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Showing releases 376-400 out of 489.

<< < 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 > >>

Public Release: 12-Sep-2014
Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology
Getting hot and wet in Vermont
A fundamental challenge of climate change forecasting is how to bridge the gap between global-scale models and local impacts. A new study -- the first-of-its kind for the Lake Champlain region -- bridges this gap and forecasts that northern Vermont and southern Quebec by 2100 will get eight degrees Fahrenheit hotter; Burlington, Vt., will experience 10 more days in July above 90; and ski resorts will see 50 percent less snowfall.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Joshua Brown
joshua.e.brown@uvm.edu
802-656-3039
University of Vermont

Public Release: 12-Sep-2014
Science
How evolutionary principles could help save our world
The age of the Anthropocene -- the scientific name given to our current geologic age -- is dominated by human impacts on our environment. A warming climate. Increased resistance of pathogens and pests. A swelling population. Coping with these modern global challenges requires application of what one might call a more-ancient principle: evolution.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Jessica Arriens
jarriens@nsf.gov
703-292-2243
National Science Foundation

Public Release: 12-Sep-2014
Journal of Marriage and Family
A wife's happiness is more crucial than her husband's in keeping marriage on track
When it comes to a happy marriage, a new Rutgers study finds that the more content the wife is with the long-term union, the happier the husband is with his life no matter how he feels about the nuptials.

Contact: Robin Lally
rlally@ucm.rutgers.edu
848-932-0557
Rutgers University

Public Release: 12-Sep-2014
Tropical Storm Odile expected to 'eat' Tropical Depression 16E
An infrared picture of Tropical Depression 16E from NOAA's GOES-West satellite shows the tiny storm dwarfed by nearby Tropical Storm Odile. Odile is expected to draw the depression into its circulation and 'eat' it in the next few days.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 12-Sep-2014
NASA-NOAA Suomi NPP sees formation of Tropical Storm Edouard
The sixth tropical depression of the Atlantic Ocean hurricane season formed in the central Atlantic Ocean yesterday, and today, Sept. 12, it strengthened into Tropical Storm Edouard. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite flew over Edouard and provided forecasters with an infrared view of what's happening within the strengthening storm.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 12-Sep-2014
Annual Review of Fluid Mechanics
Fluid mechanics suggests alternative to quantum orthodoxy
MIT researchers find new math explains dynamics of fluid systems that mimic many peculiarities of quantum mechanics.

Contact: Sarah McDonnell
s_mcd@mit.edu
617-253-8923
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 12-Sep-2014
Nature
CCNY analysis explains rich bird biodiversity in Neotropics
Applying analyses designed by City College of New York biologist Mike Hickerson, a team of international researchers is challenging a commonly held view that explains how so many species of birds ended up in the Neotropics, an area rich in rain forest extending from Mexico to the southernmost tip of South America. It is home to the most bird species on Earth.

Contact: Jay Mwamba
jmwamba@ccny.cuny.edu
212-650-7580
City College of New York

Public Release: 12-Sep-2014
Tropical Storm Odile taken on by 2 NASA satellites
As Tropical Storm Odile continues to affect Mexico's west coast and stir up dangerous surf, NASA's TRMM and Aqua satellites provided forecasters information on clouds and rainfall in the coast-hugging storm. On Sept. 12, a Tropical Storm Watch remained in effect from Manzanillo to Cabo Corrientes, Mexico.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 12-Sep-2014
Nature Biotechnology
Worldwide study demonstrates accuracy of genetic analyses
Physicians envision a future in which genomic data from patients is heavily used to manage care -- but experts have questioned the accuracy and reliability of these analyses. Now, a study by 150 researchers in 12 countries finds real strength and agreement across RNA genomic sequencing techniques and laboratories -- as well as ways to improve what little variability exists to set a new high standard.
US Food and Drug Administration

Contact: Kevin Punsky
punsky.kevin@mayo.edu
904-953-0746
Mayo Clinic

Public Release: 12-Sep-2014
NASA sees Tropical Storm Kalmaegi swirl toward the Philippines
Tropical Depression 15W intensified during the early morning hours of Sept. 12 and became a tropical storm re-named 'Kalmaegi.' NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead as the storm intensified.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 12-Sep-2014
Science
Experts call for massive global response to tackle Ebola
The current Ebola outbreak now requires a 'rapid response at a massive global scale,' according to experts at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine.

Contact: Katie Steels
press@lshtm.ac.uk
44-020-792-92802
London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine

Public Release: 12-Sep-2014
Nature Communications
The shadow of a disease
A biosensor for the scattered light of individual unmarked biomolecules such as proteins and tumor markers may facilitate medical diagnosis. The biodetector, that a team led by V. Sandoghdar has developed at the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light, uses the interferometric method iSCAT.

Contact: Vahid Sandoghdar
vahid.sandoghdar@mpl.mpg.de
49-091-316-877-200
Max-Planck-Gesellschaft

Public Release: 12-Sep-2014
PLOS Genetics
Corn spots: Study finds important genes in defense response
What gives corn its spots? NC State researchers scour corn genome to find candidate genes that control an important defense response.
US Department of Agriculture, National Science Foundation

Contact: Dr. Peter Balint-Kurti
pjbalint@ncsu.edu
919-515-3516
North Carolina State University

Public Release: 12-Sep-2014
The American Society for Bone and Mineral Research 2014 Annual Meeting Sept.12-15 in Houston.
Protein appears to protect against bone loss in arthritis
A small protein named GILZ appears to protect against the bone loss that often accompanies arthritis and its treatment, researchers report.

