Shire of Broome.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 25-Aug-2014
Biochemistry
Sweet! Glycoconjugates are more than the sum of their sugars
Conventional wisdom says that the scaffold in an important class of biological molecules called 'glycoconjugates' is essentially inert. Work by a Michigan Tech chemist suggests otherwise.
Natural Science and Engineering Research Council of Canada, Michigan Technological University

Contact: Marcia Goodrich
mtunews@mtu.edu
906-487-2343
Michigan Technological University

Public Release: 25-Aug-2014
BMC Evolutionary Biology
Zombie ant fungi 'know' brains of their hosts
A parasitic fungus that reproduces by manipulating the behavior of ants emits a cocktail of behavior-controlling chemicals when encountering the brain of its natural target host, but not when infecting other ant species, a new study shows.
Marie Curie Actions

Contact: A'ndrea Elyse Messer
aem1@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 25-Aug-2014
Fires above the Great Slave Lake in Canada
Updates from NWTfire.com report that there are 133 active fires in the North Slave Region of the Northwest Territories. No new fires reported in the past 24 hours. Fire danger is moderate to high. Smoke may be an issue in some communities.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 25-Aug-2014
Developmental Science
Learning by watching, toddlers show intuitive understanding of probability
Most people know children learn many skills simply by watching people around them. Without explicit instructions youngsters know to do things like press a button to operate the television and twist a knob to open a door. Now researchers have taken this further, finding that children as young as age two intuitively use mathematical concepts such as probability to help make sense of the world around them.
James S. McDonnell Foundation, National Science Foundation

Contact: Molly McElroy
mollywmc@uw.edu
206-221-1684
University of Washington

Showing releases 326-350 out of 425.

<< < 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 > >>