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Showing releases 351-375 out of 401.

<< < 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 > >>

Public Release: 13-Apr-2014
Nature Materials
Tiny particles could help verify goods
Chemical engineers at MIT hope smartphone-readable microparticles could crack down on counterfeiting.
US Air Force, Director of Defense Research and Engineering, Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology, National Science Foundation, US Army Research Office, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Sarah McDonnell
s_mcd@mit.edu
617-253-8923
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 13-Apr-2014
Nature Genetics
Virus-fighting genes linked to mutations in cancer
All cancer-causing processes leave a distinct mutational imprint or signature on the genomes of patients. A team from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute has found a major piece of biological evidence to support the role a group of virus-fighting genes has in cancer development. The mutational signature left by the cancer-causing process driven by this family of genes is found in half of all cancer types.

Contact: Mary Clarke
press.office@sanger.ac.uk
44-012-234-95328
Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute

Public Release: 13-Apr-2014
Nature Neuroscience
New mouse model could revolutionize research in Alzheimer's disease
In a study published today in Nature Neuroscience, a group of researchers led by Takaomi Saido of the RIKEN Brain Science Institute in Japan have reported the creation of two new mouse models of Alzheimer's disease that may potentially revolutionize research into this disease.

Contact: Jens Wilkinson
pr@riken.jp
81-048-462-1225
RIKEN

Public Release: 13-Apr-2014
Nature Materials
Glasses strong as steel: A fast way to find the best
Scientists at Yale have devised a dramatically faster way of identifying and characterizing complex alloys known as bulk metallic glasses, a versatile type of pliable glass that's stronger than steel.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy

Contact: Eric Gershon
eric.gershon@yale.edu
203-432-8555
Yale University

Public Release: 13-Apr-2014
Genetics & Development
Gene linked to pediatric kidney cancer suggests new strategies for kidney regeneration
Nearly one-third of cases of Wilms tumor, a pediatric cancer of the kidney, are linked to a gene called Lin28, according to research from Boston Children's Hospital. Mice engineered to express Lin28 in their kidneys developed Wilms tumor, which regressed when Lin28 was withdrawn, indicating that strategies aimed at blocking or deactivating the gene hold therapeutic promise. Studies also suggest that controlled expression of Lin28 can promote kidney development and therefore may hold clues to regeneration of damaged adult kidneys.
Ellison Medical Foundation and others

Contact: Irene Sege
irene.sege@childrens.harvard.edu
617-919-3110
Boston Children's Hospital

Public Release: 13-Apr-2014
Nature Materials
How a Silly Putty ingredient could advance stem cell therapies
The sponginess of the environment where human embryonic stem cells are growing affects the type of specialized cells they eventually become, a University of Michigan study shows.

Contact: Nicole Casal Moore
ncmoore@umich.edu
734-647-7087
University of Michigan

Public Release: 13-Apr-2014
Nature Climate Change
Fish from acidic ocean waters less able to smell predators
Fish living on coral reefs where carbon dioxide seeps from the ocean floor were less able to detect predator odor than fish from normal coral reefs, according to a new study.
Australian Institute for Marine Science, National Geographic Society

Contact: Brett Israel
brett.israel@comm.gatech.edu
404-385-1933
Georgia Institute of Technology

Public Release: 13-Apr-2014
Nature Neuroscience
Hereditary trauma
Extreme and traumatic events can change a person -- and often, years later, even affect their children. Researchers of the University of Zurich and ETH Zurich have now unmasked a piece in the puzzle of how the inheritance of traumas may be mediated.

