Choose Help The Kavli Prize

EurekAlert!, a service of AAAS
Home About us
Advanced Search
26-Jul-2014 03:13
US Eastern Time

Username:

Password:

Register

Forgot Password?

Press Releases

Breaking News

Science Business

Grants, Awards, Books

Meetings

Multimedia

Science Agencies
on EurekAlert!

US Department of Energy

US National Institutes of Health

US National Science Foundation

Calendar

Submit a Calendar Item

Subscribe/Sponsor

Links & Resources

Portals

RSS Feeds

Accessibility Option On

Breaking News
US Department of Energy
US National Institutes of Health
US National Science Foundation


Arabic

Breaking News

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 376-400 out of 457.

<< < 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 > >>

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
PLOS ONE
Try, try again? Study says no
MIT neuroscientists find that trying harder makes it more difficult to learn some aspects of language.
NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Science Foundation

Contact: Sarah McDonnell
s_mcd@mit.edu
617-253-8923
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
Fires in Indonesia, July 2014
Terra and Aqua satellites detected 154 hotspots in areas across Riau province on Sunday, July 20, indicating forest and land fires had increased again following a decline in rainfall.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
Journal of Virology
Potential new flu drugs target immune response, not virus
The seriousness of disease often results from the strength of immune response, rather than with the virus, itself. Turning down that response, rather than attacking the virus, might be a better way to reduce that severity, says Juliet Morrison of the University of Washington, Seattle. She and her collaborators have now taken the first step in doing just that for the H7N9 influenza, and their work has already led to identification of six potential therapeutics.

Contact: Jim Sliwa
jsliwa@asmusa.org
202-942-9297
American Society for Microbiology

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
Pediatrics
Mothers of children with autism benefit from peer-led intervention
Peer-led interventions that target parental well-being can significantly reduce stress, depression and anxiety in mothers of children with disabilities, according to new findings released today in the journal Pediatrics.
NIH/National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Contact: Jennifer Wetzel
Jennifer.Wetzel@vanderbilt.edu
615-322-4747
Vanderbilt University Medical Center

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
OMICS: A Journal of Integrative Biology
New research from Africa on pharmacomicrobiomics
The Human Microbiome Project is a global initiative to identify and characterize the microorganisms present at multiple sites in the human body.

Contact: Kathryn Ruehle
kruehle@liebertpub.com
914-740-2100
Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
Tropical Storm Wali no more, but remnants soaked Hawaii
On July 19, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Central Pacific Hurricane Center noted that Wali didn't even make it to the Big Island, but moisture associated with the storm did. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's GOES-West satellite captured an image of the remnant low southwest of the Big Island, and a moisture stream that extended over it.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
Nature Communications
Another advancement in imaging from INRS professor François Légaré's team
François Légaré's team at the Institut national de la recherche scientifique's Énergie Matériaux Télécommunications Research Centre successfully imaged a chemical reaction with a spatial and temporal resolution greatly exceeding that obtained to date using microscopes. The team used a femtosecond laser source to shoot a molecular movie of how an acetylene molecule turns into vinylidene. An article presenting the advancement was recently published in the scientific journal Nature Communications.
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, Fonds de recherche du Quebec, Nature et technologies, Canadian Institute for Photonic Innovations

Contact: Gisèle Bolduc
gisele.bolduc@adm.inrs.ca
418-654-2501
INRS

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
Depression and Anxiety
Mental health issues in children with relatives who participated in manhunt after Boston Marathon
Children with relatives who were called upon to participate in the interagency manhunt following the Boston Marathon attack carried a particularly heavy mental health burden, according to a Depression and Anxiety study that included surveys of Boston-area parents and other caretakers.

Contact: Nicole Weingartner
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
201-748-5808
Wiley

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
Nature Communications
More than glitter
A new study from MIT materials scientists reveals that these nanoparticles enter cells by taking advantage of a route normally used in vesicle-vesicle fusion, a crucial process that allows signal transmission between neurons. In the July 21 issue of Nature Communications, the researchers describe in detail the mechanism by which these nanoparticles are able to fuse with a membrane.
National Science Foundation, Swiss National Foundation

Contact: Sarah McDonnell
s_mcd@mit.edu
617-253-8923
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
Cost of World Cup may be too high for Brazil
Brazil's World Cup has been estimated to be the priciest of any yet, with a projected cost of $11.5 billion. Some predictions even claim that the Brazilian government will have spent up to $14 billion on building and renovating 12 stadiums; upgrading federal, state and city infrastructure; and ensuring security.

Contact: Nicole Weingartner
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
201-748-5808
Wiley

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry
Mammals metabolize some pesticides to limit their biomagnification
The concentrations of many historically used, and now widely banned, pesticides and other toxic chemicals -- called legacy contaminants -- can become magnified in an animal that eats contaminated food; however, a new Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry study has found that Arctic mammals metabolize some currently used pesticides, preventing such 'biomagnification.'

Contact: Nicole Weingartner
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
201-748-5808
Wiley

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
Ecology Letters
Study provides insights into birds' migration routes
By tracking hybrids between songbird species, investigators have found that migration routes are under genetic control and could be preventing interbreeding. The research, which is published in Ecology Letters, was conducted using geolocators that, like GPS, record the position of a bird and allow its long distance movement to be tracked.

Contact: Nicole Weingartner
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
201-748-5808
Wiley

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
Journal of Neuroscience
New research links bad diet to loss of smell
Could stuffing yourself full of high-fat foods cause you to lose your sense of smell? A new study from Florida State University neuroscientists says so, and it has researchers taking a closer look at how our diets could impact a whole range of human functions that were not traditionally considered when examining the impact of obesity.

