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Showing releases 351-375 out of 470.

<< < 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 > >>

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
International Journal of Radiation Oncology Biology Physics
Patients who have left breast tumors have comparable OS to those with right breast tumors
Tumor laterality (left-side vs. right-side) does not impact overall survival in breast cancer patients treated with breast-conserving surgery and adjuvant external beam radiation therapy, according to a study published in the Oct. 1, 2014 issue of the International Journal of Radiation Oncology Biology Physics (Red Journal), the official scientific journal of the American Society for Radiation Oncology.

Contact: Michelle Kirkwood
press@astro.org
703-286-1600
American Society for Radiation Oncology

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Stress-related inflammation may increase risk for depression
Preexisting differences in the sensitivity of a key part of each individual's immune system to stress confer a greater risk of developing stress-related depression or anxiety
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Johnson and Johnson International Mental Health Research Organization, Irma T. Hirschl/Monique Weill-Caulier Trust, Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Brain and Behavior Research Organization

Contact: Elizabeth Dowling
newsmedia@mssm.edu
212-241-9200
The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
PLOS ONE
Supercomputers link proteins to drug side effects
New medications created by pharmaceutical companies have helped millions of Americans alleviate pain and suffering from their medical conditions. However, the drug creation process often misses many side effects that kill at least 100,000 patients a year.

Contact: Ken Ma
ma28@llnl.gov
925-423-7602
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Environmental Science & Technology
New tracers can identify frac fluids in the environment
Scientists have developed new geochemical tracers that can identify hydraulic fracturing flowback fluids that have been spilled or released into the environment.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Cheryl Dybas
cdybas@nsf.gov
703-292-7734
National Science Foundation

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Fires in the Egypt River Delta
A NASA satellite has detected a fire in the Egyptian River Delta.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
NASA's Terra Satellite sees Tropical Storm Ana over Hawaii
Tropical Storm Ana made a slow track west of the Hawaiian islands over the last couple of days, and by Oct. 20 was moving westward away from the main Hawaiian islands and heading toward the northwest Hawaiian islands. NASA's Terra satellite caught Ana on a flyby on Oct. 19 that showed the storm's clouds blanketing the chain of islands.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
The quick life and death of Tropical Storm Trudy
Tropical Storm Trudy formed on Saturday, Oct. 17 and by Oct.19 the storm made landfall in southern Mexico and weakened to a remnant low pressure area.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Gonzalo: First hand account in Bermuda, next stop: The United Kingdom
Hurricane Gonzalo departed from Bermuda leaving power outages, downed trees, and damaged homes and buildings. An on-the ground account of the storm indicated the eye passed over the island. By Oct. 20, post-tropical storm Gonzalo was approaching the United Kindgom, sparking severe weather warnings.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
JAMA Internal Medicine
For prescription drug addiction treatment, buprenorphine maintenance trumps detoxification
For treating patients with prescription opioid dependence in primary care, buprenorphine maintenance therapy is superior to detoxification, according to a new study by Yale School of Medicine researchers published in the Oct. 20 issue of JAMA Internal Medicine.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Karen N. Peart
karen.peart@yale.edu
203-432-1326
Yale University

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Nature Communications
See-through, one-atom-thick, carbon electrodes powerful tool to study brain disorders
A graphene, one-atom-thick microelectrode now solves a major problem for investigators looking at brain circuitry. Pinning down the details of how individual neural circuits operate in epilepsy and other brain disorders requires real-time observation of their locations, firing patterns, and other factors.
National Institutes of Health, Citizens United for Research in Epilepsy, Mirowski Family Foundation

Contact: Karen Kreeger
karen.kreeger@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-5658
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Psychological Science
Positive subliminal messages on aging improve physical functioning in elderly
Older individuals who are subliminally exposed to positive stereotypes about aging showed improved physical functioning that can last for several weeks, a new study led by the Yale School of Public Health has found.
NIH/National Institute on Aging, NIH/National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, Patrick and Catherine Weldon Donaghue Medical Research Foundation

Contact: michael.greenwood@yale.edu
michael.greenwood@yale.edu
203-737-5151
Yale University

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons
Obesity link to increased risk for orthopedic conditions and surgical complications
Obesity affects individual patient care, the healthcare system and nearly every organ in the body. People with obesity often have other health problems, including diabetes, heart disease, certain tumors and cancers, and psychiatric disorders. However, the role of obesity in orthopedic conditions and their treatment is less well-publicized.

Contact: Kayee Ip
ip@aaos.org
847-384-4035
American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Journal of Hazardous Materials
New study charts the fate of chemicals affecting health and the environment
In a new study, Rolf Halden, PhD, a researcher at Arizona State University's Biodesign Institute, examines the trajectory of chemicals appearing as emergent threats to human or environmental health. Halden's meta-analysis of 143,000 peer-reviewed research papers tracks the progress of these chemicals of emerging concern, revealing patters of emergence from obscurity to peak concern and eventual decline, over a span of 30 years.

Contact: RICHARD HARTH
richard.harth@asu.edu
Arizona State University

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
Siblings of children with autism can show signs at 18 months
About 20 percent of younger siblings of children with Autism Spectrum Disorder will develop the condition by age 3. A new study by Yale School of Medicine researchers has found that 57 percent of these younger siblings who later develop the condition already showed symptoms at age 18 months.

