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Showing releases 426-450 out of 457.

<< < 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 > >>

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
The Lancet
Deaths and infections from HIV, tuberculosis, and malaria plummet globally
Today, fewer people are dying from HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, and malaria, according to a new, first-of-its-kind analysis of trend data from 188 countries. The pace of decline in deaths and infections has accelerated since 2000, when the Millennium Development Goals were established to stop the spread of these diseases by 2015.

Contact: Rhonda Stewart
stewartr@uw.edu
206-897-2863
Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
AIDS 2014
Lancet
The Lancet: Most comprehensive study to date shows success of the Millennium
A major new analysis from the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013 published in The Lancet, shows that accelerated progress against the global burden of HIV, malaria, and tuberculosis (TB) has been made since 2000 when governments worldwide adopted Millennium Development Goal 6 to combat HIV/AIDS, malaria, and TB.

Contact: Rhonda Stewart
stewartr@uw.edu
206-897-2863
The Lancet

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Temple University researchers eliminate the HIV virus from cultured human cells for first time
The HIV-1 virus has proved to be tenacious, inserting its genome permanently into its victims' DNA, forcing patients to take a lifelong drug regimen to control the virus and prevent a fresh attack. Now, a team of Temple University School of Medicine researchers has designed a way to snip out the integrated HIV-1 genes for good.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Jeremy Walter
Jeremy.Walter@tuhs.temple.edu
267-838-0398
Temple University Health System

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
Canadian Medical Association Journal
Advanced cancer patients can benefit from programs combining exercise, nutrition
Patients with advanced cancer can benefit from a rehabilitation program combining exercise, nutritional counselling and symptom control, according to an evidence review in the Canadian Medical Association Journal. Palliative care programs should be expanded to include these elements and should be available to patients from diagnosis.

Contact: Kim Barnhardt
kim.barnhardt@cmaj.ca
613-520-7116 x2224
Canadian Medical Association Journal

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
Canadian Medical Association Journal
Previous stroke, vascular disease: Seniors at higher risk of stroke after heart surgery
Older people who have had strokes or who have vascular disease are at risk of stroke both immediately after cardiac surgery and during the following two years, according to a new study in the Canadian Medical Association Journal.

Contact: Kim Barnhardt
kim.barnhardt@cmaj.ca
613-520-7116 x2224
Canadian Medical Association Journal

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Parenting skills tied to reduced inflammation in low-income children
A new Northwestern University study suggests that an intervention focused on strengthening families can reduce inflammation, a chronic over activation of parts of the immune system that is important for long-term health. Children of low socioeconomic status often experience such inflammation and poorer health at all stages of life than their more advantaged peers -- from lower birth weights at infancy to higher rates of age-related cardiovascular disease and cancer.

Contact: Hilary Hurd Anyaso
h-anyaso@northwestern.edu
847-491-4887
Northwestern University

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
Journal of Experimental Medicine
Healing the heart with fat
A diet enriched in 18-HEPE might help prevent heart failure in patients with cardiovascular diseases, according to researchers from Japan.

Contact: Rita Sullivan King
news@rupress.org
212-327-8603
Rockefeller University Press

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
Hypertension: Journal of the American Heart Association
Eating probiotics regularly may improve your blood pressure
Probiotics -- a bacteria in yogurt and supplements -- appear to modestly lower blood pressure, according to a review of nine studies. The blood pressure-lowering effect from probiotics was greatest among people with elevated blood pressure. Additional studies are needed before doctors can confidently recommend probiotics for high blood pressure control and prevention.

Contact: Karen Astle
karen.astle@heart.org
214-706-1392
American Heart Association

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
Journal of Experimental Medicine
Study links enzyme to Alzheimer's disease
Unclogging the body's protein disposal system may improve memory in patients with Alzheimer's disease, according to researchers in Korea.
National Research Foundation of Korea

Contact: Rita Sullivan King
news@rupress.org
212-327-8603
Rockefeller University Press

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
Annals of Internal Medicine
Annals of Internal Medicine tip sheet for July 22, 2014
The July 22 issue of Annals of Internal Medicine contains articles titled 'National Quality Forum cautions hospital performance measures must adjust for patient sociodemographic status or risk widening the care gap' and 'Long-term remission of HIV returns after patients stop antiretroviral treatment.'

