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Showing releases 376-400 out of 422.

<< < 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 > >>

Public Release: 14-Aug-2014
Ecological Society of America Annual Meeting
Lionfish characteristics make them more 'terminator' than predator
New research on the predatory nature of red lionfish, the invasive species that is decimating native fish populations in parts of the Caribbean Sea and Atlantic Ocean, seems to indicate that lionfish are not just a predator, but more like the 'terminator' of movie fame. In behavior that is called 'alarming,' it appears that in some cases lionfish will continue to hunt until the last fish of a local population is dead.
National Science Foundation, Cape Eleuthera Institute of the Bahamas

Contact: Kurt Ingeman
ingemank@science.oregonstate.edu
541-908-0805
Oregon State University

Public Release: 14-Aug-2014
Cell
Inside the cell, an ocean of buffeting waves
Harvard-led researchers put forth a new model of the cytoplasm as a gel, not a liquid, and demonstrate that ATP-driven processes are indirectly responsible for transport within the cell. A measurement of the spectrum of forces exerted on the cytoplasm at any given time can provide a snapshot of the metabolic state of the cell.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research, Hannah's Hope Fund

Contact: Caroline Perry
cperry@seas.harvard.edu
617-496-1351
Harvard University

Public Release: 14-Aug-2014
ESC Congress 2014
Lancet
The Lancet: European Society of Cardiology Congress media alert
The Lancet is pleased to announce that the following papers will be published ahead of the European Society of Cardiology Congress 2014, taking place in Barcelona, Spain, from Aug. 30-Sept. 3, 2014. This includes a special Series of three papers on lipids and cardiovascular disease.

Contact: Dr. Johan Sundström
johan.sundstrom@medsci.uu.se
46-704-225-220
The Lancet

Public Release: 14-Aug-2014
Lancet
The Lancet: virus-like particle vaccine shows promise against chikungunya
The first human trial of a new vaccine developed using non-infectious virus-like particles appears likely to offer protection against chikungunya virus, a mosquito-borne infection, according to a study published in The Lancet. Since its re-emergence in 2004, chikungunya virus has become a growing public-health threat that has affected millions of people in Africa, Asia, and Europe, and in recent months it has been spreading throughout the Americas.

Contact: the NIAID Office of Communications
niaidnews@niaid.nih.gov
301-402-1663
The Lancet

Public Release: 14-Aug-2014
The Lancet
Experimental chikungunya vaccine induces robust antibody response
An experimental vaccine to prevent the mosquito-borne viral illness chikungunya elicited neutralizing antibodies in all 25 adult volunteers who participated in a recent early-stage clinical trial conducted by researchers at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health. The results are reported in the current issue of the Lancet.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases
niaidnews@niaid.nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 14-Aug-2014
Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism
Vitamin D deficiency may reduce pregnancy rate in women undergoing IVF
Women with a vitamin D deficiency were nearly half as likely to conceive through in vitro fertilization as women who had sufficient levels of the vitamin, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

Contact: Jenni Glenn Gingery
jgingery@endocrine.org
202-971-3655
The Endocrine Society

Public Release: 14-Aug-2014
Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism
Reduced testosterone tied to endocrine-disrupting chemical exposure
Men, women and children exposed to high levels of phthalates -- endocrine-disrupting chemicals found in plastics and some personal care products -- tended to have reduced levels of testosterone in their blood compared to those with lower chemical exposure, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

Contact: Jenni Glenn Gingery
jgingery@endocrine.org
202-971-3655
The Endocrine Society

Public Release: 14-Aug-2014
Neuron
Researchers develop strategy to combat genetic ALS, FTD
A team of researchers at Mayo Clinic and The Scripps Research Institute in Florida have developed a new therapeutic strategy to combat the most common genetic risk factor for the neurodegenerative disorders amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (also known as Lou Gehrig's disease) and frontotemporal dementia.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Institute on Aging, NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Services, IS Department of Defense

Contact: Kevin Punsky
punsky.kevin@mayo.edu
904-953-0746
Mayo Clinic

Public Release: 14-Aug-2014
American Journal of Public Health
Strong state alcohol policies reduce likelihood of binge drinking
People living in states with stronger alcohol policy environments have a substantially lower likelihood of any binge drinking, frequent binge drinking, and high-intensity binge drinking, according to a new study by researchers at the Boston University School of Public Health and Boston Medical Center, published in the current issue of the American Journal of Public Health.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Lisa Chedekel
Chedekel@bu.edu
617-571-6370
Boston University Medical Center

