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Showing releases 451-457 out of 457.

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Public Release: 20-Jul-2014
Nature Genetics
Common gene variants account for most genetic risk for autism
Most of the genetic risk for autism comes from versions of genes that are common in the population rather than from rare variants or spontaneous glitches. Heritability also outweighed other risk factors in this largest study of its kind to date. About 52 percent of the risk for autism was traced to common and rare inherited variation, with spontaneous mutations contributing a modest 2.6 percent of the total risk.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Jules Asher
NIMHpress@nih.gov
301-443-4536
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Public Release: 20-Jul-2014
Nature Methods
Speedy computation enables scientists to reconstruct an animal's development cell by cell
Recent advances in imaging technology are transforming how scientists see the cellular universe, showing the form and movement of once grainy and blurred structures in stunning detail. But extracting the torrent of information contained in those images often surpasses the limits of existing computational resources. Now, researchers at HHMI's Janelia Research Campus have created a new computational method to rapidly track the three-dimensional movements of cells in such data-rich images.

Contact: Jim Keeley
keeleyj@hhmi.org
301-215-8858
Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Public Release: 20-Jul-2014
Nature Genetics
Marmoset sequence sheds new light on primate biology and evolution
A team of scientists from around the world led by Baylor College of Medicine and Washington University in St. Louis has completed the genome sequence of the common marmoset -- the first sequence of a New World Monkey -- providing new information about the marmoset's unique rapid reproductive system, physiology and growth, shedding new light on primate biology and evolution.

Contact: Glenna Picton
picton@bcm.edu
713-798-7974
Baylor College of Medicine

Public Release: 20-Jul-2014
Nature
Metabolic enzyme stops progression of most common type of kidney cancer
Researchers found that an enzyme called FBP1 -- essential for regulating metabolism -- binds to a transcription factor in the nucleus of certain kidney cells and restrains energy production in the cell body. What's more, they determined that this enzyme is missing from all kidney tumor tissue analyzed. These tumor cells without FBP1 produce energy at a much faster rate than their non-cancer cell counterparts.
Howard Hughes Medical Institute, NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Karen Kreeger
karen.kreeger@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-5658
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 20-Jul-2014
Nature
Scientists map one of most important proteins in life -- and cancer
Scientists reveal the structure of one of the most important and complicated proteins in cell division - a fundamental process in life and the development of cancer -- in research published in Nature today.
Cancer Research UK

Contact: Graham Shaw
graham.shaw@icr.ac.uk
020-715-35380
Cancer Research UK

Public Release: 20-Jul-2014
Nature
New findings show strikingly early seeding of HIV viral reservoir
New research finds that the viral reservoir is established substantially earlier after HIV infection than previously recognized.
US Military Research and Material Command, US Military HIV Research Program, Henry M. Jackson Foundation, National Institutes of Health, Ragon Foundation

Contact: Bonnie Prescott
bprescot@bidmc.harvard.edu
617-667-7306
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

Public Release: 20-Jul-2014
Nature Genetics
Genetic risk for autism stems mostly from common genes
Using new statistical tools, Carnegie Mellon University's Kathryn Roeder has led an international team of researchers to discover that most of the genetic risk for autism comes from versions of genes that are common in the population rather than from rare variants or spontaneous glitches.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Shilo Rea
shilo@cmu.edu
412-268-6094
Carnegie Mellon University

Showing releases 451-457 out of 457.

<< < 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19