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Showing releases 351-375 out of 485.

<< < 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 > >>

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
NASA sees Typhoon Kalmaegi as a whirlpool of clouds in the South China Sea
NASA's Aqua satellite observed Typhoon Kalmaegi crossing the South China Sea and a satellite image from the MODIS instrument aboard made it look like a whirlpool of clouds.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
Satellites show Edouard's transition into an Atlantic Hurricane
NASA's Terra satellite passed over Tropical Storm Edouard each day from Sept. 12-14 and captured imagery of the storm as it grew into a hurricane. NOAA's GOES-East satellite covers the Atlantic Ocean and takes visible images during the day and infrared images at night to show the movement of weather systems. Those images were compiled into a movie from Sept. 13 through 15 showing movement and intensification of Edouard into a hurricane. NASA's HS3 Mission also investigated the storm.
nasa

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
Satellite sees Tropical Depression 16-E remnants scooped by Hurricane Odile
At 11 p.m. EDT on Sunday, Sept. 14, Tropical Depression 16-E was officially a remnant low pressure area. NOAA's GOES-West satellite showed the clouds associated with the remnants being drawn into the massive circulation of nearby Hurricane Odile.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
eLife
Decoding virus-host interactions in the oxygen-starved ocean
In certain coastal areas, severe reductions in oxygen levels in the water destroy food web structure. Over the past 50 years, such oxygen minimum zones have expanded due to climate change and increased waste run-off. Reported in the journal eLife, a collaboration between researchers from the Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute, the University of British Columbia, and University of Arizona studied how viral infection influences a microbial community in one such OMZ.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: David Gilbert
degilbert@lbl.gov
DOE/Joint Genome Institute

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
Earth and Planetary Science Letters
Early Earth less hellish than previously thought
Conditions on Earth during its first 500 million years may have been cool enough to form oceans of water instead of being too hot for life to form.
National Science Foundation, National Geographic Society, Keck Geology Consortium

Contact: David Salisbury
david.salisbury@vanderbilt.edu
615-343-6803
Vanderbilt University

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Network measures predict neuropsychological outcome after brain injury
In research published online Sept. 15 in the Early Edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, scientists studied neurological patients with focal brain damage, and found that damage to six hub locations -- identified in a model developed at Washington University using resting state fMRI, functional connectivity analyses, and graph theory -- produced much greater cognitive impairment than damage to other locations.
National Institutes of Health, McDonnell Foundation, Simons Foundation, NIH/National Institutes of Mental Health

Contact: John Riehl
john-riehl@uiowa.edu
319-384-3109
University of Iowa Health Care

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
American Political Science Association Annual Meeting
When rulers can't understand the ruled
A Johns Hopkins study finds a significant gap in demographics, experience and partisanship between Washington insiders and the Americans they govern.

Contact: Jill Rosen
jrosen@jhu.edu
443-997-9906
Johns Hopkins University

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
iPhone chemistry: Elements of a smartphone
We've got all the details about Apple's latest iPhone and the lines are probably forming somewhere for the Sept. 19 launch. But what do you really know about the guts of the iPhone 6, or any smartphone for that matter? Reactions teamed up once again with the Compound Interest blog to find the chemical elements lurking inside a smartphone.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
American Psychologist
Oregon researchers urge psychologists to see institutional betrayal
Two University of Oregon researchers are urging clinical psychologists to recognize experiences of institutional betrayal so that they can better treat their patients and respond in ways that help avoid or repair damaged trust when it occurs in their own institutions.

Contact: Jim Barlow
jebarlow@uoregon.edu
541-346-3481
University of Oregon

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Neuroscientists identify key role of language gene
Neuroscientists have found that a gene mutation that arose more than half a million years ago may be key to humans' unique ability to produce and understand speech.
Nancy Lurie Marks Family Foundation, Simons Foundation, National Institutes of Health, Wellcome Trust, Foundation pour la Recherche Medicale, Max Planck Society

Contact: Sarah McDonnell
s_mcd@mit.edu
617-253-8923
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
BMC Public Health
Dental and nutrition experts call for radical rethink on free sugars intake
Sugars in the diet should make up no more than 3 percent of total energy intake to reduce the significant financial and social burdens of tooth decay, finds new research from University College London and the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine.

Contact: Harry Dayantis
h.dayantis@ucl.ac.uk
44-020-310-83844
University College London

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
Journal of Health and Social Behavior
Poverty-obesity link is more prevalent for women than men, study shows
A new University of Texas Austin sociology study shows young women growing up in poor households are at higher risk of obesity than their male counterparts, and are more likely to suffer from discrimination throughout the life course.