Contact: Karen N. Peart
karen.peart@yale.edu
203-432-1326
Yale University

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Journal of Hazardous Materials
Fish tale: New study evaluates antibiotic content in farm-raised fish
In a new study, Hansa Done, Ph.D. candidate, and Rolf Halden, Ph.D., researchers at Arizona State University's Biodesign Institute, examine antibiotic use in the rapidly expanding world of global aquaculture.

Contact: Richard Harth
richard.harth@asu.edu
Arizona State University

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
WSU researchers see how plants optimize their repair
Researchers led by a Washington State University biologist have found the optimal mechanism by which plants heal the botanical equivalent of a bad sunburn. Their work, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, could lead to the development of crops that can repair the sun's damage more easily, improving yields and profitability.
Washington State Agricultural Research Center, National Science Foundation, United States-Israel Binational Agricultural Research and Development Fund, Israel Science Foundation, Human Frontier Science Program Organization

Contact: Helmut Kirchhoff
kirchhh@wsu.edu
509-335-3304
Washington State University

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Lancet
Controlling Ebola in West Africa most effective way to decrease international risk: Paper
Controlling the Ebola virus outbreak at the source in West Africa is the most effective way to decrease international risk of transmission, according to a research paper to be published in The Lancet.

Contact: Leslie Shepherd
shepherdl@smh.ca
416-864-6094
St. Michael's Hospital

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
GSA 2014 Annual Meeting
Heavy metal frost? A new look at a Venusian mystery
enus is hiding something beneath its brilliant shroud of clouds: a first order mystery about the planet that researchers may be a little closer to solving because of a new re-analysis of twenty-year-old spacecraft data.

Contact: Christa Stratton
cstratton@geosociety.org
778-331-7625
Geological Society of America

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Journal of Women's Health
Shopping for an egg donor: Is beauty, brains, or health most important?
When it comes to picking an egg donor, until recent years, recipients tended to prefer someone with a similar appearance. Donor trait choices are changing, though, and which traits are now more preferable and why is the focus of 'Beauty, Brains or Health: Trends in Ovum Recipient Preferences,' an article published in Journal of Women's Health.

Contact: Kathryn Ryan
kryan@liebertpub.com
914-740-2100
Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
GSA 2014 Annual Meeting
Secrets of dinosaur ecology found in fragile amber
Ryan McKellar's research sounds like it was plucked from Jurassic Park: he studies pieces of amber found buried with dinosaur skeletons. But rather than re-creating dinosaurs, McKellar uses the tiny pieces of fossilized tree resin to study the world in which the now-extinct behemoths lived.

Contact: Christa Stratton
778-331-7625
Geological Society of America

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Educational Technology Research & Development
Digital native fallacy: Teachers still know better when it comes to using technology
Members of today's younger Net Generation aren't more tech savvy than their teachers just because they were born into a world full of computers. In fact, if it weren't for the coaxing and support of their educators, many students would never use their electronic devices for more than playing games or listening to music. So reports a new study in the journal Educational Technology Research & Development, published by Springer.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Joan Robinson
joan.robinson@springer.com
49-622-148-78130
Springer

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
New Dynamics of Ageing
Elderly people fear family falls short in ethnic minority communities
Elderly people in Pakistani and Bangladeshi communities in England fear changes in cultural attitudes will leave them without family care or state social services in their old age.

Contact: Keith Coles
keith.coles@brunel.ac.uk
Brunel University

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Restorative Neurology and Neuroscience
User-friendly electronic 'EyeCane' enhances navigational abilities for the blind
Electronic travel aids have the potential to improve navigation for the blind, but early versions had disadvantages that limited widespread adoption. A new ETA, the 'EyeCane,' developed by a team of researchers at The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, expands the world of its users, allowing them to better estimate distance, navigate their environment, and avoid obstacles, according to a new study published in Restorative Neurology and Neuroscience.

Contact: Daphne Watrin
d.watrin@iospress.nl
31-206-883-355
IOS Press

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
International Journal of Nanomedicine
Design of micro and nanoparticles to improve treatments for Alzheimer's and Parkinson's
At the Faculty of Pharmacy of the UPV/EHU-University of the Basque Country encapsulation techniques are being developed to deliver correctly and effectively certain drugs.

Contact: Matxalen Sotillo
komunikazioa@ehu.es
34-688-673-770
University of the Basque Country

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Geophysical Research Letters
Massive debris pile reveals risk of huge tsunamis in Hawaii
A mass of marine debris discovered in a giant sinkhole in the Hawaiian islands provides evidence that at least one mammoth tsunami, larger than any in Hawaii's recorded history, has struck the islands, and that a similar disaster could happen again, new research finds. Scientists are reporting that a wall of water up to nine meters (30 feet) high surged onto Hawaiian shores about 500 years ago. A 9.0-magnitude earthquake off the coast of the Aleutian Islands triggered the mighty wave, which left behind up to nine shipping containers worth of ocean sediment in a sinkhole on the island of Kauai.

Contact: Nanci Bompey
nbompey@agu.org
202-777-7524
American Geophysical Union

Showing releases 351-375 out of 470.

<< < 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 > >>