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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 426-450 out of 477.

<< < 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 > >>

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Annals of Internal Medicine
Changing how primary-care doctors treat pain, fatigue and other common symptoms
Common symptoms such as pain or fatigue account for over half of all doctor's office appointments in the United States, translating into more than 400 million visits annually. A new study from the Regenstrief Institute and Indiana University School of Medicine reports that one in three common symptoms do not have a clear-cut disease-based explanation.

Contact: Cindy Fox Aisen
caisen@iupui.edu
317-843-2276
Indiana University

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Arthritis & Rheumatology
Mummy remains refute antiquity of ankylosing spondylitis
Ankylosing spondylitis is a systemic disease that causes inflammation in the spinal joints and was thought to have affected members of the ancient Egyptian royal families. Now a new study published in Arthritis & Rheumatology, a journal of the American College of Rheumatology, refutes that claim, finding instead a degenerative spinal condition called diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis in royal Egyptian mummies from the 18th to early 20th Dynasties.

Contact: Dawn Peters
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
781-388-8408
Wiley

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Tobacco Control
Non-smokers exposed to 3 times above safe levels of particles when living with smokers
Non-smokers who live in a house with smokers are exposed to three times the officially recommend safe levels of damaging air particles, according to a study published online in the journal Tobacco Control.

Contact: Emma Dickinson
edickinson@bmj.com
44-020-738-36529
BMJ-British Medical Journal

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Thorax
Exposure to traffic pollution during pregnancy can damage future child's lungs
Women who are exposed to traffic pollution while pregnant are increasing the chances of damaging the lungs of their unborn children, concludes a study published online in the journal Thorax.

Contact: Emma Dickinson
edickinson@bmj.com
44-020-738-36529
BMJ-British Medical Journal

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Annals of Internal Medicine
One in 5 physicians unaware their patients have central venous catheters
Attending physicians and hospitalists in general medicine were twice as likely to be unaware of the device's presence compared to interns and residents.

Contact: Beata Mostafavi
bmostafa@umich.edu
734-764-2220
University of Michigan Health System

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Pediatrics
Study shows medication is frequently, unintentionally given incorrectly to young children
According to Nationwide Children's Hospital researchers, 63,000 children under the age of six experienced out-of-hospital medication errors annually between 2002 and 2012. One child is affected every eight minutes, usually by a well-meaning parent or caregiver unintentionally committing a medication error.

Contact: Gina Bericchia
MediaRelations@NationwideChildrens.org
614-355-0495
Nationwide Children's Hospital

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Antibiotics may help Salmonella spread in infected animals, Stanford scientists learn
Some people infected with pathogens spread their germs to others while remaining symptom-free themselves. Now, investigators at the Stanford University School of Medicine believe they may know why.

Contact: Bruce Goldman
goldmanb@stanford.edu
650-725-2106
Stanford University Medical Center

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Canadian Medical Association Journal
Children who drink non-cow's milk are twice as likely to have low vitamin D
Children who drink non-cow's milk such as rice, almond, soy or goat's milk, have lower levels of vitamin D in their blood than those who drink cow's milk, according to a new study published in the Canadian Medical Association Journal.

Contact: Geoff Koehler
koehlerg@smh.ca
416-864-6060 x6537
St. Michael's Hospital

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association
Seeing doctor twice a year helps keep blood pressure under control
People who visited their doctor at least twice a year had better blood pressure control. Having healthcare insurance and getting treated for high cholesterol also increased the likelihood of controlling blood pressure.
National Institutes of Health, US Army, US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, State of South Carolina

Contact: Maggie Francis
maggie.francis@heart.org
214-706-1382
American Heart Association

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Annals of Internal Medicine
Three-minute assessment successfully identifies delirium in hospitalized elders
Investigators at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center have developed a three-minute diagnostic assessment for delirium and shown it is extremely accurate in identifying the condition in older hospital patients.
NIH/National Institute of Aging

Contact: Bonnie Prescott
bprescot@bidmc.harvard.edu
617-667-7306
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Environmental Science and Technology
New tracers can identify frack fluids in the environment
Duke scientists have developed geochemical tracers to identify hydraulic fracturing flowback fluids that have been spilled or released into the environment. The tracers have been field-tested at two sites and can distinguish fracking fluids from wastewater versus conventional wells or other sources. They give scientists new forensic tools to detect if fracking fluids are escaping into water supplies and what risks, if any, they might pose.
National Science Foundation, Park Foundation

Contact: Tim Lucas
tdlucas@duke.edu
919-613-8084
Duke University

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Acute Cardiovascular Care 2014
Heart rate may predict survival and brain function in comatose cardiac arrest survivors
Patients with sinus bradycardia during therapeutic hypothermia had a 50 to 60 percent lower mortality rate at 180 days than those with no sinus bradycardia. Study also found that sinus bradycardia was directly associated with a better neurological status 180 days after the arrest.

Contact: Jacqueline Partarrieu
press@escardio.org
33-492-947-756
European Society of Cardiology

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Scientists unravel the mystery of a rare sweating disorder
An international research team discovered that mutation of a single gene blocks sweat production, a dangerous condition due to an increased risk of hyperthermia, also known as heatstroke. The gene, ITPR2, controls a basic cellular process in sweat glands, promoting the release of calcium necessary for normal sweat production, and its loss results in impaired sweat secretion.

Contact: Jens Wilkinson
jens.wilkinson@riken.jp
81-048-462-1225
RIKEN

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
American College of Gastroenterology Annual Scientific Meeting 2014
American Journal of Gastroenterology
HCV treatment breakthroughs highlighted at ACG 2014
Promising new research in the area of hepatitis C therapy that suggests more patients, including those with cirrhosis, will be cured from this common cause of potentially fatal viral liver disease; as well as a number of abstracts that advance understanding of the safety and effectiveness of fecal microbiota transplantation for Clostridium difficile, are among the highlights of the American College of Gastroenterology's 79th Annual Scientific Meeting, which will be held this week in Philadelphia.

