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Showing releases 51-75 out of 439.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 > >>

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
What americans fear most -- new poll from Chapman University
The Chapman Survey on American Fears included 1,500 participants from across the nation and all walks of life. Underscoring Chapman's growth and emergence in the sciences, the research team leading this effort pared the information down into four basic categories: personal fears, crime, natural disasters and fear factors.

Contact: Sheri Ledbetter
sledbett@chapman.edu
714-289-3143
Chapman University

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Tarantula venom illuminates electrical activity in live cells
Researchers have created a cellular probe that combines a tarantula toxin with a fluorescent compound to help scientists observe electrical activity in neurons and other cells. This is the first time researchers have been able to visually observe these electrical signaling proteins turn on without genetic modification.
Milton L. Shifman Endowed Scholarship for the Neurobiology Course at Woods Hole, National Institutes of Health, American Heart Association

Contact: Carole F. Gan
carole.gan@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu
916-734-9047
University of California - Davis Health System

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
CHEST 2014
Chest
Alternate approach to traditional CPR saves lives
A new study shows that survival and neurological outcomes for patients in cardiac arrest can be improved by adding extracorporeal membrane oxygenation when performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

Contact: Kristi Bruno
kbruno@chestnet.org
773-750-9962
American College of Chest Physicians

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
CHEST 2014
Chest
Two Michigan high school students develop screening tools to detect lung and heart disease
Two Michigan high school students, sisters Ilina and Medha Krishen, have developed screening tools using electronic stethoscopes to detect lung and heart disease. The sisters will present their findings at CHEST 2014 in Austin, Texas next week.

Contact: Kristi Bruno
kbruno@chestnet.org
773-750-9962
American College of Chest Physicians

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
UEG Week 2014
Expert highlights research innovation and is optimistic about the future of IBS treatment
Patients with irritable bowel syndrome may at last be able to hope for a brighter future as innovative new treatments emerge and researchers clarify the role of current therapies.

Contact: Samantha Forster
samantha@spinkhealth.com
44-144-481-1099
United European Gastroenterology

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Clinical Psychological Science
Even depressed people believe that life gets better
Adults typically believe that life gets better -- today is better than yesterday was and tomorrow will be even better than today. A new study shows that even depressed individuals believe in a brighter future, but this optimistic belief may not lead to better outcomes. The findings are published in Clinical Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.

Contact: Anna Mikulak
amikulak@psychologicalscience.org
202-293-9300
Association for Psychological Science

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
The Physics Teacher
Backpack physics: Smaller hikers carry heavier loads
Hikers are generally advised that the weight of the packs they carry should correspond to their own size, with smaller individuals carrying lighter loads. Although petite backpackers might appreciate the excuse to hand off heavier gear to the larger members of the group, it turns out that they may not need the help.

Contact: Jason Socrates Bardi
jbardi@aip.org
240-535-4954
American Institute of Physics

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Nature Communications
Ancient Europeans intolerant to lactose for 5,000 years after they adopted agriculture
By analyzing DNA from petrous bones of ancient Europeans, scientists have identified these peoples remained intolerant to lactose (natural sugar in the milk of mammals) for 5,000 years after they adopted agricultural practices. The scientific team examined nuclear ancient DNA extracted from thirteen individuals from burials from archaeological sites in the Great Hungarian Plain. The skeletons sampled date from 5,700 BC (Early Neolithic) to 800 BC (Iron Age).

Contact: Dominic Martella
dominic.martella@ucd.ie
353-872-959-118
University College Dublin

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Journal of Applied Physics
Exploring X-Ray phase tomography with synchrotron radiation
X-ray phase tomography is an imaging technique that uses penetrating X-rays to create volumetric views through 'slices' of soft biological tissues, and it offers strongly enhanced contrast compared to conventional CT scans, yet scientists do not know which X-ray phase tomography methods are best suited to yield optimized results for a variety of conditions. To answer this question, a large group of researchers in Europe set out to compare three different X-ray phase tomography methods.

Contact: Jason Socrates Bardi
jbardi@aip.org
240-535-4954
American Institute of Physics

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
PLOS Medicine
Large variation in cesarean rates across US hospitals
Katy Kozhimannil and colleagues S.V. Subramanian and Mariana Arcaya used the 2009 and 2010 US Nationwide Inpatient Sample from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project, a 20 percent sample of US hospitals, to study hospital variation in cesarean section rates.
NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

Contact: Maya Sandler
medicinepress@plos.org
PLOS

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
PLOS Medicine
Most published medical research is false; Here's how to improve
In 2005, in a landmark paper viewed well over a million times, John Ioannidis explained in PLOS Medicine why most published research findings are false. To coincide with PLOS Medicine's 10th anniversary he responds to the challenge of this situation by suggesting how the research enterprise could be improved.
Laura and John Arnold Foundation

Contact: Maya Sandler
medicinepress@plos.org
PLOS

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Molecular Psychiatry
UCSF researchers identify key factor in transition from moderate to problem drinking
A team of UC San Francisco researchers has found that a tiny segment of genetic material known as a microRNA plays a central role in the transition from moderate drinking to binge drinking and other alcohol use disorders.
NIH/National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, State of California

Contact: Pete Farley
peter.farley@ucsf.edu
415-502-6397
University of California - San Francisco

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
11 million will lose health insurance if ACA subsidies are eliminated, study finds
Several lawsuits have challenged the legality of the subsidies that help low- and moderate-income people buy private healtah insurance through marketplaces set up under the federal Affordable Care Act. A new study finds that eliminating those subsidies would sharply boost costs for consumers and cause more than 11 million Americans to lose their health insurance.
US Department of Health and Human Services

Contact: Warren Robak
robak@rand.org
310-451-6913
RAND Corporation

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Journal of Chemical Physics
Triplet threat from the sun
The most obvious effects of too much sun exposure are cosmetic, like wrinkled and rough skin. Some damage, however, goes deeper -- ultraviolet light can damage DNA and cause proteins in the body to break down into smaller, sometimes harmful pieces that may also damage DNA, increasing the risk of skin cancer and cataracts. Understanding the specific pathways by which this degradation occurs is an important step in developing protective mechanisms against it.