Contact: Isabelle Mansuy
imansuy@ethz.ch
41-446-353-360
ETH Zurich

Public Release: 13-Apr-2014
Nature Medicine
Mechanism, and possible treatment, for immune suppression in liver disease uncovered
The mechanism which underlies the susceptibility of liver disease patients to life-threatening infection has been uncovered by Wellcome Trust-funded medical scientists, who have also suggested a possible treatment to reverse immune suppression in these patients.
Wellcome Trust

Contact: Clare Ryan
c.ryan@wellcome.ac.uk
44-020-761-17261
Wellcome Trust

Public Release: 13-Apr-2014
Society for General Microbiology Annual Conference 2014
Reduction in HPV in young women in England seen, following national immunization program
A study conducted by Public Health England shows a reduction in two High Risk human papillomavirus types in sexually active young women in England, following the introduction of a national immunization program.

Contact: Francesca McNeil
infections-pressoffice@phe.gov.uk
44-020-832-77901
Society for General Microbiology

Public Release: 12-Apr-2014
International Liver Congress 2014
New interferon-free, all-oral 3D regimen achieves high SVR in chronic HCV genotype 1 patients
The new interferon-free, all-oral, three direct-acting-antiviral treatment regimen in development by AbbVie has achieved very high rates of virological response in patients chronically infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1; according to the results of three studies presented today at the International Liver Congress 2014.

Contact: Courtney Lock
courtney.lock@cohnwolfe.com
44-789-438-6422
European Association for the Study of the Liver

Public Release: 12-Apr-2014
International Liver Congress 2014
New data for HCV genotype 4 patients with simeprevir- and sofosbuvir-based regimens
Results from RESTORE , a Phase III, multi-center, single-arm, open-label study presented today at the International Liver Congress 2014 showed that simeprevir 150 mg once-daily for 12 weeks in combination with peginterferon and ribavirin (followed by 12 or 36 weeks of peginterferon and ribavirin) was effective and well tolerated in hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 4-infected patients, consistent with previous observations in HCV genotype 1-infected patients.

Contact: Courtney Lock
courtney.lock@cohnwolfe.com
44-789-438-6422
European Association for the Study of the Liver

Public Release: 12-Apr-2014
International Liver Congress 2014
New advances in HCC diagnosis, staging and treatment all predicted to improve patient outcomes
Epidemiological, genetic and clinical data presented today at the International Liver Congress 2014 are collectively focussed on different approaches designed to improve the diagnosis, staging and treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma.

Contact: Courtney Lock
courtney.lock@cohnwolfe.com
44-789-438-6422
European Association for the Study of the Liver

Public Release: 12-Apr-2014
International Liver Congress 2014
Low vitamin D linked to fatty liver disease in UK children
A UK study investigating the link between low vitamin D status and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in British children has identified a genetic variant associated with the disease's severity.

Contact: Courtney Lock
courtney.lock@cohnwolfe.com
44-789-438-6422
European Association for the Study of the Liver

Public Release: 12-Apr-2014
International Liver Congress 2014
Gut microbiota may play a role in the development of alcoholic liver disease
Exciting new data presented today at the International Liver Congress 2014 shows that the gut microbiota has a potential role in the development of alcoholic liver disease.

Contact: Courtney Lock
courtney.lock@cohnwolfe.com
44-789-438-6422
European Association for the Study of the Liver

Public Release: 12-Apr-2014
International Liver Congress 2014
Impressive SVR12 data for once-daily combination to treat HCV genotype 1 patients
Results from three Phase III clinical trials evaluating the investigational once-daily fixed-dose combination of the nucleotide analogue polymerase inhibitor sofosbuvir 400mg and the NS5A inhibitor ledipasvir 90mg, with and without ribavirin, for the treatment of genotype 1 chronic hepatitis C virus infection have been presented at the International Liver Congress 2014.

Contact: Courtney Lock
courtney.lock@cohnwolfe.com
44-789-438-6422
European Association for the Study of the Liver

Public Release: 12-Apr-2014
International Liver Congress 2014
New Chinese herbal medicine has significant potential in treating hepatitis C
Data from a late-breaking abstract presented at the International Liver Congress 2014 identifies a new compound, SBEL1, that has the ability to inhibit hepatitis C virus activity in cells at several points in the virus' lifecycle.