Public Release: 14-Aug-2014
Nature Communications
Newborns' genetic code sends infection distress signal
Babies suffering from life-threatening bacterial infections such as sepsis could benefit from improved treatment, thanks to a ground-breaking study. For the first time, researchers have been able to detect and decode a signal generated from a baby's DNA that can tell doctors whether or not a bacterial infection is present in the bloodstream. The findings could help develop a test for bacterial infection in newborns, using a single drop of blood.
Wellcome Trust, Chief Scientist Office, European Union, Biotechnology, Biological Sciences Research Council, Engineering, Physical Sciences Research Council, Medical Research Council

Contact: Eleanor Cowie
eleanor.cowie@ed.ac.uk
44-131-650-6382
University of Edinburgh

Public Release: 14-Aug-2014
Nature Communications
Immune cell discovery could help to halt cancer spread
Melbourne researchers have revealed the critical importance of highly specialized immune cells, called natural killer cells, in killing melanoma cells that have spread to the lungs. These natural killer cells could be harnessed to hunt down and kill cancers that have spread in the body. The team, from the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute, also found natural killer cells were critical to the body's rejection of donor bone marrow transplants and in the runaway immune response during toxic shock syndrome.
Australian National Health and Medical Research Council, Menzies Foundation, Victorian Government

Contact: Liz Williams
williams@wehi.edu.au
61-428-034-089
Walter and Eliza Hall Institute

Public Release: 14-Aug-2014
Science
A self-organizing thousand-robot swarm
The first thousand-robot flash mob has assembled at Harvard University.
National Science Foundation, Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering

Contact: Caroline Perry
cperry@seas.harvard.edu
617-496-1351
Harvard University

Public Release: 14-Aug-2014
Cancer Research
Protein found to block benefits of vitamin A cancer therapy
Retinoic acid is a form of vitamin A that is used to treat and help prevent the recurrence of a variety of cancers, but for some patients the drug is not effective. The reason for this resistance was unclear until this week when researchers from Virginia Commonwealth University Massey Cancer Center demonstrated that a protein known as AEG-1 blocks the effects of retinoic acid in leukemia and liver cancer.
National Institutes of Health, James S. McDonnel Foundation

Contact: Alaina Schneider
afschneider@vcu.edu
804-628-4578
Virginia Commonwealth University

Public Release: 14-Aug-2014
Science
Message to parents: Babies don't 'start from scratch'
There's now overwhelming evidence that a child's future health is influenced by more than just their parents' genetic material, and that children born of unhealthy parents will already be pre-programmed for greater risk of poor health, according to University of Adelaide researchers.

Contact: Sarah Robertson
sarah.robertson@adelaide.edu.au
61-883-134-094
University of Adelaide

Public Release: 14-Aug-2014
JAMA Ophthalmology
Prevalence, risk factors for diabetic macular edema explored in study
The odds of having diabetic macular edema, a leading cause of vision loss in patients with diabetes mellitus, appears to be higher in non-Hispanic black patients than white patients, as well as in those individuals who have had diabetes longer and have higher levels of hemoglobin A1c.

Contact: Alison Trinidad
alison.trinidad@usc.edu
323-442-3941
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 14-Aug-2014
Cell
Antibodies, together with viral 'inducers,' found to control HIV in mice
A new strategy devised by researchers at Rockefeller University harnesses the power of broadly neutralizing antibodies, along with a combination of compounds that induce viral transcription, in order to attack latent reservoirs of HIV-infected cells in an approach termed 'shock and kill.'
National Institutes of Health, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Contact: Zach Veilleux
zveilleux@rockefeller.edu
212-327-8982
Rockefeller University

Public Release: 14-Aug-2014
Science
Harnessing the power of bacteria's sophisticated immune system
Bacteria's ability to destroy viruses has long puzzled scientists, but researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health say they now have a clear picture of the bacterial immune system and say its unique shape is likely why bacteria can so quickly recognize and destroy their assailants.
NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences

Contact: Stephanie Desmon
sdesmon1@jhu.edu
410-955-7619
Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health

