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Showing releases 51-75 out of 337.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 > >>

Public Release: 28-Jul-2014
FASEB Journal
Potential 'universal' blood test for cancer discovered
Researchers from the University of Bradford, UK, have devised a simple blood test that can be used to diagnose whether people have cancer or not.

Contact: Jenny Watkinson
j.watkinson2@bradford.ac.uk
44-127-423-6030
University of Bradford

Public Release: 28-Jul-2014
Cancer & Metabolism
Cancer: Tumors absorb sugar for mobility
Researchers were able to demonstrate that appetite for sugar and 'mesenchymal behavior' result from the same mechanism. They also showed that the intensity of the phenomenon significantly influenced the chances of patient survival. Published in Cancer & Metabolism, this discovery opens up new potential targets for future therapies.

Contact: Lionel Pousaz
lionel.pousaz@epfl.ch
41-795-597-161
Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne

Public Release: 28-Jul-2014
Nature
Measuring the smallest magnets
Strapping two individual electrons to two ions enabled Weizmann physicists to measure the magnetic interactions between them.

Contact: Yivsam Azgad
news@weizmann.ac.il
972-893-43856
Weizmann Institute of Science

Public Release: 28-Jul-2014
Nature Communications
Mutations from Venus, mutations from Mars
Weizmann Institute researchers explain why genetic fertility problems can persist in a population.

Contact: Yivsam Azgad
news@weizmann.ac.il
972-893-43856
Weizmann Institute of Science

Public Release: 28-Jul-2014
Nature
Interfering with interferon
Virus-killing molecules may need all their skills, including inflammation, to fight HIV infection.

Contact: Yivsam Azgad
news@weizmann.ac.il
972-893-43856
Weizmann Institute of Science

Public Release: 28-Jul-2014
2014 ACS NSQIP National Conference
ACS NSQIP database helps hospital identify and curb its surgical risk
A case study on how one surgical team prevented venous thromboembolisms in their patients placed in isolation was presented today by researchers from the department of surgery at Carilion Clinic Roanoke Memorial Hospital, Roanoke, Va., at the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS NSQIP) National Conference in New York City.

Contact: Sally Garneski
pressinquiry@facs.org
312-202-5409
American College of Surgeons

Public Release: 28-Jul-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Cell's recycling center implicated in division decisions
Most cells do not divide unless there is enough oxygen present to support their offspring, but certain cancer cells and other cell types circumvent this rule. Researchers at The Johns Hopkins University have now identified a mechanism that overrides the cells' warning signals, enabling cancers to continue to divide even without a robust blood supply. In the process, the researchers found that lysosomes -- the cell's protein 'recycling centers' -- help govern cell division decisions.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, American Cancer Society

Contact: Catherine Kolf
ckolf@jhmi.edu
443-440-1929
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 28-Jul-2014
2014 ACS NSQIP National Conference
Tennessee Surgical Quality Collaborative saves 533 lives and $75 million in 3 years
Ten hospitals in the Tennessee Surgical Quality Collaborative have reduced surgical complications by 19.7 percent since 2009, resulting in at least 533 lives saved and $75.2 million in reduced costs, according to new results presented today at the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program National Conference in New York City.

Contact: Sarah Stakston
sstakston@webershandwick.com
952-346-6303
American College of Surgeons

Public Release: 28-Jul-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Google searches hold key to future market crashes
A team of researchers from Warwick Business School and Boston University have developed a method to automatically identify topics that people search for on Google before subsequent stock market falls.

Contact: a.t.frew@warwick.ac.uk
A.T.Frew@warwick.ac.uk
44-024-765-75910
University of Warwick

Public Release: 28-Jul-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
The bit of your brain that signals how bad things could be
An evolutionarily ancient and tiny part of the brain tracks expectations about nasty events, finds new UCL research. The study, published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, demonstrates for the first time that the human habenula, half the size of a pea, tracks predictions about negative events, like painful electric shocks, suggesting a role in learning from bad experiences.
UK Medical Research Council

Contact: Harry Dayantis
h.dayantis@ucl.ac.uk
44-020-310-83844
University College London

Public Release: 28-Jul-2014
Cancer
Lifestyle choices may affect the long-term heart health of childhood cancer survivors
A new study has found that following a healthy lifestyle may lower childhood cancer survivors' risk of developing the metabolic syndrome.

Contact: Evelyn Martinez
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
Wiley

Public Release: 28-Jul-2014
JAMA Internal Medicine
Dementia patients more likely to get implanted pacemakers, says Pitt study
People with dementia are more likely to get implanted pacemakers for heart rhythm irregularities, such as atrial fibrillation, than people who don't have cognitive difficulties, according to researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. In a research letter published online in JAMA Internal Medicine, the researchers noted the finding runs counter to expectations that less aggressive interventions are the norm for patients with the incurable and disabling illness.
Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Institute on Aging

Contact: Anita Srikameswaran
SrikamAV@upmc.edu
412-578-9193
University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences

Public Release: 28-Jul-2014
Nature Communications
Building 'invisible' materials with light
A new technique which uses light like a needle to thread long chains of particles could help bring sci-fi concepts such as cloaking devices one step closer to reality.

