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Showing releases 51-75 out of 432.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 > >>

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
FASEB Journal
New molecule sneaks medicines across the blood/brain barrier
Delivering life-saving drugs across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) might become a little easier thanks to a new report published in the November 2014 issue of The FASEB Journal. In the report, scientists describe an antibody, called 'FC5,' is one-tenth the size of a traditional antibody and able to cross the BBB.

Contact: Cody Mooneyhan
cmooneyhan@faseb.org
301-634-7104
Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
FASEB Journal
Size matters: Baby's size at birth may predict risk for disease later in life
A new research report published in the November 2014 issue of The FASEB Journal suggests that being overweight might be better in the long term than being underweight.

Contact: Cody Mooneyhan
cmooneyhan@faseb.org
301-634-7104
Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems 2014
Disney Research develops hybrid fluid transmission enabling light and swift robotic arms
Engineers routinely face tradeoffs as they design robotic limbs -- weight vs. speed, ease of control vs. fluidity. A new hybrid fluid transmission developed at Disney Research Pittsburgh promises to eliminate some of those tradeoffs, making possible robot arms that are light enough to move swiftly and gracefully, yet with precise control.

Contact: Jennifer Liu
jennifer.c.liu@disney.com
Disney Research

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
FASEB Journal
BPA exposure by infants may increase later risk of food intolerance
A new research published in November 2014 issue of The FASEB Journal, scientists show, for the first time, that there is a link between perinatal exposure to Bisphenol A (BPA) at low doses and the risk to develop food intolerance in later life.

Contact: Cody Mooneyhan
cmooneyhan@faseb.org
301-634-7104
Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
FASEB Journal
Peripheral clocks don't need the brain's master clock to function correctly
New research published in the November 2014 issue of The FASEB Journal further adds to our understanding of the circadian rhythm by suggesting that the suprachiasmaticus nucleus clock, a tiny region of the hypothalamus considered to be the body's 'master' timekeeper, is not necessary to align body rhythms with the light-dark cycle.

Contact: Cody Mooneyhan
cmooneyhan@faseb.org
301-634-7104
Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
Scientific Reports
Reef-builders with a sense of harmony
Cold-water corals of the species Lophelia pertusa are able to fuse skeletons of genetically distinct individuals. On dives with JAGO, a research submersible stationed at GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, scientists from Scotland and Germany made the first-ever discovery of branches of different colors that had flawlessly merged. The ability to fuse supports the reef stability and thus contributes to the success of corals as reef-builders of the deep sea.

Contact: Maike Nicolai
mnicolai@geomar.de
49-431-600-2807
Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel (GEOMAR)

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
Stem Cell Reports
Reconstruction of a patterned piece of spinal cord in 3-D culture
The central nervous system in vertebrates develops from the neural tube, which is the basis for the differentiation in spinal cord and brain.

Contact: Birte Urban-Eicheler
birte.urban@crt-dresden.de
49-035-145-882-065
Technische Universität Dresden

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
European Physical Journal E
Ion adsorption matter in biology
Biological membranes are mainly composed of lipid bilayers. Gaining a better understanding of adsorption of solution ions onto lipid membranes helps clarify functional processes in biological cells. A new study, published in EPJ E, provides a quantitative description of the equilibria between lipid membranes and surrounding solution ions. In addition to shedding some light on biological processes, these results could also have implications for, among other things, the future development of medical diagnostics.

Contact: Laura Zimmermann
laura.zimmermann@springer.com
49-622-148-78414
Springer

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
Science
Does it help conservation to put a price on nature?
Assigning an economic value to the benefits which nature provides might not always promote the conservation of biodiversity, and in some cases may lead to species loss and conflict, argues a University of Cambridge researcher.

Contact: Sarah Collins
sarah.collins@admin.cam.ac.uk
44-012-233-32300
University of Cambridge

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
IEEE Intelligent Systems
New tech aims to improve communication between dogs and humans
Researchers have developed a suite of technologies that can be used to enhance communication between dogs and humans, which has applications in everything from search and rescue to service dogs to training our pets.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Matt Shipman
matt_shipman@ncsu.edu
919-515-6386
North Carolina State University

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
Cochrane Library
Cochrane Review of RDT for diagnosis of drug resistant TB
Researchers from the Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group, hosted at LSTM, have conducted an independent review to examine the diagnostic accuracy of the GenoType® MTBDRsl assay for the detection of resistance to second-line anti-tuberculosis drugs.

Contact: Gill Wareing
gill.wareing@lstmed.ac.uk
Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
Nucleic Acids Research
The geometry of RNA
To understand the function of an RNA molecule we need to know its three-dimensional structure. Unfortunately, establishing the shape of an RNA strand is anything but easy and often requires a combination of experimental techniques and computer-based simulations. Many computing methods are used but these are often complex and slow. A team of scientists from SISSA – the International School for Advanced Studies of Trieste – has devised a simple and versatile method, based on the geometry of the RNA molecule.

Contact: Federica Sgorbissa
pressoffice@sissa.it
39-040-378-7644
International School of Advanced Studies (SISSA)

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
PLOS ONE
New research show that bats will hang out with their friends this Halloween
New research has shown that despite moving house frequently, bats choose to roost with the same social groups of 'friends.' The study, published today in the scientific journal PLOS ONE, found that different social groups roost in separate, though adjacent, parts of woodland. The findings have important implications for conservation. The research was carried out by scientists from the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology, the University of Exeter and the University of Oxford.
Natural Environment Research Council

Contact: Barnaby Smith
bpgs@ceh.ac.uk
44-079-202-95384
Centre for Ecology & Hydrology

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
Science
Seeing dinosaur feathers in a new light
Why were dinosaurs covered in a cloak of feathers long before the early bird species Archaeopteryx first attempted flight? Researchers from the University of Bonn and the University of Göttingen attempt to answer precisely that question in the latest issue of the renowned journal 'Science.' The evolution of feathers made dinosaurs more colorful, which in turn had a profoundly positive impact on communication, the selection of mates and on dinosaurs' procreation.

