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Showing releases 51-75 out of 470.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 > >>

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Geology
Desert streams: Deceptively simple
Volatile rainstorms drive complex landscape changes in deserts, particularly in dryland channels, which are shaped by flash flooding. Paradoxically, such desert streams have surprisingly simple topography with smooth, straight and symmetrical form that until now has defied explanation.

Contact: Julie Cohen
julie.cohen@ucsb.edu
805-893-7220
University of California - Santa Barbara

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Cell Reports
Experimental breast cancer drug holds promise in combination therapy for Ewing sarcoma
Ewing sarcoma tumors disappeared and did not return in more than 70 percent of mice treated with combination therapy that included drugs from a family of experimental agents developed to fight breast cancer, reported St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, Alex's Lemonade Stand Foundation for Childhood Cancer, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Tully Family Foundation, ALSAC

Contact: Summer Freeman
summer.freeman@stjude.org
901-595-3061
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Diabetes
Study finds significant increase in type 1 diabetes rates among non-Hispanic white youth
The rate of non-Hispanic white youth diagnosed with type 1 diabetes increased significantly from 2002 to 2009 in all but the youngest age group of children, according to a new study published today in the journal Diabetes.

Contact: Vincent Staupe
vstaupe@golin.com
415-318-4386
Kaiser Permanente

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
HortTechnology
Helping sweet cherries survive the long haul
Research into the effectiveness of hydrocooling of sweet cherries at commercial packing houses determined the need for post-packing cooling. Analyses determined that core temperatures achieved by in-line hydrocoolers during packing did not reduce temperatures sufficiently to ensure good quality retention over the longer periods of time required for container shipping to export markets. The study recommends forced-air cooling to further reduce sweet cherry temperatures in the box before shipping.

Contact: Michael W. Neff
mwneff@ashs.org
703-836-4606
American Society for Horticultural Science

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
ACM IMC 2014
Study: Some online shoppers pay more than others
A new study co-authored by a team of Northeastern University faculty and students has found numerous instances of price steering and discrimination on many popular e-commerce retail and travel websites. That's not necessarily a bad thing, they say -- so long as the companies are transparent.

Contact: Kara Shemin
kara.shemin@neu.edu
617-373-2802
Northeastern University

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Cell
TCGA study improves understanding of genetic drivers of thyroid cancer
An analysis of the genomes of nearly 500 papillary thyroid carcinomas -- the most common form of thyroid cancer -- provided new insights into the roles of frequently mutated cancer genes and other alterations driving disease development. The findings also may help improve diagnosis and treatment. Investigators with The Cancer Genome Atlas project identified new molecular subtypes that will help clinicians determine which tumors are more aggressive and which are more likely to respond to certain treatments.
NIH/National Human Genome Research Institute, NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Steven Benowitz
steven.benowitz@nih.gov
301-451-8325
NIH/National Human Genome Research Institute

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Child Psychiatry and Human Development
Bradley Hospital finds sleep difficulties common among toddlers with psychiatric disorders
John Boekamp, Ph.D., clinical director of the Pediatric Partial Hospital Program at Bradley Hospital recently led a study that found sleep difficulties -- particularly problems with falling asleep -- were very common among toddlers and preschool-aged children who were receiving clinical treatment for a wide range of psychiatric disorders. The study, titled 'Sleep Onset and Night Waking Insomnias in Preschoolers with Psychiatric Disorders,' is now published online in the journal Child Psychiatry & Human Development.

Contact: Jill Reuter
jreuter@lifespan.org
401-432-1328
Lifespan

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Wayne State researcher finds key signaling pathway in cause of preeclampsia
A team of researchers led by a Wayne State University School of Medicine associate professor of obstetrics and gynecology has published findings that provide novel insight into the cause of preeclampsia, the leading cause of maternal and infant death worldwide, a discovery that could lead to the development of new therapeutic treatments.

Contact: Julie O'Connor
julie.oconnor@wayne.edu
313-577-8845
Wayne State University - Office of the Vice President for Research

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Appetite
Changes at the grocery store could turn the burden of shopping with children on its head
Avoiding power struggles in the grocery store with children begging for sweets, chips and other junk foods -- and parents often giving in -- could be helped by placing the healthier options at the eye level of children and moving the unhealthy ones out of the way.
Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future, GRACE Communications Foundation

Contact: Barbara Benham
bbenham1@jhu.edu
410-614-6029
Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
NASA's Terra satellite shows a more organized Tropical Storm Ana
The strong southwesterly wind shear that has been battering Tropical Storm Ana has abated and has given the storm a chance to re-organize. Ana appeared more rounded on imagery from NASA's Terra satellite as thunderstorms again circled the low-level center.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Medical Care
62 percent of colorectal cancer patients report financial burden from treatment, study finds
Nearly two-thirds of patients treated for colorectal cancer reported some measure of financial burden due to their treatment, according to a new study. The burden was greatest among patients who received chemotherapy.
American Cancer Society

Contact: Nicole Fawcett
nfawcett@umich.edu
734-764-2220
University of Michigan Health System

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Fires in the southern United States
In this image taken by the Aqua satellite of the southern United States actively burning areas as detected by MODIS's thermal bands are outlined in red.
NASA

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Biomacromolecules
NYU researchers break nano barrier to engineer the first protein microfiber
Researchers have broken new ground in the development of proteins that form specialized fibers used in medicine and nanotechnology. For as long as scientists have been able to create new proteins that are capable of self-assembling into fibers, their work has taken place on the nanoscale. For the first time, this achievement has been realized on the microscale -- a leap of magnitude in size that presents significant new opportunities for using engineered protein fibers.
US Army Research Office, National Science Foundation

Contact: Kathleen Hamilton
kathleen.hamilton@nyu.edu
718-260-3792
New York University Polytechnic School of Engineering

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Journal of Neuroscience
Reminiscing can help boost mental performance
New research led by Cornell University neuroscientist Nathan Spreng shows for the first time that engaging brain areas linked to so-called 'off-task' mental activities (such as mind-wandering and reminiscing) can actually boost performance on some challenging mental tasks.