Public Release: 14-Aug-2014
American Journal of Public Health
Mass layoffs linked to increased teen suicide attempts
Mass layoffs trigger increased suicide attempts and other suicide-related behaviors among some teenagers, especially black teens, says new research from Duke University. When 1 percent of a state's working population lost jobs, suicide-related behaviors increased by 2 to 3 percent among girls and black adolescents in the following year. Among girls, thoughts of suicide and suicide plans rose. Among black teens, thoughts of suicide, suicide plans and suicide attempts all increased.
Smith Richardson Foundation, Foundation for Child Development, William T. Grant Foundation

Contact: Alison Jones
Alison.jones@duke.edu
919-681-8504
Duke University

Public Release: 14-Aug-2014
Cell
Researchers identify a mechanism that stops progression of abnormal cells into cancer
Researchers from Boston University School of Medicine report that a tumor suppressor pathway, called the Hippo pathway, is responsible for sensing abnormal chromosome numbers in cells and triggering cell cycle arrest, thus preventing progression into cancer.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Gina DiGravio
gina.digravio@bmc.org
617-638-8480
Boston University Medical Center

Public Release: 14-Aug-2014
Science
Memories of errors foster faster learning
Using a deceptively simple set of experiments, researchers at Johns Hopkins have learned why people learn an identical or similar task faster the second, third and subsequent time around. The reason: they are aided not only by memories of how to perform the task, but also by memories of the errors made the first time.
NIH/National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences, NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Contact: Shawna Williams
shawna@jhmi.edu
410-955-8236
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 14-Aug-2014
Cell
Tissue development 'roadmap' created to guide stem cell medicine
In a boon to stem cell research and regenerative medicine, scientists at Boston Children's Hospital, the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University and Boston University have created a computer algorithm called CellNet as a 'roadmap' for cell and tissue engineering, to ensure that cells engineered in the lab have the same favorable properties as cells in our own bodies.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, NIH/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, Children's Hospital Stem Cell Program, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Alex's Lemonade Stand Foundation

Contact: Kristen Dattoli
kristen.dattoli@childrens.harvard.edu
617-919-3110
Boston Children's Hospital

Public Release: 14-Aug-2014
BMC Ecology
Woodrats' genes help them to win the arms race against their food
A handful of genes arm the woodrat against the toxic chemicals in its foodstuff, the creosote plant, according to research published in the open-access journal BMC Ecology.

Contact: Anna Perman
Anna.Perman@biomedcentral.com
44-020-319-22429
BioMed Central

Public Release: 14-Aug-2014
Cell
Long antibiotic treatments: Slowly growing bacteria to blame
Whether pneumonia or sepsis -- infectious diseases are becoming increasingly difficult to treat. One reason for this is the growing antibiotic resistance. But even non-resistant bacteria can survive antibiotics for some time, and that's why treatments need to be continued for several days or weeks. Scientists at the Biozentrum of the University of Basel showed that bacteria with vastly different antibiotic sensitivity coexist within the same tissue. In the scientific journal Cell they report that, in particular, slowly growing pathogens hamper treatment.

Contact: Olivia Poisson
olivia.poisson@unibas.ch
University of Basel

Public Release: 14-Aug-2014
Journal of Neuroscience
Bypass commands from the brain to legs through a computer
A Japanese research group led by Shusaku Sasada, research fellow and Yukio Nishimura, associate professor of the National Institute for Physiological Sciences and National Institutes of Natural Sciences, has successfully made an artificial connection from the brain to the locomotion center in the spinal cord by bypassing with a computer and exercised control over walking. This result is published in The Journal of Neuroscience.

Contact: Yukio Nishimura
yukio@nips.ac.jp
National Institutes of Natural Sciences

Public Release: 14-Aug-2014
Cell
Scientists use lasers to control mouse brain switchboard
Using mice and flashes of light, scientists show that just a few nerve cells in the brain may control the switch between internal thoughts and external distractions. The study may be a breakthrough in understanding how a critical part of the brain, called the thalamic reticular nucleus, influences consciousness.
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Institute of General Medicine, National Science Foundation, Mathematical Biosciences Institute

Contact: Christopher G. Thomas
thomaschr@ninds.nih.gov
301-496-5751
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Showing releases 376-400 out of 422.

<< < 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 > >>