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Showing releases 451-470 out of 470.

<< < 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19

Public Release: 19-Oct-2014
AAO 2014
Research reveals likelihood, onset of MS diagnosis among patients with inflammatory eye disease
The results of the largest retrospective study of multiple sclerosis in uveitis patients has revealed that nearly 60 percent of patients with both diseases were diagnosed with each within a five-year span.

Contact: Media Relations
media@aao.org
American Academy of Ophthalmology

Public Release: 19-Oct-2014
27th European Congress of Neuropsychopharmacology
Aspirin shown to benefit schizophrenia treatment
A new study shows that some anti-inflammatory medicines, such as aspirin, estrogen, and Fluimucil, can improve the efficacy of existing schizophrenia treatments. This work is being presented at the European College of Neuropsychopharmacology conference in Berlin.
Stanley Medical Research Foundation, Dutch Medical Research Foundation

Contact: Press Officer
press@ecnp.eu
39-349-238-8191
European College of Neuropsychopharmacology

Public Release: 19-Oct-2014
27th European Congress of Neuropsychopharmacology
New research shows fish intake associated with boost to antidepressant response
Up to half of patients who suffer from depression do not respond to treatment with SSRIs. Now a group of Dutch researchers have carried out a study which shows that increasing fatty fish intake appears to increase the response rate in patients who do not respond to antidepressants. This work is being presented at the European College of Neuropsychopharmacology congress in Berlin
Netherlands Organization for Health Research and Development, H.G. Ruhé, Dutch Brain

Contact: Press Officer
press@ecnp.eu
39-349-238-8191
European College of Neuropsychopharmacology

Public Release: 19-Oct-2014
27th European Congress of Neuropsychopharmacology
Panic attacks associated with fear of bright daylight
Fear of bright daylight is associated with panic disorder, according to new presented at the ECNP congress in Berlin.
Italian Ministry of Education, University and Research

Contact: Press Officer
press@ecnp.eu
39-349-238-8191
European College of Neuropsychopharmacology

Public Release: 19-Oct-2014
Nature Medicine
Many older people have mutations linked to leukemia, lymphoma in their blood cells
At least 2 percent of people over age 40 and 5 percent of people over 70 have mutations linked to leukemia and lymphoma in their blood cells, according to new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, NIH/National Human Genome Research Institute

Contact: Caroline Arbanas
arbanasc@wustl.edu
314-286-0109
Washington University School of Medicine

Public Release: 19-Oct-2014
Nature Medicine
New insight that 'mega' cells control the growth of blood-producing cells
While megakaryocytes are best known for producing platelets that heal wounds, these 'mega' cells found in bone marrow also play a critical role in regulating stem cells according to new research from the Stowers Institute for Medical Research. In fact, hematopoietic stem cells differentiate to generate megakaryocytes in bone marrow. The Stowers study is the first to show that hematopoietic stem cells (the parent cells) can be directly controlled by their own progeny (megakaryocytes).
The Stowers Institute for Medical Research

Contact: Kim Bland
ksb@stowers.org
816-926-4015
Stowers Institute for Medical Research

Public Release: 19-Oct-2014
27th European Congress of Neuropsychopharmacology
I have anxiety, why is my doctor prescribing an antipsychotic?
What's in a name? Doctors have found that the name of the drug you are prescribed significantly influences how the patient sees the treatment. Now in a significant shift, the world's major psychiatry organizations are proposing to completely change the terminology of the drugs used in mental disorders.

Contact: Press Office
press@ecnp.eu
39-349-238-8191
European College of Neuropsychopharmacology

Public Release: 19-Oct-2014
Nature
Major breakthrough could help detoxify pollutants
Scientists at The University of Manchester hope a major breakthrough could lead to more effective methods for detoxifying dangerous pollutants like PCBs and dioxins. The result is a culmination of 15 years of research and has been published in Nature. It details how certain organisms manage to lower the toxicity of pollutants.
European Research Council

Contact: Morwenna Grills
Morwenna.Grills@manchester.ac.uk
44-016-127-52111
University of Manchester

Public Release: 19-Oct-2014
AAO 2014
Tear duct implant effective at reducing pain and inflammation in cataract surgery patients
The first tear duct implant developed to treat inflammation and pain following cataract surgery has been shown to be a reliable alternative to medicated eye drops, which are the current standard of care, according to a study presented today at AAO 2014, the 118th annual meeting of the American Academy of Ophthalmology.

Contact: Media Relations
media@aao.org
American Academy of Ophthalmology

Public Release: 19-Oct-2014
Nature Nanotechnology
Imaging electric charge propagating along microbial nanowires
UMass Amherst physicists working with Derek Lovley and colleagues report in the current issue of Nature Nanotechnology that they've used a new imaging technique, electrostatic force microscopy, to resolve the biological debate with evidence from physics, showing that electric charges do indeed propagate along microbial nanowires just as they do in carbon nanotubes, a highly conductive man-made material.
Office of Naval Research, US Department of Energy, National Science Foundation

Contact: Janet Lathrop
jlathrop@admin.umass.edu
413-545-0444
University of Massachusetts at Amherst