Contact: Jacqueline Gaulin
jgaulin@gi.org
301-263-9000
American College of Gastroenterology

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Annals of Internal Medicine
For inmates, pricey hepatitis C drug could make financial sense
New, significantly improved hepatitis C drugs have revolutionized how the disease is treated, but they are also expensive. One such drug, sofosbuvir, costs more than $7,000 a week for 12 weeks of treatment.

Contact: Michelle Brandt
mbrandt@stanford.edu
650-723-0272
Stanford University Medical Center

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Annals of Internal Medicine
Annals of Internal Medicine tip sheet for Oct. 21, 2014
This edition includes, 'Three-minute in-office test accurately diagnoses delirium,' 'Physicians often unaware when patients' catheters are left in place,' 'Knowing individual risk does not increase cancer screening rates,' and 'Many common symptoms unrelated to disease,' published in Annals of Internal Medicine.

Contact: Megan Hanks
mhanks@acponline.org
215-351-2656
American College of Physicians

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
American Society of Human Genetics 2014 Annual Meeting
Study finds heart attacks do not have as strong of a genetic link as previously suspected
Heart attacks are not as connected to family history and genetics as may have been previously believed, according to a new study by researchers at the Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute in Salt Lake City.

Contact: Jess C. Gomez
jess.gomez@imail.org
801-507-7455
Intermountain Medical Center

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Molecular Psychiatry
Sport in old age can stimulate brain fitness, but effect decreases with advancing age
Physical exercise in old age can improve brain perfusion as well as certain memory skills. This is the finding of Magdeburg neuroscientists who studied men and women aged between 60 and 77. In younger individuals regular training on a treadmill tended to improve cerebral blood flow and visual memory. However, trial participants who were older than 70 years of age tended to show no benefit of exercise.

Contact: Dr. Marcus Neitzert
marcus.neitzert@dzne.de
49-228-433-02271
DZNE - German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases

Public Release: 19-Oct-2014
Science China: Technological Sciences
Chinese power: Challenges and R&D opportunities of smart distribution grids
Smart grid has been a key development strategy of energy in China. Scientists at Tianjin University in eastern China conducted a nationwide investigation of the current state of power distribution grids and outlined research and development opportunities to modernize power grids.
National Social Science Foundation of China

Contact: Yu Yixin
yixinyu@tju.edu.cn
Science China Press

Public Release: 19-Oct-2014
AAO 2014
Research reveals likelihood, onset of MS diagnosis among patients with inflammatory eye disease
The results of the largest retrospective study of multiple sclerosis in uveitis patients has revealed that nearly 60 percent of patients with both diseases were diagnosed with each within a five-year span.

Contact: Media Relations
media@aao.org
American Academy of Ophthalmology

Public Release: 19-Oct-2014
27th European Congress of Neuropsychopharmacology
Aspirin shown to benefit schizophrenia treatment
A new study shows that some anti-inflammatory medicines, such as aspirin, estrogen, and Fluimucil, can improve the efficacy of existing schizophrenia treatments. This work is being presented at the European College of Neuropsychopharmacology conference in Berlin.
Stanley Medical Research Foundation, Dutch Medical Research Foundation

Contact: Press Officer
press@ecnp.eu
39-349-238-8191
European College of Neuropsychopharmacology

Public Release: 19-Oct-2014
27th European Congress of Neuropsychopharmacology
New research shows fish intake associated with boost to antidepressant response
Up to half of patients who suffer from depression do not respond to treatment with SSRIs. Now a group of Dutch researchers have carried out a study which shows that increasing fatty fish intake appears to increase the response rate in patients who do not respond to antidepressants. This work is being presented at the European College of Neuropsychopharmacology congress in Berlin
Netherlands Organization for Health Research and Development, H.G. Ruhé, Dutch Brain

Contact: Press Officer
press@ecnp.eu
39-349-238-8191
European College of Neuropsychopharmacology

Public Release: 19-Oct-2014
27th European Congress of Neuropsychopharmacology
Panic attacks associated with fear of bright daylight
Fear of bright daylight is associated with panic disorder, according to new presented at the ECNP congress in Berlin.
Italian Ministry of Education, University and Research

Contact: Press Officer
press@ecnp.eu
39-349-238-8191
European College of Neuropsychopharmacology

Public Release: 19-Oct-2014
Nature Medicine
Many older people have mutations linked to leukemia, lymphoma in their blood cells
At least 2 percent of people over age 40 and 5 percent of people over 70 have mutations linked to leukemia and lymphoma in their blood cells, according to new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, NIH/National Human Genome Research Institute

Contact: Caroline Arbanas
arbanasc@wustl.edu
314-286-0109
Washington University School of Medicine

Public Release: 19-Oct-2014
Nature Medicine
New insight that 'mega' cells control the growth of blood-producing cells
While megakaryocytes are best known for producing platelets that heal wounds, these 'mega' cells found in bone marrow also play a critical role in regulating stem cells according to new research from the Stowers Institute for Medical Research. In fact, hematopoietic stem cells differentiate to generate megakaryocytes in bone marrow. The Stowers study is the first to show that hematopoietic stem cells (the parent cells) can be directly controlled by their own progeny (megakaryocytes).
The Stowers Institute for Medical Research

Contact: Kim Bland
ksb@stowers.org
816-926-4015
Stowers Institute for Medical Research

Showing releases 426-450 out of 477.

<< < 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 > >>