Contact: Toni Baker
tbaker@gru.edu
706-721-4421
Medical College of Georgia at Georgia Regents University

Public Release: 12-Sep-2014
EMBO Molecular Medicine
Dendritic cells affect onset and progress of psoriasis
Different types of dendritic cells in human skin have assorted functions in the early and more advanced stages of psoriasis report researchers in the journal EMBO Molecular Medicine. The scientists suggest that new strategies to regulate the composition of dendritic cells in psoriatic skin lesions might represent an approach for the future treatment of the disease.

Contact: Barry Whyte
barry.whyte@embo.org
EMBO

Public Release: 12-Sep-2014
Parasite Immunology
Piglet health
Parasitologists from the University of Veterinary Medicine of Vienna are closer to understanding the disease process behind porcine neonatal coccidiosis. The disease affects piglets during the first days of their life and can cause heavy diarrhea in the animals. The parasite Cystoisospora suis damages the intestinal mucosa to such a degree that it threatens the growth and survival of the pigs. The researchers have now analyzed the immune response to the infection. The results were published in the journal Parasite Immunology.

Contact: Dr. Simone Gabner
simone.gabner@vetmeduni.ac.at
43-125-077-3402
University of Veterinary Medicine -- Vienna

Public Release: 12-Sep-2014
Physical Review Letters
Moving silicon atoms in graphene with atomic precision
In recent years, it has become possible to see directly individual atoms using electron microscopy -- especially in graphene, the one-atom-thick sheet of carbon. An international collaboration between the University of Vienna and research teams from the UK and the US has shown how an electron beam can move silicon atoms through the graphene lattice without causing damage. The research combines advanced electron microscopy with demanding computer simulations and is published in the premier physics journal Physical Review Letters.

Contact: Dr. Toma Susi
toma.susi@univie.ac.at
43-664-527-3054
University of Vienna

Public Release: 12-Sep-2014
Biophysical Reviews and Letters
Conjecture on the lateral growth of Type I collagen fibrils
Research building on recent model using the algorithm of phyllotaxis to build a dense organization of triple helices in fibrils with circular symmetry.

Contact: Philly Lim
mllim@wspc.com
656-466-5775
World Scientific

Public Release: 12-Sep-2014
International Journal of Modern Physics A
Extension of standard model by knot algebra
This paper makes a connection between the quantum group Slq(2),which describes knots,and the elementary particles of the standard model.

Contact: Philly Lim
mllim@wspc.com
656-466-5775
World Scientific

Public Release: 12-Sep-2014
Modern Physics Letters B
New family of materials for energy-efficient information storage and processing
Hexagonal rare earth ferrites have been demonstrated to exhibit both spontaneous electric and magnetic dipole moments (as a rare case), which may enable couplings of the static electric and magnetic fields in these materials, suggesting application in energy-efficient information storage and processing.
Nebraska EPSCoR

Contact: Philly Lim
mllim@wspc.com
656-466-5775
World Scientific

Public Release: 12-Sep-2014
Science
From worm muscle to spinal discs
Thoughts of the family tree may not be uppermost in the mind of a person suffering from a slipped disc, but those spinal discs provide a window into our evolutionary past. They are remnants of the first vertebrate skeleton, whose origins now appear to be older than had been assumed. Scientists at EMBL Heidelberg have found that, unexpectedly, this skeleton most likely evolved from a muscle.

Contact: Sonia Furtado Neves
sonia.furtado@embl.de
European Molecular Biology Laboratory

Public Release: 12-Sep-2014
International Journal of Information Technology, Communications and Convergence
Cutting the cloud computing carbon cost
Writing in the International Journal of Information Technology, Communications and Convergence, researchers at the University of Oran in Algeria, have investigated how cloud computing systems might be optimized for energy use and to reduce their carbon footprint.

Contact: Albert Ang
press@inderscience.com
Inderscience Publishers

Public Release: 12-Sep-2014
Journal of Neuroscience
Gray matter matters when measuring our tolerance of risk
The gray matter volume of a region in the right posterior parietal cortex is significantly predictive of individual risk attitudes, new research has found.

Contact: Luke O'Neill
luke.oneill@sydney.edu.au
61-291-141-961
University of Sydney

Public Release: 12-Sep-2014
PLOS ONE
Study solves the bluetongue disease 'overwintering' mystery
Veterinary researchers monitoring a Northern California dairy farm discovered how the bluetongue virus survives the cold winter months by hiding out in the tiny biting midge that transmits the virus.
US Department of Agriculture - National Institute of Food and Agriculture, UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine

Contact: Patricia Bailey
pjbailey@ucdavis.edu
530-752-9843
University of California - Davis

Public Release: 12-Sep-2014
Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine
Sleep disorders widely undiagnosed in individuals with multiple sclerosis
In what may be the largest study of sleep problems among individuals with multiple sclerosis, researchers at UC Davis have found that widely undiagnosed sleep disorders may be at the root of the most common and disabling symptom of the disease: fatigue.
NIH/National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Phyllis Brown
phyllis.brown@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu
916-734-9023
University of California - Davis Health System

Showing releases 376-400 out of 489.

<< < 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 > >>