Contact: Megan Hanks
mhanks@acponline.org
215-351-2656
American College of Physicians

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
Current Biology
Seals forage at offshore wind farms
By using sophisticated GPS tracking to monitor seals' every movement, researchers have shown for the first time that some individuals are repeatedly drawn to offshore wind farms and pipelines. Those man-made structures probably serve as artificial reefs and attractive hunting grounds, according to a study published in the Cell Press journal Current Biology on July 21.

Contact: Mary Beth O'Leary
moleary@cell.com
617-397-2802
Cell Press

Public Release: 20-Jul-2014
Nature
Mysterious dance of dwarfs may force a cosmic rethink
The discovery that many small galaxies throughout the universe do not 'swarm' around larger ones like bees do but 'dance' in orderly disc-shaped orbits is a challenge to our understanding of how the universe formed and evolved. The finding, by an international team of astronomers, including professor Geraint Lewis from the University of Sydney's School of Physics, has just been announced in Nature.

Contact: Verity Leatherdale
verity.leatherdale@sydney.edu.au
61-293-514-312
University of Sydney

Public Release: 20-Jul-2014
Nature
Size and age of plants impact their productivity more than climate, study shows
The size and age of plants has more of an impact on their productivity than temperature and precipitation, according to a landmark study by University of Arizona professor Brian Enquist and postdoctoral researcher Sean Michaletz. They show that variation in terrestrial ecosystems is characterized by a common mathematical relationship but that climate plays a relatively minor direct role. The results have important implications for models used to predict climate change effects on ecosystem function and worldwide food production.
National Science Foundation, Aspen Center for Environmental Studies, National Natural Science Foundation of China, Fujian Natural Science Fund for Distinguished Young Scholars

Contact: Shelley Littin
littin@email.arizona.edu
319-541-1482
University of Arizona

Public Release: 20-Jul-2014
Nature Nanotechnology
Tiny laser sensor heightens bomb detection sensitivity
UC Berkeley researchers have created a plasmon laser detector that can sniff out tiny traces of airborne molecules of explosives. The sensor detected both DNT and ammonium nitrate at concentrations below one part per billion.
Air Force Office of Scientific Research

Contact: Sarah Yang
scyang@berkeley.edu
510-643-7741
University of California - Berkeley

Public Release: 20-Jul-2014
Nature Genetics
Common gene variants account for most of the genetic risk for autism
Nearly 60 percent of the risk of developing autism is genetic and most of that risk is caused by inherited variant genes that are common in the population and present in individuals without the disorder, according to a study led by researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published in the July 20 edition of Nature Genetics.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Elizabeth Dowling
newsmedia@mssm.edu
212-241-9200
The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine

Public Release: 20-Jul-2014
Nature Climate Change
CU, Old Dominion team finds sea level rise in western tropical Pacific anthropogenic
A new study led by Old Dominion University and the University of Colorado Boulder indicates sea levels likely will continue to rise in the tropical Pacific Ocean off the coasts of the Philippines and northeastern Australia as humans continue to alter the climate.
NASA, National Science Foundation

Contact: Robert Leben
robert.leben@colorado.edu
303-492-4113
University of Colorado at Boulder

Public Release: 20-Jul-2014
Nature Methods
New technique maps life's effects on our DNA
Researchers at the BBSRC-funded Babraham Institute, in collaboration with the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute Single Cell Genomics Centre, have developed a powerful new single-cell technique to help investigate how the environment affects our development and the traits we inherit from our parents.
Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council

Contact: Rob Dawson
rob.dawson@bbsrc.ac.uk
07-557-487-865
Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council

Public Release: 20-Jul-2014
Nature Geoscience
Mixing it up: Study provides new insight into Southern Ocean behavior
A new study has found that turbulent mixing in the deep waters of the Southern Ocean, which has a profound effect on global ocean circulation and climate, varies with the strength of surface eddies -- the ocean equivalent of storms in the atmosphere -- and possibly also wind speeds.