Contact: Marie-Claire Koschowitz
m.koschowitz@uni-bonn.de
49-022-873-1786
University of Bonn

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
HIV Research for Prevention (HIV R4P) Conference
Model by NIH grantees explains why HIV prevention dosing differs by sex
A mathematical model developed by NIH grantees predicts that women must take the antiretroviral medication Truvada daily to prevent HIV infection via vaginal sex, whereas just two doses per week can protect men from HIV infection via anal sex. This finding helps explain why two large clinical trials testing HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis, or PrEP, in women failed to show efficacy.
NIAID

Contact: Laura S. Leifman
laura.sivitz@nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism
Experts recommend tumor removal as first-line treatment for acromegaly
The Endocrine Society today issued a Clinical Practice Guideline for the diagnosis and treatment of acromegaly, a rare condition caused by excess growth hormone in the blood.

Contact: Jenni Glenn Gingery
jgingery@endocrine.org
202-971-3655
The Endocrine Society

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
Health Promotion Practice
National initiative shows multisystem approaches to reduce diabetes disparities
Exciting results from an innovative, multicultural, five-year initiative, known as the Alliance to Reduce Disparities in Diabetes, have been published in ten peer-reviewed articles in the November 2014 supplemental issue of Health Promotion Practice. The findings reveal that a new model of chronic disease management for vulnerable populations with diabetes shows significant promise in strengthening coordination of care, reducing diabetes health disparities and improving health outcomes.

Contact: Jeanine Robitaille
jrobitaille@sophe.org
202-408-9804
SAGE Publications

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
Cell Reports
Blocking a fork in the road to DNA replication
A team of Whitehead Institute scientists has discovered the surprising manner in which an enigmatic protein known as SUUR acts to control gene copy number during DNA replication. It's a finding that could shed new light on the formation of fragile genomic regions associated with chromosomal abnormalities.
National Institutes of Health, American Cancer Society, Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation

Contact: Matt Fearer
fearer@wi.mit.edu
617-452-4630
Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
Science
New study finds oceans arrived early to Earth
Earth is known as the Blue Planet because of its oceans, which cover more than 70 percent of the planet's surface and are home to the world's greatest diversity of life. While water is essential for life on the planet, the answers to two key questions have eluded us: where did Earth's water come from and when?
Harriett Jenkins NASA Graduate Fellowship, Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Award for Innovative Research, NASA Cosmochemistry Award

Contact: WHOI Media Office
media@whoi.edu
508-289-3340
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
Science
Magma pancakes beneath Lake Toba
Where do the tremendous amounts of material that are ejected to from huge volcanic calderas during super-eruptions actually originate?

Contact: F.Ossing
ossing@gfz-potsdam.de
49-331-288-1040
GFZ GeoForschungsZentrum Potsdam, Helmholtz Centre

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
JAMA Otolaryngology—Head & Neck Surgery
Self-reported cognitive difficulties better for patients with tinnitus in clinical trial
Using the medication D-cycloserine in conjunction with a computer-assisted cognitive training program to try to improve the bother of tinnitus (persistent ringing in the ears) and its related cognitive difficulties was no more effective than placebo at relieving the bother of the annoying condition although self-reported cognitive deficits improved, according to a study published online by JAMA Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery.

Contact: Julia Evangelou Strait
straitj@wustl.edu
314-286-0141
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
Neuron
Why scratching makes you itch more
Turns out your mom was right: scratching an itch only makes it worse. New research from scientists at the Center for the Study of Itch at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis reveals that scratching causes the brain to release serotonin, which intensifies the itch sensation.
NIH/National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences

Contact: Jim Dryden
jdryden@wustl.edu
314-286-0110
Washington University School of Medicine

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
Science
Hygienic funerals, better protection for health workers offer best chance to stop Ebola
Hygienic funeral practices, case isolation, contact tracing with quarantines, and better protection for health care workers are the keys to stopping the Ebola epidemic that continues to expand in West Africa, researchers said today in a new report in the journal Science. They said broad implementation of aggressive measures they recommend could lead to its control in Liberia, the focal point, by mid-March.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Jan Medlock
jan.medlock@oregonstate.edu
541-737-6874
Oregon State University

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
American Journal of Transplantation
Frailty increases kidney transplant recipients' risk of dying prematurely
Regardless of age, frailty is a strong risk factor for dying prematurely after a kidney transplant. The finding, which comes from a new study published in the American Journal of Transplantation, suggests that patients should be screened for frailty prior to kidney transplantation, and that those who are identified as frail should be closely monitored after the procedure.

Contact: Evelyn Martinez
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
201-748-6358
Wiley

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
Environmental Health
Air quality and unconventional oil and gas sites
Research suggesting air pollutants released by unconventional oil and gas production are well over recommended levels in the US is published today in the open access journal Environmental Health. High levels of benzene, hydrogen sulfide and formaldehyde were found. The study is the first to be based on community sampling by people who live near production sites and could be used to supplement official air-quality monitoring programs.

Contact: Ruth Francis
ruth.francis@biomedcentral.com
BioMed Central

Showing releases 51-75 out of 432.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 > >>