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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 376-400 out of 446.

<< < 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 > >>

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
27th European Congress of Neuropsychopharmacology
Researchers confirm the biochemical cause of seasonal depression
New research confirms why some people suffer from the winter blues while others get through the winter without any problems.

Contact: Press Officer
press@ecnp.eu
39-349-238-8191
European College of Neuropsychopharmacology

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
27th European Congress of Neuropsychopharmacology
Study shows no relationship between moderate adolescent cannabis use and exam results, IQ
A large UK study has found that occasional adolescent cannabis use does not lead to poorer educational and intellectual performance, but that heavy cannabis use is associated with slightly poorer exam results at age 16. The results come from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children a long-term study that follows the health of children born in the Bristol area in 1991 and 1992
UK Medical Research Council, Wellcome Trust, University of Bristol

Contact: Press Officer
press@ecnp.eu
39-349-238-8191
European College of Neuropsychopharmacology

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Translational Psychiatry
Rapid agent restores pleasure-seeking ahead of other antidepressant action
A drug being studied as a fast-acting mood-lifter restored pleasure-seeking behavior independent of -- and ahead of -- its other antidepressant effectsWithin 40 minutes after a single infusion of ketamine, treatment-resistant depressed bipolar disorder patients experienced a reversal of a key symptom -- loss of interest in pleasurable activities -- which lasted up to 14 days. Brain scans traced the agent's action to boosted activity in areas at the front and deep in the right hemisphere of the brain.
National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Jules Asher
NIMHpress@nih.gov
301-443-4536
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Journal of Policy Analysis and Management
Head Start program benefits parents
Head Start programs may help low-income parents improve their educational status, according to a new study by Northwestern University researchers. The study is one of the first to examine whether a child's participation in the federal program benefits mothers and fathers -- in particular parents' educational attainment and employment.

Contact: Julie Deardorff
julie.deardorff@northwestern.edu
847-491-4890
Northwestern University

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Nature Communications
Blind cave fish may provide insight on eye disease and other human health issues
Blind cave fish may not be the first thing that comes to mind when it comes to understanding human sight, but recent research indicates they may have quite a bit to teach us about the causes of many human ailments, including those that result in loss of sight. A team of researchers, led by Suzanne McGaugh, is looking to the tiny eyeless fish for clues about the underpinnings of degenerative eye disease and more.

Contact: Stephanie Xenos
sxenos@umn.edu
612-624-8723
University of Minnesota

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Mouse model provides new insight in to preeclampsia
A new study in the Journal of Clinical Investigation suggests that placental cells produce sFLT1 in response to maternal increases in VEGF, resulting in preeclampsia-like symptoms.

Contact: Corinne Williams
press_releases@the-jci.org
Journal of Clinical Investigation

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
ACG 2014
Males with IBS report more social stress than females, UB study finds
One of the few studies to examine gender differences among patients with irritable bowel syndrome has found that males with the condition experience more interpersonal difficulties than do females with the condition.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Ellen Goldbaum
goldbaum@buffalo.edu
716-645-4605
University at Buffalo

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Cytokine therapy enhances natural killer cell functions against tumor cells
A new study in the Journal of Clinical Investigation reveals that cytokine therapy enhances the activity of natural killer cells against tumors lacking MHC class I.

Contact: Corinne Williams
press_releases@the-jci.org
Journal of Clinical Investigation

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Nature Communications
Genetic variant protects some Latina women from breast cancer
An international research collaboration led by UC San Francisco researchers has identified a genetic variant common in Latina women that protects against breast cancer.
National Cancer Institute

Contact: Pete Farley
peter.farley@ucsf.edu
415-502-6397
University of California - San Francisco

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Journal of Behavior Therapy and Experimental Psychiatry
Something in the way we move
New research out of Queen's University offers a new approach to do just that. Nikolaus Troje along with clinical psychologists from the University of Hildesheim, Germany, have shown that walking in a happy or sad style actually affects our mood.

Contact: Anne Craig
anne.craig@queensu.ca
613-533-2877
Queen's University

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Journal of Cell Biology
Over-organizing repair cells set the stage for fibrosis
The excessive activity of repair cells in the early stages of tissue recovery sets the stage for fibrosis by priming the activation of an important growth factor.
Canadian Institutes of Health Research, Collaborative Health Research Program, Canada Foundation for Innovation and Ontario Research Fund, Heart and Stroke Foundation Ontario, European Union's Seventh Framework Program

Contact: Rita Sullivan King
news@rupress.org
212-327-8603
Rockefeller University Press

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Alzheimer's & Dementia
Scientists say national Alzheimer's plan milestones must be strengthened to meet goal by 2025
A workgroup of nearly 40 Alzheimer's researchers and scientists says the research milestones in the US Government's National Plan to Address Alzheimer's Disease must be broadened in scope, increased in scale, and adequately funded in order to successfully achieve this goal. A series of proposals by the workgroup to enlarge and strengthen the Plan are published today in Alzheimer's & Dementia: the Journal of the Alzheimer's Association.

Contact: Alzheimer's Association
media@alz.org
312-335-4078
Alzheimer's Association

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
JAMA Pediatrics
Analysis examines genetic obesity susceptibility, association with body size in kids
A review of medical literature appears to confirm an association between genetic obesity susceptibility and postnatal gains in infant weight and length, as well as showing associations with both fat mass and lean mass in infancy and early childhood.