Contact: Sarah Collins
sarah.collins@admin.cam.ac.uk
44-012-237-65542
University of Cambridge

Public Release: 28-Jul-2014
JAMA Pediatrics
Electronic screening tool to triage teenagers and risk of substance misuse
An electronic screening tool that starts with a single question to assess the frequency of substance misuse appears to be an easy way to screen teenagers who visited a physician for routine medical care.

Contact: Erin Tornatore
erin.tornatore@childrens.harvard.edu
617-919-3110
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 28-Jul-2014
JAMA Internal Medicine
Research letter examines pacemaker use in patients with cognitive impairment
Patients with dementia were more likely to receive a pacemaker then patients without cognitive impairment.
Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Institute on Aging

Contact: Anita Srikameswaranat
srikamav@upmc.edu
412-578-9193
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 28-Jul-2014
Global Change Biology
Study finds Europe's habitat and wildlife is vulnerable to climate change
New research has identified areas of the Earth that are high priorities for conservation in the face of climate change.

Contact: Glenn Harris
G.Harris@soton.ac.uk
44-023-805-93212
University of Southampton

Public Release: 28-Jul-2014
Diabetologia
Study suggests both high physical activity and less sitting in leisure time may be required to substantially reduce risk of obesity
New research published in Diabetologia, the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes, suggests that both higher levels of physical activity and lower levels of sitting in leisure time may be required to substantially reduce the risk of obesity.

Contact: Joshua Bell
joshua.bell.11@ucl.ac.uk
44-020-310-83844
Diabetologia

Public Release: 28-Jul-2014
Journal of Insect Science
New species of mayfly discovered in India
Scientists have discovered a new species of mayfly in the southern Western Ghats, a mountain range along the west coast of India.

Contact: Richard Levine
rlevine@entsoc.org
301-731-4535
Entomological Society of America

Public Release: 28-Jul-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Impact of Deepwater Horizon oil spill on coral is deeper and broader than predicted
A new discovery of two additional coral communities showing signs of damage from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill expands the impact footprint of the 2010 spill in the Gulf of Mexico.
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative Ecosystem Impacts of Oil and Gas Inputs to the Gulf, Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill Natural Resource Damage Assessment

Contact: Barbara K. Kennedy
science@psu.edu
814-863-4682
Penn State

Public Release: 28-Jul-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
New study confirms water vapor as global warming amplifier
A new study from scientists at the University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science and colleagues confirms rising levels of water vapor in the upper troposphere -- a key amplifier of global warming -- will intensify climate change impacts over the next decades. The new study is the first to show that increased water vapor concentrations in the atmosphere are a direct result of human activities.

Contact: Diana Udel
dudel@rsmas.miami.edu
305-421-4704
University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science

Public Release: 28-Jul-2014
Nature Communications
Superconductivity could form at high temperatures in layered 2D crystals
An elusive state of matter called superconductivity could be realized in stacks of sheetlike crystals just a few atoms thick, new analysis determined. Electrons and 'holes' would accumulate in separate layers of a 2D semiconductor compound in response to an electrical field forming a superfluid gas of indirect excitons. Counterflow superconductivity would result.
US Office of Naval Research, University of California, National Science Foundation, European Research Council, European Commission's Future and Emerging Technologies European Graphene Flagship

Contact: Susan Brown
sdbrown@ucsd.edu
858-246-0161
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 28-Jul-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Learning the smell of fear: Mothers teach babies their own fears via odor, research finds
Babies can learn what to fear in the first days of life just by smelling the odor of their distressed mothers', new research suggests. And not just 'natural' fears: If a mother experienced something before pregnancy that made her fear something specific, her baby will quickly learn to fear it too -- through the odor she gives off when she feels fear.
National Institutes of Health, Brain and Behavior Research Foundation, University of Michigan

Contact: Kara Gavin
kegavin@umich.edu
734-764-2220
University of Michigan Health System

Public Release: 28-Jul-2014
Scientific Reports
Industrial lead pollution beat explorers to the South Pole by 22 years and persists today
Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen became the first man to reach the South Pole in December of 1911. More than 100 years later, an international team of scientists led by Joe McConnell of Nevada's Desert Research Institute have proven that air pollution from industrial activities arrived long before.
NSF/Division of Polar Programs

Contact: Justin Broglio
justin.broglio@dri.edu
775-762-8320
Desert Research Institute

Public Release: 28-Jul-2014
Hepatology
Hepatitis C virus genotype 1 is most prevalent worldwide
In one of the largest prevalence studies to date, researchers from the UK provide national, regional, and global genotype prevalence estimates for the hepatitis C virus. Findings published in Hepatology, a journal of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases, indicate that genotype 1 is the most prevalent worldwide, with over 83 million patients infected of which one-third reside in East Asia.

Contact: Dawn Peters
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
781-388-8408
Wiley

Public Release: 28-Jul-2014
Journal of the American College of Cardiology
Endurance runners more likely to die of heat stroke than heart condition
Heat stroke is 10 times more likely than cardiac events to be life-threatening for runners during endurance races in warm climates, according to a study published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. The authors noted the findings may play a role in the ongoing debate over pre-participation ECG screenings for preventing sudden death in athletes by offering a new perspective on the greatest health risk for runners.

Contact: Nicole Napoli
nnapoli@acc.org
202-375-6523
American College of Cardiology

Showing releases 51-75 out of 337.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 > >>