Contact: Courtney Lock
courtney.lock@cohnwolfe.com
44-789-438-6422
European Association for the Study of the Liver

Public Release: 12-Apr-2014
International Liver Congress 2014
Three new studies help clarify optimal use of combination therapy in chronic hepatitis B patients
Three new studies presented today at the International Liver Congress 2014 have helped clarify the optimal use of combination therapy with peginterferon and nucleoside analogues to achieve the best treatment outcomes in patients with chronic hepatitis B.

Contact: Courtney Lock
courtney.lock@cohnwolfe.com
44-789-438-6422
European Association for the Study of the Liver

Public Release: 12-Apr-2014
International Liver Congress 2014
Obeticholic acid produces meaningful biochemical and clinical improvements in PBC cirrhosis patients
Results from an international Phase III study presented today at the International Liver Congress 2014 have shown obeticholic acid given to patients suffering from primary biliary cirrhosis who previously had an inadequate response to, or have been unable to tolerate ursodeoxycholic acid, produced meaningful biochemical and clinical improvements.

Contact: Courtney Lock
courtney.lock@cohnwolfe.com
44-789-438-6422
European Association for the Study of the Liver

Public Release: 12-Apr-2014
International Liver Congress 2014
New England Journal of Medicine
Hepatitis C treatment cures over 90 percent of patients with cirrhosis
Twelve weeks of an investigational oral therapy cured hepatitis C infection in more than 90 percent of patients with liver cirrhosis and was well tolerated by these patients, according to an international study that included researchers from UT Medicine San Antonio and the Texas Liver Institute.

Contact: Will Sansom
sansom@uthscsa.edu
210-567-2579
University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio

Public Release: 12-Apr-2014
International Liver Congress 2014
New England Journal of Medicine
New combination drug therapy proves very effective in hepatitis C treatments
Treatment options for the 170 million people worldwide with chronic hepatitis C virus are evolving rapidly, although the available regimens often come with significant side effects. Two multi-center clinical trials led by Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center show promise for a new option that could help lead to both an increase in patients cured with a much more simple and tolerable all oral therapy.
Gilead Sciences

Contact: Jerry Berger
jberger@bidmc.harvard.edu
617-667-7308
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

Public Release: 11-Apr-2014
Cell Reports
UAlberta researchers examine metabolism in defective cells
Manipulating the metabolic process in cells may compensate for defects that can shorten cell life.
Canadian Institutes for Health Research, Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada

Contact: Amy Hewko
ahewko@ualberta.ca
780-492-0647
University of Alberta Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry

Public Release: 11-Apr-2014
Diabetic Medicine
Women with diabetes less likely to have a mammogram: Study
Women with diabetes are 14 percent less likely to be screened for breast cancer compared to women without diabetes, according to a study by researchers at the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences and Women's College Hospital.

Contact: Julie Saccone
julie.saccone@wchospital.ca
416-323-6400 x4054
Women's College Hospital

Public Release: 11-Apr-2014
American Journal of Botany
Berkeley graduate student brings extinct plants to life
Most fossilized plants are fragments indistinguishable from a stick, but a UC Berkeley graduate student hopes a new technique will allow paleontologists to more precisely identify these fossils. Jeff Benca showed the power of this technique by turning a 375 million-year-old lycopod fossil into a life-like rendering that made the cover of the centennial issue of the American Journal of Botany.

Contact: Robert Sanders
rlsanders@berkeley.edu
510-643-6998
University of California - Berkeley

Public Release: 11-Apr-2014
Warming climate has consequences for Michigan's forests
A new assessment evaluates the vulnerability of forest ecosystems within a 16.6-million-acre area in Michigan's eastern Upper Peninsula and northern Lower Peninsula, about 70 percent of the state's forested land cover. Topics covered include information on the contemporary landscape, past climate trends, and a range of projected future climates.

Contact: Jane Hodgins
jmhodgins@fs.fed.us
651-649-5281
USDA Forest Service - Northern Research Station

Showing releases 351-375 out of 401.

<< < 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 > >>