Contact: Ken K. Ong
ken.ong@mrc-epid.cam.ac.uk
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
JAMA Neurology
No long-term association found between vaccines, multiple sclerosis
Bottom Line: A study to determine whether vaccines, particularly those for hepatitis B and human papillomavirus, increased the risk of multiple sclerosis or other acquired central nervous system demyelinating syndromes found no long-term association of vaccines with disease and a short-term increased risk in younger patients was likely resulted from existing disease.

Contact: Sandra Hernandez-Millett
sandra.d.hernandez-millett@kp.org
626-405-5384
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Measurement Science and Technology
Measuring on ice: Researchers create 'smart' ice skating blade
An ice skating blade that informs figure skaters of the stresses they are imposing on their joints has been developed by a group of researchers in the US.

Contact: Michael Bishop
michael.bishop@iop.org
01-179-301-032
Institute of Physics

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
AAO 2014
3-D printed facial prosthesis offers new hope for eye cancer patients following surgery
Researchers have developed a fast and inexpensive way to make facial prostheses for eye cancer patients using facial scanning software and 3-D printing, according to findings released today at AAO 2014, the 118th annual meeting of the American Academy of Ophthalmology.

Contact: Media Relations
media@aao.org
American Academy of Ophthalmology

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
118th Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Ophthalmology
iPads detect early signs of glaucoma in Nepal eye screening
Using a tablet screening app could prove to be an effective method to aid in the effort to reduce the incidence of avoidable blindness in populations at high-risk for glaucoma with limited access to health care, according to a study released today at AAO 2014, the 118th annual meeting of the American Academy of Ophthalmology.

Contact: Media Relations
media@aao.org
American Academy of Ophthalmology

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
JAMA Internal Medicine
Cigarette purchases, accompany prescription refills at pharmacies
Patients using medication to treat asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, high blood pressure and using oral contraceptives often purchased cigarettes while filling prescriptions at pharmacies.

Contact: Elaine St. Peter
estpeter@partners.org
617-525-6375
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
JAMA Internal Medicine
Gambling, hypersexuality, compulsive shopping associated with dopamine agonist drugs
During a 10-year period, there were 1,580 adverse drug events reported in the United States and 21 other countries that indicated impulse control disorders in patients, including 628 cases of pathological gambling, 465 cases of hypersexuality and 202 cases of compulsive shopping. The total included 710 events associated with dopamine receptor agonist drugs (used to treat Parkinson disease, restless leg syndrome and hyperprolactinemia) and 870 events for other drugs.

Contact: Renee Brehio
rbrehio@ismp.org
614-376-0212
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Annals of Internal Medicine
Changing how primary-care doctors treat pain, fatigue and other common symptoms
Common symptoms such as pain or fatigue account for over half of all doctor's office appointments in the United States, translating into more than 400 million visits annually. A new study from the Regenstrief Institute and Indiana University School of Medicine reports that one in three common symptoms do not have a clear-cut disease-based explanation.

Contact: Cindy Fox Aisen
caisen@iupui.edu
317-843-2276
Indiana University

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Arthritis & Rheumatology
Mummy remains refute antiquity of ankylosing spondylitis
Ankylosing spondylitis is a systemic disease that causes inflammation in the spinal joints and was thought to have affected members of the ancient Egyptian royal families. Now a new study published in Arthritis & Rheumatology, a journal of the American College of Rheumatology, refutes that claim, finding instead a degenerative spinal condition called diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis in royal Egyptian mummies from the 18th to early 20th Dynasties.

Contact: Dawn Peters
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
781-388-8408
Wiley

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Tobacco Control
Non-smokers exposed to 3 times above safe levels of particles when living with smokers
Non-smokers who live in a house with smokers are exposed to three times the officially recommend safe levels of damaging air particles, according to a study published online in the journal Tobacco Control.

Contact: Emma Dickinson
edickinson@bmj.com
44-020-738-36529
BMJ-British Medical Journal

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Thorax
Exposure to traffic pollution during pregnancy can damage future child's lungs
Women who are exposed to traffic pollution while pregnant are increasing the chances of damaging the lungs of their unborn children, concludes a study published online in the journal Thorax.

Contact: Emma Dickinson
edickinson@bmj.com
44-020-738-36529
BMJ-British Medical Journal

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Annals of Internal Medicine
One in 5 physicians unaware their patients have central venous catheters
Attending physicians and hospitalists in general medicine were twice as likely to be unaware of the device's presence compared to interns and residents.

Contact: Beata Mostafavi
bmostafa@umich.edu
734-764-2220
University of Michigan Health System

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Pediatrics
Study shows medication is frequently, unintentionally given incorrectly to young children
According to Nationwide Children's Hospital researchers, 63,000 children under the age of six experienced out-of-hospital medication errors annually between 2002 and 2012. One child is affected every eight minutes, usually by a well-meaning parent or caregiver unintentionally committing a medication error.

Contact: Gina Bericchia
MediaRelations@NationwideChildrens.org
614-355-0495
Nationwide Children's Hospital

Showing releases 376-400 out of 446.

<< < 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 > >>