Contact: Melissa Osgood
mmo59@cornell.edu
607-255-2059
Cornell University

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Depression and Anxiety
Pre-enlistment mental disorders and suicidality among new US Army soldiers
Two new reports show that new soldiers and civilians do not differ in their probability of having at least one lifetime mental disorder but that some mental disorders are more common among new soldiers than civilians. In addition, the rates of pre-enlistment suicidality among new soldiers are comparable to matched civilians.
US Department of the Army, US Department of Health and Human Services, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: David Cameron
david_cameron@hms.harvard.edu
617-432-0441
Harvard Medical School

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society
Lucky star escapes black hole with minor damage
Astronomers have gotten the closest look yet at what happens when a black hole takes a bite out of a star -- and the star lives to tell the tale.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy

Contact: Pam Frost Gorder
gorder.1@osu.edu
614-292-9475
Ohio State University

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Biophysical Journal
Cornell chemists show ALS is a protein aggregation disease
Using a technique that illuminates subtle changes in individual proteins, chemistry researchers at Cornell University have uncovered new insight into the underlying causes of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

Contact: Melissa Osgood
mmo59@cornell.edu
607-255-2059
Cornell University

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Cancer Cell
Cancer exosome 'micro factories' aid in cancer progression
Exosomes, tiny, virus-sized particles released by cancer cells, can bioengineer micro-RNA molecules resulting in tumor growth. They do so with the help of proteins, such as one named Dicer.

Contact: Ron Gilmore
rlgilmore1@mdanderson.org
713-745-1898
University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
Birds roosting in large groups less likely to contract West Nile virus
A University of Illinois study found that when large groups of birds roost together the chances that an individual bird will get bitten by mosquitoes carrying West Nile virus and subsequently contract the disease actually go down.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Debra Levey Larson
dlarson@illinois.edu
217-244-2880
University of Illinois College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics
Study: Many in US have poor nutrition, with the disabled doing worst
A new study finds that most US adults fail to meet recommended daily levels of 10 key nutrients, and those with disabilities have even worse nutrition than average.

Contact: Diana Yates
diya@illinois.edu
217-333-5802
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Therapeutic Hypothermia and Temperature Management
New, faster therapeutic hypothermia techniques
Rapid lowering of body temperature following an acute myocardial infarction can be an effective therapeutic strategy to minimize damage to the heart muscle caused by the loss and restoration of blood flow to the heart. While hypothermia shows clinical promise, current methods to cool the heart are insufficient. Faster, more effective techniques are needed to realize the full cardioprotective potential of this emerging intervention, as described in an article in Therapeutic Hypothermia and Temperature Management.

Contact: Kathryn Ryan
kryan@liebertpub.com
914-740-2100
Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Lancet
Treating ill health might not be enough to help homeless people get off the streets
Health care providers should recognize that any effective strategy to address homelessness needs to include both interventions to improve the health of homeless individuals as well as larger-scale policy changes, according to a paper published today.

Contact: Leslie Shepherd
shepherdl@smh.ca
416-864-6094
St. Michael's Hospital

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
New England Journal of Medicine
Shorter TB treatment not a successful alternative
A clinical drug trial conducted in five Sub-Sahara African countries shows that a shortened (four month) treatment for tuberculosis is well tolerated and may work well in subsets of TB patients, but overall could not be considered as an alternative to the current six month standard treatment. The results of the study, a collaboration including researchers from the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, were published in the New England Journal of Medicine.
Special Programme for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases, European Commission

Contact: Jenny Orton
press@lshtm.ac.uk
44-020-792-72802
London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Journal of Homeland Security and Emergency Management
Flu at the zoo and other disasters: Experts help animal exhibitors prepare for the worst
Here are three disaster scenarios for zoo or aquarium managers: one, a wildfire lunges towards your facility, threatening your staff and hundreds of zoo animals. Two, hurricane floodwaters pour into your basement, where more than 10,000 exotic fish and marine mammals live in giant tanks. Three, local poultry farmers report avian influenza (bird flu) in their chickens, a primary source of protein for your big cats. What do you do?
US Department of Agriculture

Contact: Diana Yates
diya@illinois.edu
217-333-5802
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Journal of Nitric Oxide, Biology and Chemistry
Beetroot beneficial for athletes and heart failure patients, research finds
Researchers find the nitrate in beetroot targets fast-twitch muscles, increasing the blood flow to muscles that receive less oxygen. This can increase high-intensity athletic performance and improve quality of life of heart failure patients.

Contact: David Poole
poole@vet.k-state.edu
785-532-4529
Kansas State University

Showing releases 51-75 out of 470.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 > >>