Contact: Jason Socrates Bardi
jbardi@aip.org
240-535-4954
American Institute of Physics

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
PLOS Biology
Disease outbreak management -- flexibility can save lives and money
What is the best way to handle a disease outbreak? Current efforts to prevent or stem such outbreaks may fall short because of uncertainty and limited information about the real-time dynamics of the specific disease outbreak. A team of epidemiologists, led by two Penn State University researchers, proposes a new approach for responding to and managing disease outbreaks -- a flexible approach that could save many lives and millions of dollars.

Contact: Press Office
biologypress@plos.org
PLOS

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
mBio
Once CD8 T cells take on one virus, they'll fight others too
CD8 T cells are known for becoming attuned to fight a specific pathogen ('adaptive immunity'), but a new study shows that in that process they also become first-responders that can fend off a variety of other invaders ('innate immunity'). The findings suggest that innate immunity changes with the body's experience and that the T cells are more versatile than thought.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: David Orenstein
david_orenstein@brown.edu
401-863-1862
Brown University

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
PLOS Biology
Flexibility in disease outbreak management could save lives and money
Research by a team of epidemiologists from the United Kingdom and the United States has proposed a new approach for responding to and managing disease outbreaks. They say lives and money could be saved if decisions are adapted to relevant information about the dynamics of the current crisis and not based on retrospective analyses of prior crises, trials and interventions.
Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council, National Institutes of Health, US Department of Homeland Security, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation

Contact: Lindsay Brooke
lindsay.brooke@nottingham.ac.uk
44-011-595-15751
University of Nottingham

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
PLOS Biology
In disease outbreak management, flexibility can save lives and money
A new, more flexible, approach for responding to and managing disease outbreaks has been developed that could save many lives and millions of dollars. The approach, called 'adaptive management,' allows decision-makers to use knowledge gained during an outbreak to update ongoing interventions with the goal of containing outbreaks more quickly, efficiently, and effectively.

Contact: Barbara K. Kennedy
science@psu.edu
814-863-4682
Penn State

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
ASN Kidney Week 2014
Binge drinking in young men linked with increased risk of hypertension
Binge drinking in early adulthood is associated with an increased likelihood of high blood pressure in males.

Contact: Kurtis Pivert
kpivert@asn-online.org
202-699-0238
American Society of Nephrology

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Trends in Cognitive Sciences
Impressions shaped by facial appearance foster biased decisions
Research in recent years has shown that people associate specific facial traits with an individual's personality. People consistently associate trustworthiness, competence, dominance, and friendliness with specific facial traits. According to an article in Trends in Cognitive Sciences, people rely on these subtle facial traits to make important decisions, from voting for a political candidate to convicting a suspect for a crime. The authors present its real-world consequences and discuss potential ways of overcoming it.

Contact: Mary Beth O'Leary
moleary@cell.com
617-397-2802
Cell Press

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
American Society of Human Genetics 2014 Annual Meeting
Loss of Y chromosome associated with higher mortality and cancer in men
Age-related loss of the Y chromosome from blood cells, a frequent occurrence among elderly men, is associated with elevated risk of various cancers and earlier death, according to research presented at the American Society of Human Genetics 2014 Annual Meeting in San Diego.

Contact: Nalini Padmanabhan
press@ashg.org
301-634-7346
American Society of Human Genetics

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Researchers identify new signaling pathway thought to play role in rheumatoid arthritis
A study by researchers at Hospital for Special Surgery identifies a new signaling pathway that contributes to the development of inflammatory bone erosion, which occurs in rheumatoid arthritis patients. The study was published online in the Journal of Clinical Investigation. Focusing on a certain variant in a gene called RBP-J, the scientists found that the expression level of this gene in RA patients is significantly lower than that in healthy controls.
NIH/National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases

Contact: Robin Frank
FrankR@hss.edu
516-773-0319
Hospital for Special Surgery

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics
Misreporting diet information could impact nutrition recommendations for Hispanics
A new paper takes a critical look at how faulty self-reporting of the food we eat can lead to incorrect conclusions about whether we are meeting dietary recommendations for certain essential nutrients.

Contact: Talia S Ogliore
togliore@hawaii.edu
808-956-4531
University of Hawaii at Manoa

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
ICES Journal of Marine Science
BOFFFFs (big, old, fat, fertile, female fish) sustain fisheries
A new compilation of research from around the world now shows that big, old, fat, fertile, female fish -- known as BOFFFFs to scientists -- are essential for ensuring that fishery stocks remain sustainable.

Contact: Mark Hixon
hixonm@hawaii.edu
808-956-6427
University of Hawaii at Manoa

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Eating Behaviors
Hungry or not, kids will eat treats
Even though they are not hungry, children as young as three will find high-energy treats too tempting to refuse, new QUT research has found.

Contact: Sandra Hutchinson
s3.hutchinson@qut.edu.au
61-731-389-449
Queensland University of Technology

Showing releases 51-75 out of 439.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 > >>