Contact: Kathleen Haughney
khaughney@fsu.edu
850-644-1489
Florida State University

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
Geophysical Research Letters
Examining the causes of a devastating debris flow
Storm-triggered landslides cause loss of life, property damage, and landscape alterations. For instance, the remnants of Hurricane Camille in 1969 caused 109 deaths in central Virginia, after 600 mm of rain fell in mountainous terrain in 6 hours. More recently, on 8 August 2010, a rainstorm-induced landslide devastated the Chinese county of Zhouqu, causing more than 1,000 deaths. A new modeling study by Ren examines the multiple factors, both natural and human caused, that came together to produce this event.

Contact: Nicole Weingartner
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
201-748-5808
Wiley

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
Energy Science and Engineering
Replacing coal and oil with natural gas will not help fight global warming
Both shale gas and conventional natural gas have a larger greenhouse gas footprint than do coal or oil, especially for the primary uses of residential and commercial heating.

Contact: Nicole Weingartner
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
201-748-5808
Wiley

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
Current Protocols in Microbiology
Researchers simplify process to purify water using seed extracts
Researchers have streamlined and simplified a process that uses extracts from seeds of Moringa oleifa trees to purify water, reducing levels of harmful bacteria by 90 percent to 99 percent. The hardy trees that are drought resistant are cultivated widely throughout many countries of Africa, Asia, and Latin America.

Contact: Nicole Weingartner
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
201-748-5808
Wiley

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
Nature
Largest gene discovery 'kick-starts' new search for schizophrenia treatments
The discovery of over a hundred genetic risk factors linked to schizophrenia provides vital new clues in understanding what causes the condition and will kick-start the search for new treatments, according to leading British scientists. In the biggest molecular genetic study of schizophrenia ever conducted, the Psychiatric Genetics Consortium, led by professor Michael O'Donovan from Cardiff University's MRC Centre for Neuropsychiatric Genetics and Genomics, combined all available schizophrenia samples into a new, single systematic analysis.
Medical Research Council

Contact: Heath Jeffries
JeffriesHV1@cardiff.ac.uk
029-208-70917
Cardiff University

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
Nature
Vanderbilt discovery may advance colorectal cancer diagnosis and treatment
A Vanderbilt University-led research team has identified protein 'signatures' of genetic mutations that drive colorectal cancer, the nation's second leading cause of cancer deaths after lung cancer.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Craig Boerner
craig.boerner@vanderbilt.edu
615-322-4747
Vanderbilt University Medical Center

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
JAMA Ophthalmology
Iodine may alleviate swelling in retinitis pigmentosa patients' retinas
Researchers from the Massachusetts Eye and Ear, Harvard Medical School, and Boston University School of Medicine tested whether the extent of retinal swelling due to cystoid macular edema was inversely related to dietary iodine intake in patients with retinitis pigmentosa and found that it was. This finding raises the possibility that an iodine supplement could help limit or reduce central foveal swelling in retinitis pigmentosa patients with cystoid macular edema.
NIH/National Eye Institute, Massachusetts Lions Eye Research Fund, Inc., Foundation Fighting Blindness

Contact: Mary Leach
Mary_Leach@meei.harvard.edu
Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
Annals of Neurology
Diagnostic criteria for Christianson syndrome
A new study provides the most definitive characterization of the autism-like intellectual disability disorder Christianson syndrome and provides the first diagnostic criteria to help doctors and families identify and understand the condition. Initial evidence suggests CS could affect tens of thousands of boys worldwide.
Simons Foundation, Nancy Lurie Marks Foundation, Christianson Syndrome Association

Contact: David Orenstein
david_orenstein@brown.edu
401-863-1862
Brown University

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
Psychological Science
Missing sleep may hurt your memory
Lack of sleep, already considered a public health epidemic, can also lead to errors in memory, finds a new study by researchers at Michigan State University and the University of California, Irvine.

Contact: Andy Henion
henion@msu.edu
517-355-3294
Michigan State University

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
Ophthalmology
Nearsightedness increases with level of education and longer schooling
Education and behavior have a greater impact on the development of nearsightedness than do genetic factors: with each school year completed, a person becomes more nearsighted.

Contact: Dr. Alireza Mirshahi
alireza.mirshahi@unimedizin-mainz.de
49-613-117-7085
Johannes Gutenberg Universitaet Mainz

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
The real price of steak
New research reveals the comparative environmental costs of livestock-based foods.

Contact: Yivsam Azgad
news@weizmann.ac.il
972-893-43852
Weizmann Institute of Science

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
European Physical Journal E
Refined biological evolution model
Models for the evolution of life try and clarify the long term dynamics of an evolving system of species. A recent model accounts for species interactions with various degrees of symmetry, connectivity, and species abundance. This is an improvement on previous, simpler models, which apply random fitness levels to species. The findings published in the European Physical Journal E demonstrate that the resulting replicator ecosystems do not appear to be a self-organized critical model, unlike the so-called Bak Sneppen model.

Contact: Laura Zimmermann
laura.zimmermann@springer.com
49-622-148-78414
Springer

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
HortScience
Filter bed substrates, plant types recommended for rain gardens
Researchers analyzed the effectiveness of three different filter bed substrates to support plant growth and remove nutrients from urban stormwater runoff. Twelve rain gardens containing 16 plant species were evaluated in the study. All three substrates reduced the quantity of pollutants in urban stormwater runoff. Substrates did not affect shoot or root growth of plants. Eleven of the species used grew well in the rain gardens and are recommended as rain garden plants.

Contact: Michael W. Neff
mwneff@ashs.org
703-836-4606
American Society for Horticultural Science

Showing releases 376-400 out of 457.

<< < 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 > >>