Contact: Tetyana Pudrovska
tpudrovs@austin.utexas.edu
512-471-2404
University of Texas at Austin

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
Nature Communications
Northeastern University researchers develop novel method for working with nanotubes
Northeastern University researchers have developed a novel method for controllably constructing precise inter-nanotube junctions and a variety of nanocarbon structures in carbon nanotube arrays. The researchers were able to tailor the physical properties of nanotube networks for use in applications from electronic devices to carbon nanotube-reinforced composite materials found in cars and sports equipment. The findings were published in a Nature Communications paper titled 'Sculpting carbon bonds for allotropic transformation through solid-state re-engineering of –sp2 carbon.'
National Science Foundation, The Republic of Korea Ministry of Industry

Contact: John O'Neill
j.oneill@neu.edu
617-373-5460
Northeastern University

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
Social Science & Medicine
Long-term effects of childhood asthma influenced by socioeconomic status
Studies have shown that asthma is associated with attention and behavioral issues in children, yet little existing research examines how socioeconomic status may influence the ultimate effects of these difficulties. Now, a University of Missouri researcher has found that the overall outcomes for children with asthma are influenced by socioeconomic inequalities.
National Science Foundation, American Educational Research Association

Contact: Jesslyn Chew
ChewJ@missouri.edu
573-882-8353
University of Missouri-Columbia

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
The Journal of Pediatrics
Delay in age of walking can herald muscular dystrophy in boys with cognitive delays
The timing of a toddler's first steps is an important developmental milestone, but a slight delay in walking is typically not a cause of concern by itself. Now a duo of Johns Hopkins researchers has found that when walking and cognitive delays occur in concert, the combination could comprise the earliest of signals heralding a rare but devastating disorder known as Duchenne muscular dystrophy.
Dana and Albert R. Broccoli Charitable Foundation

Contact: Ekaterina Pesheva
epeshev1@jhmi.edu
410-502-9433
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
BioEssays
Genes may help explain why some people are naturally more interested in music than others
Research suggests that genes that affect hearing and cognitive function may play roles in one's musical aptitude, or the ability to understand and perceive rhythm, pitch, timbre, tone durations, and formal structure in music.

Contact: Nicole Weingartner
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
201-748-5808
Wiley

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Researchers control surface tension to manipulate liquid metals
Researchers have developed a technique for controlling the surface tension of liquid metals by applying very low voltages, opening the door to a new generation of reconfigurable electronic circuits, antennas and other technologies.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Matt Shipman
matt_shipman@ncsu.edu
919-515-6386
North Carolina State University

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
Journal of Personality
A thin line lies between fantasy and reality in people with psychopathic traits
New research indicates that people with psychopathic traits have a preference for nonromantic sexual fantasies with anonymous and uncommitted partners. The study's investigators noted that psychopathic sexual behavior is likely due to a preference for sexual activity outside a loving, committed relationship rather than only an inability to form such relationships.

Contact: Nicole Weingartner
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
201-748-5808
Wiley

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
'Femme fatale' emerald ash borer decoy lures and kills males
An international team of researchers has designed decoys that mimic female emerald ash borer beetles and successfully entice male emerald ash borers to land on them in an attempt to mate, only to be electrocuted and killed by high-voltage current.
US Department of Agriculture, Hungarian Academy of Sciences

Contact: A'ndrea Elyse Messer
aem1@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
Journal of Clinical Lipidology
Report urges individualized, cholesterol-targeted approach to heart disease and stroke
A recent guideline for using statins to reduce atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease has wavered too far from the simple cholesterol goals that have saved thousands of lives in the past decade, and doesn't adequately treat patients as individuals, experts said today in a national report.

Contact: Matthew Ito
matt.ito@oregonstate.edu
503-494-3657
Oregon State University

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
American Journal of Political Science
Does having daughters cause judges to rule for women's issues?
Judges with daughters consistently vote in a more feminist fashion on gender issues than judges who have only sons, and the effect appears to be driven primarily by Republican judges.

Contact: Nicole Weingartner
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
201-748-5808
Wiley

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication
Habitual Facebook users: Suckers for social media scams?
A new study finds that habitual use of Facebook makes individuals susceptible to social media phishing attacks by criminals, likely because they automatically respond to requests without considering how they are connected with those sending the requests, how long they have known them, or who else is connected with them.

Contact: Nicole Weingartner
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
201-748-5808
Wiley

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
American Journal of Political Science
People are attracted to the body odor of others with similar political beliefs
A new study reveals that people find the smell of others with similar political opinions to be attractive, suggesting that one of the reasons why so many spouses share similar political views is because they were initially and subconsciously attracted to each other's body odor.

Contact: Nicole Weingartner
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
201-748-5808
Wiley

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
International Journal of Wildland Fire
Cost-share programs encourage most to mitigate wildfire danger
Most homeowners are willing to take part in cost-sharing that helps pay for wildfire risk mitigation on their properties, but some of those with the highest wildfire risk are the least likely to participate in those programs, according to a collaborative study by the University of Colorado Boulder and partnering institutions.

Contact: James Meldrum
James.Meldrum@colorado.edu
University of Colorado at Boulder

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
Nature Climate Change
Small algae with great potential
The single most important calcifying algae of the world's oceans is able to simultaneously adapt to rising water temperatures and ocean acidification through evolution. A unique long-term experiment with the species Emiliania huxleyi at GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel shows that the evolutionary potential of the algae is much greater than previously thought. In their laboratory evolution experiment, the scientists have shown for the first time that evolutionary adaptations to multiple stress factors do not necessarily interfere with each other.

Contact: Maike Nicolai
mnicolai@geomar.de
49-431-600-2807
Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel (GEOMAR)

Showing releases 351-375 out of 485.

<< < 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 > >>