Contact: Glenn Harris
G.Harris@soton.ac.uk
44-023-805-93212
University of Southampton

Public Release: 20-Jul-2014
Astrobiology
UEA research shows oceans vital for possibility for alien life
Researchers at the University of East Anglia have made an important step in the race to discover whether other planets could develop and sustain life. New research published today in the journal Astrobiology shows the vital role of oceans in moderating climate on Earth-like planets. Until now, computer simulations of habitable climates on Earth-like planets have focused on their atmospheres. But the presence of oceans is vital for optimal climate stability and habitability.
Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council

Contact: Lisa Horton
l.horton@uea.ac.uk
44-016-035-92764
University of East Anglia

Public Release: 20-Jul-2014
Nature Genetics
Singapore scientists discover genetic cause of common breast tumours in women
A multidisciplinary team of scientists from the National Cancer Centre Singapore, Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School Singapore and Singapore General Hospital have made a seminal breakthrough in understanding the molecular basis of fibroadenoma, one of the most common breast tumours diagnosed in women. The team, led by Professors Teh Bin Tean, Patrick Tan, Tan Puay Hoon and Steve Rozen, used advanced DNA sequencing technologies to identify a critical gene called MED12 that was repeatedly disrupted in nearly 60 percent of fibroadenoma cases.
Singapore National Medical Research Council, Singapore Millennium Foundation, Lee Foundation, Tanoto Foundation, National Cancer Centre Singapore, Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School, Cancer Science Institute Singapore, Verdant Foundation

Contact: Lydia Ng
lydia.ng.w.r@singhealth.com.sg
659-271-6175
SingHealth

Public Release: 20-Jul-2014
Nature Materials
New method for extracting radioactive elements from air and water
Scientists at the University of Liverpool have successfully tested a material that can extract atoms of rare or dangerous elements such as radon from the air.
Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council

Contact: Jamie Brown
jamie.brown@liverpool.ac.uk
44-151-794-2248
University of Liverpool

Public Release: 20-Jul-2014
Nature Materials
A noble gas cage
A new material called CC3 effectively traps xenon, krypton, and radon. These gases are used in industries such as lighting or medicine and, in the case of radon, one that can be hazardous when it accumulates in buildings. Research appearing on July 20th in Nature Materials shows how: by breathing enough to let the gases in but not out. The results might lead to cheaper, less energy intensive ways to extract these gases.
Department of Energy, Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council

Contact: Mary Beckman
mary.beckman@pnnl.gov
509-375-3688
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 20-Jul-2014
Ecology Letters
Fecal transplants let packrats eat poison
Woodrats lost their ability to eat toxic creosote bushes after antibiotics killed their gut microbes. Woodrats that never ate the plants were able to do so after receiving fecal transplants with microbes from creosote-eaters, University of Utah biologists found.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Lee J. Siegel
lee.siegel@utah.edu
801-244-5399
University of Utah

Public Release: 20-Jul-2014
Why are more people in the UK complaining about their doctors?
Enquiries made by the general public to the GMC about doctors' fitness to practise rose from 5,168 in 2007 to 10,347 in 2012. In a bid to understand this increase, the GMC commissioned a research team from the Collaboration for the Advancement of Medical Education, Research and Assessment at Plymouth University Peninsula Schools of Medicine and Dentistry to investigate the issues and produce a report.
General Medical Council UK

Contact: Andrew Gould
andrew.gould@plymouth.ac.uk
University of Plymouth

Public Release: 20-Jul-2014
20th International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2014)
JAMA
Study examines incentives to increase medical male circumcision to help reduce risk of HIV
Among uncircumcised men in Kenya, compensation in the form of food vouchers worth approximately US $9 or $15, compared with lesser or no compensation, resulted in a modest increase in the prevalence of circumcision after two months, according to a study published by JAMA.

Contact: David Pesci
dpesci@email.unc.edu
919-962-2600
The JAMA Network Journals

Showing releases 426-450 out of 457.

<< < 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 > >>