Public Release: 19-Oct-2014
Nature Chemistry
Crystallizing the DNA nanotechnology dream
For the last 20 years, scientists have tried to design large DNA crystals with precisely prescribed depth and complex features -- a design quest just fulfilled by a team at Harvard's Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering. The team built 32 DNA crystals with precisely-defined depth and an assortment of sophisticated three-dimensional features, an advance reported in Nature Chemistry.
Office of Naval Research, Army Research Office, National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, Wyss Institute of Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University

Contact: Kat J. McAlpine
katherine.mcalpine@wyss.harvard.edu
617-432-8266
Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard

Public Release: 19-Oct-2014
Lancet Infectious Diseases
Group B streptococcus incidence rises significantly among newborns
Group B streptococcus, a major cause of serious infectious diseases including sepsis, meningitis, and pneumonia, has increased by about 60 percent among infants younger than three months in the Netherlands over the past 25 years despite the widespread use of prevention strategies, new research published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases has found.
NIH/National Institute of Public Health and the Environment, European Union's seventh framework programme, Netherlands Organization for Health Research and Development, Academic Medical Center, European Research Council

Contact: Caroline Brogan
c.brogan@lancet.com
The Lancet

Public Release: 19-Oct-2014
Nature Medicine
Lab-developed intestinal organoids form mature human tissue in mice
Researchers have successfully transplanted 'organoids' of functioning human intestinal tissue grown from pluripotent stem cells in a lab dish into mice -- creating an unprecedented model for studying diseases of the intestine. Reporting their results Oct. 19 online in Nature Medicine, scientists from Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center said that, through additional translational research the findings could eventually lead to bioengineering personalized human intestinal tissue to treat gastrointestinal diseases.

Contact: Nick Miller
nicholas.miller@cchmc.org
513-803-6035
Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center

Public Release: 19-Oct-2014
BMC Medicine
Viagra protects the heart beyond the bedroom
Viagra could be used as a safe treatment for heart disease, finds new research published today in the open-access journal BMC Medicine. The study reveals that long-term daily treatment of Viagra can provide protection for the heart at different stages of heart disease, with few side effects.

Contact: Ruth Francis
ruth.francis@biomedcentral.com
44-203-192-2737
BioMed Central

Public Release: 19-Oct-2014
Acta Neuropathologica Communications
Head injury causes the immune system to attack the brain
Scientists have uncovered a surprising way to reduce the brain damage caused by head injuries -- stopping the body's immune system from killing brain cells. The study, published in the open-access journal Acta Neuropathologica Communications, showed that in experiments on mice, an immune-based treatment reduced the size of brain lesions. The authors suggest that if the findings apply to humans, this could help prevent brain damage from accidents, and protect players of contact sports like American football, rugby and boxing.

Contact: Alanna Orpen
alanna.orpen@biomedcentral.com
BioMed Central

Public Release: 19-Oct-2014
Nature Climate Change
Improved electricity access has little impact on climate change
Expanding access to household electricity services accounts for only a small portion of total emission growth, shows a new study from the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis, shedding light on an ongoing debate on potential conflicts between climate and development.

Contact: Katherine Leitzell
leitzell@iiasa.ac.at
43-223-680-7316
International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis

Public Release: 19-Oct-2014
Acute Cardiovascular Care 2014
Women more likely to develop anxiety and depression after heart attack
Patients with depression are nearly six times more likely to die within six months after a heart attack than those without depression. The increased risk of death in patients with depression persists up to 18 months after the heart attack. But despite the fact that post-heart-attack depression is common and burdensome, the condition remains under-recognized and under-treated.

Contact: Jacqueline Partarrieu
press@escardio.org
33-492-947-756
European Society of Cardiology

Public Release: 19-Oct-2014
American Society of Human Genetics 2014 Annual Meeting
Scientists identify mutation associated with cleft palate in humans and dogs
Scientists studying birth defects in humans and purebred dogs have identified an association between cleft lip and cleft palate -- conditions that occur when the lip and mouth fail to form properly during pregnancy -- and a mutation in the ADAMTS20 gene. Their findings were presented today at the American Society of Human Genetics 2014 Annual Meeting in San Diego.
NIH/National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, Canine Health Foundation, Grey Lady Foundation, University of California Davis Center for Companion Animal Health

Contact: Nalini Padmanabhan
press@ashg.org
301-634-7346
American Society of Human Genetics

Public Release: 19-Oct-2014
American Society of Human Genetics 2014 Annual Meeting
Children's genes affect their mothers' risk of rheumatoid arthritis
A child's genetic makeup may contribute to his or her mother's risk of rheumatoid arthritis, possibly explaining why women are at higher risk of developing the disease than men. This research will be presented Tuesday, Oct. 21, at the American Society of Human Genetics 2014 Annual Meeting in San Diego.

Contact: Nalini Padmanabhan
press@ashg.org
301-634-7346
American Society of Human Genetics

Public Release: 19-Oct-2014
American Society of Human Genetics 2014 Annual Meeting
Metabolic genetics research paves way to treating diabetes and obesity
Breaking down complex conditions such as Type 2 diabetes and obesity into the specific metabolic proteins and processes that underlie them offers a new approach to studying the genetics of these diseases and how they are interrelated, according to research presented today at the American Society of Human Genetics 2014 Annual Meeting in San Diego.

Contact: Nalini Padmanabhan
press@ashg.org
301-634-7346
American Society of Human Genetics

Showing releases 451-470 out of 470.

<< < 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19