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Showing releases 351-375 out of 572.

<< < 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 > >>

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
Brain
A medium amount of physical activity can lower the risk of Parkinson's disease
A new study, published online in Brain: A Journal of Neurology today, followed 43,368 individuals in Sweden for an average of 12.6 years to examine the impact of physical activity on Parkinson's disease risk. It was found that 'a medium amount' of physical activity lowers the risk of Parkinson's disease.
Swedish Research Council, Swedish Cancer Society, Karolinska Instituet Distinguished Professor Award

Contact: Kirsty Doole
kirsty.doole@oup.com
07-557-163-098
Oxford University Press

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
PLOS Medicine
Does 'brain training' work?
Computer based 'brain training' can boost memory and thinking skills in older adults, but many programs promoted by the $1 billion brain training industry are ineffective, reveals new research by the University of Sydney.

Contact: Kobi Print
kobi.print@sydney.edu.au
61-481-012-729
University of Sydney

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
Neuroscience 2014
Lumosity presents 99,022-participant study on learning rates at Neuroscience 2014
The study, titled 'Optimizing Cognitive Task Designs to Improve Learning Rates in a Large Online Population,' analyzed game play performance from 99,022 participants, and found that participants operating closer to their performance threshold earlier in their experience with a cognitive task tend to have faster learning rates -- especially at higher levels of difficulty.

Contact: Melissa Malski
mmalski@lumoslabs.com
570-498-9018
Lumosity

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
BMJ
Police face higher risk of sudden cardiac death during stressful duties
Police officers in the United States face roughly 30 to 70 times higher risk of sudden cardiac death when they're involved in stressful situations -- suspect restraints, altercations, or chases -- than when they're involved in routine or non-emergency activities
Harvard-NIOSH Education and Research Center, Monica Odening '06 Internship & Research Fund in Mathematics

Contact: Marge Dwyer
mhdwyer@hsph.harvard.edu
617-432-8416
Harvard School of Public Health

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
BMJ
Do wearable baby monitors offer parents real peace of mind?
Wearable devices for infants offer to give parents peace of mind, but are they being lulled into a false sense of security, asks an article in the BMJ this week?

Contact: Emma Dickinson
edickinson@bmj.com
44-020-738-36529
BMJ-British Medical Journal

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
BMJ
Genetically low vitamin D associated with increased mortality
Genetically low vitamin D levels are associated with increased all cause mortality, (including cancer), but not with cardiovascular mortality, finds a large Danish study published in the BMJ this week.

Contact: Emma Dickinson
edickinson@bmj.com
44-020-738-36529
BMJ-British Medical Journal

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
BMJ
Stressful duties linked with increased risk of sudden cardiac death among police officers
Stressful and physically demanding law enforcement activities are associated with large increases in the risk of sudden cardiac death among US police officers compared with routine policing activities, finds a study published in the BMJ this week.

Contact: Emma Dickinson
edickinson@bmj.com
44-020-738-36529
BMJ-British Medical Journal

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
Nature
Protected area expansion target: Is a huge promise lost due to land conversion?
By expanding the protected area network to 17 percent of land one could triple the present protection levels of terrestrial vertebrates. Globally coordinated protected area network expansion could deliver a result 50 percent more efficient compared to countries looking only at biodiversity within their own area. Land conversion is, however, fast degrading options for conservation.
European Research Council, Academy of Finland Center of Excellence Program

Contact: Atte Moilanen
atte.moilanen@helsinki.fi
358-504-484-493
University of Helsinki

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
PeerJ
Unexpected cross-species contamination in genome sequencing projects
As genome sequencing has gotten faster and cheaper, the pace of whole-genome sequencing has accelerated, dramatically increasing the number of genomes deposited in public archives. Although these genomes are a valuable resource, problems can arise when researchers misapply computational methods to assemble them, or accidentally introduce unnoticed contaminations during sequencing.

Contact: Steven Salzberg
salzberg@jhu.edu
410-614-6112
PeerJ

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
American Public Health Association's Annual Meeting & Exposition
From Big-Data injury prevention to mapping travel for prenatal care and beyond
Researchers from Drexel University in Philadelphia will present research on a wide range of public health topics emphasizing urban health challenges, geographic methods in public health, community resilience and more, at the 142nd annual meeting and exposition of the American Public Health Association Nov. 15-19.

Contact: Rachel Ewing
raewing@drexel.edu
215-895-2614
Drexel University

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
mBio
Some flu viruses potentially more dangerous than others
Certain subtypes of avian influenza viruses have the potential to cause more severe disease in humans than other avian influenza subtypes and should be monitored carefully to prevent spread of disease, according to a study published this week in mBio, the online open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology.

Contact: Garth Hogan
ghogan@asmusa.org
American Society for Microbiology

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
Neuroscience 2014
High-fructose diet in adolescence may exacerbate depressive-like behavior
When animals consume a diet high in fructose throughout adolescence, it can worsen depressive- and anxiety-like behavior and alter how the brain responds to stress.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Quinn Eastman
qeastma@emory.edu
404-727-7829
Emory Health Sciences

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
Journal of Neuroscience
Seniors draw on extra brainpower for shopping
Holiday shopping can be mentally exhausting for anyone. But a new study finds that older adults seem to need extra brainpower to make shopping decisions -- especially ones that rely on memory. The Duke University study, appearing Nov. 19 in the Journal of Neuroscience, suggests that older shoppers draw on resources from an additional brain area to remember competing consumer products and choose the better one.
NIH/National Institute on Aging

Contact: Karl Bates
karl.bates@duke.edu
919-681-8054
Duke University

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
American Public Health Association's Annual Meeting & Exposition
New school meal requirements: More harm than good?
New federal regulations requiring school meals to contain more whole grains, less saturated fat and more fruits and vegetables, while perhaps improving some aspects of the food being served at schools across the United States, may also be perpetuating eating habits linked to obesity, diabetes and other diet-related diseases, an analysis by Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health researchers has found.

Contact: Barbara Benham
bbenham1@jhu.edu
410-614-6029
Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
Neuroscience 2014
Songbirds help scientists develop cooling technique to safely map the human brain
A new diagnostic technique -- resulting from monitoring thousands of courtship calls from songbirds -- can be used to safely map the human brain during complex neurosurgery, according to research from Neuroscientists at NYU Langone Medical Center and elsewhere.

Contact: David March
david.march@nyumc.org
212-404-3528
NYU Langone Medical Center / New York University School of Medicine

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
Neuroscience 2014
Mother's soothing presence makes pain go away -- and changes gene activity in infant brain
A mother's 'TLC' not only can help soothe pain in infants, but it may also impact early brain development by altering gene activity in a part of the brain involved in emotions, according to new study from NYU Langone Medical Center.

Contact: David March
david.march@nyumc.org
212-404-3528
NYU Langone Medical Center / New York University School of Medicine

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
Biology Letters
Warmer temperatures limit impact of parasites, boost pest populations
Research shows that some insect pests are thriving in warm, urban environments and developing earlier, limiting the impact of parasitoid wasps that normally help keep those pest populations in check.
US Department of Interior, US Department of Agriculture, National Science Foundation

Contact: Matt Shipman
matt_shipman@ncsu.edu
919-515-6386
North Carolina State University

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2014
New study finds testosterone replacement therapy does not increase cardiovascular risks
An important new study of men who have undergone testosterone replacement therapy has found that taking supplemental testosterone does not increase their risk of experiencing a major adverse cardiac event, such as a heart attack or stroke.

Contact: Jess C. Gomez
jess.gomez@imail.org
801-507-7455
Intermountain Medical Center

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
Radiology
US radiology departments prepare for Ebola
Radiologists from the National Institutes of Health and Emory University School of Medicine have issued a special report on radiology preparedness for handling cases of Ebola virus. The report, outlining their protocols and recommendations, is published in the online edition of the journal Radiology.

Contact: Linda Brooks
lbrooks@rsna.org
630-590-7762
Radiological Society of North America

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
PLOS Medicine
Computerized cognitive training has modest benefits for cognitively healthy older adults
Computerized cognitive training (CCT) has been widely promoted for older adults, but its effectiveness for cognitively health older adults has been unclear in systematic reviews to date. In a new systematic review and meta-analysis published in this week's issue of PLOS Medicine, Michael Valenzuela and colleagues found a small overall effect of CCT on performance of cognitive tests that were not included in the training program.
Dreikurs Bequest, National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia

Contact: Maya Sandler
medicinepress@plos.org
PLOS

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
Biophysical Journal
New computational model could design medications like chemotherapy with fewer side effects
Medications, such as chemotherapy, are often limited by their tendency to be detrimental to healthy cells as an unintended side effect. Now research in the Nov. 18 issue of Cell Press's Biophysical Journal offers a new computational model that can help investigators design ways to direct drugs to their specific targets.

Contact: Mary Beth O'Leary
moleary@cell.com
617-397-2802
Cell Press

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research
Childhood adversity hinders genetic protection against problem drinking in white men
The alcohol metabolizing gene ADH1B is strongly linked to risk for alcohol use disorders (AUDs). The His allele at ADHD1B-rs1229984 is considered protective against AUDs. Experiencing adverse events during childhood -- physical or sexual abuse or witnessing violence -- is a risk factor for AUDs. Research has found that under conditions of childhood adversity, the ADH1B His allele does not exert its protective effects against problem drinking in European-American men.
National Institutes of Health, Robert E. Leet and Clara Guthrie Patterson Trust, APA/Merck Early Academic Career Award Program, VA CT and Philadelphia VA Mental Illness Research, Education, and Clinical Centers

Contact: Carolyn E. Sartor, Ph.D.
carolyn.sartor@yale.edu
203-937-3894
Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research
Chronic alcohol intake can damage white matter pathways across the entire brain
Chronic misuse of alcohol results in measurable damage to the brain. A new study uses high-resolution structural magnetic resonance scans to compare the brains of individuals with a history of alcoholism versus those of healthy light drinkers. The abstinent alcoholics showed pronounced reductions in frontal and superior white matter tracts.
Veterans Affairs, National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Contact: Catherine Brawn Fortier, Ph.D.
catherine_fortier@hms.harvard.edu
857-364-4361
Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research
Youths with a family history of substance use disorders have less efficient forebrain
Youths with a family history of alcohol and other drug use disorders have a greater risk of developing substance-use disorders (SUDs) themselves than their peers with no such family histories. A new study examines forebrain activity in youths with and without a family history of SUDs. Findings indicate that youths with a family history have forebrain regions that function less efficiently.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH/National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering

Contact: Will Sansom
sansom@uthscsa.edu
210-567-2579

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
eLife
A sweet bacterium keeps track of time
Researchers are studying the Caulobacter crescentus bacterium because of its developmental process and cellular cycle, which serve as models for a number of pathogenic bacteria. They all have in common the use of polysaccharides to create a particularly effective protective envelope, or capsule. Professor Viollier's laboratory at the University of Geneva's Faculty of Medicine has just unraveled the secrets of capsule formation during the cellular cycle and perhaps even identified potential Achilles' heel of bacteria.

Contact: Silvia Ardissone
silvia.ardissone@unige.ch
41-223-795-515
Université de Genève

Showing releases 351-375 out of 572.

<< < 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 > >>