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Showing releases 76-100 out of 411.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 > >>

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Novel stapled peptide nanoparticle combination prevents RSV infection, study finds
A new preclinical study by teams at Dana-Farber/Boston Children's/Harvard and James A. Haley VA Hospital/University of South Florida suggests that a combination of advanced technologies may lead to a therapy to prevent or treat respiratory syncytial virus, a potentially lethal respiratory infection affecting infants, young children and the elderly.
National Institutes of Health, US Deptartment of Veterans Affairs, Burroughs Wellcome Fund Career Award

Contact: Anne DeLotto Baier
abaier@health.usf.edu
813-974-3300
University of South Florida (USF Health)

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
PLOS Computational Biology
Tracking flu levels with Wikipedia
Can monitoring Wikipedia hits show how many people have the flu? Researchers at Boston Children's Hospital, USA, have developed a method of estimating levels of influenza-like illness in the American population by analyzing Internet traffic on specific flu-related Wikipedia articles.

Contact: David McIver
david.mciver@childrens.harvard.edu
857-234-3432
PLOS

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
BMJ
Is UK shale gas extraction posing a risk to public health?
More needs to be done to investigate the risks to human health that extracting shale gas poses, suggests a personal view published on bmj.com today.

Contact: Stephanie Burns
sburns@bmj.com
44-020-738-36920
BMJ-British Medical Journal

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
BMJ
Experts call for higher exam pass marks to close performance gap between international and UK medical graduates
The pass mark for a two-part test that international medical graduates must pass to work as a doctor in the UK should be raised to reduce differences in performance between international and UK medical graduates, suggest researchers on bmj.com today.

Contact: Stephanie Burns
sburns@bmj.com
44-020-738-36920
BMJ-British Medical Journal

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
A cross-section of the universe
An image of a galaxy cluster taken by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope gives a remarkable cross-section of the universe, showing objects at different distances and stages in cosmic history. They range from cosmic near neighbors to objects seen in the early years of the universe. The 14-hour exposure shows objects around a billion times fainter than can be seen with the naked eye.

Contact: Georgia Bladon
gbladon@partner.eso.org
49-893-200-6855
ESA/Hubble Information Centre

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
Journal of Clinical Investigation
New pain relief targets discovered
Scientists have identified new pain relief targets that could be used to provide relief from chemotherapy-induced pain. BBSRC-funded researchers at King's College London made the discovery when researching how pain occurs in nerves in the periphery of the body.
Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council

Contact: Chris Melvin
chris.melvin@bbsrc.ac.uk
01-793-414-694
Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
Arthritis & Rheumatology
Sprifermin offers benefit for cartilage loss from knee osteoarthritis
Results published in Arthritis & Rheumatology, a journal of the American College of Rheumatology, showed that sprifermin dosed at 100µg reduced loss of cartilage thickness and volume in the total femorotibial joint and in the lateral knee compartment (outside of the knee).

Contact: Dawn Peters
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
781-388-8408
Wiley

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
PLOS Genetics
First genetic link discovered to difficult-to-diagnose breast cancer sub-type
The discovery of the genetic variant, in conjunction with other markers, could help in the development of future genetic screening tools to assess women's risk of developing invasive lobular cancer, and also gives researchers important new clues about the genetic causes of the disease and a related precursor to cancer called lobular carcinoma in situ.

Contact: Henry French
henry.french@icr.ac.uk
44-207-153-5582
Institute of Cancer Research

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
Science
Connecting sleep deficits among young fruit flies to disruption in mating later in life
Mom always said you need your sleep, and it turns out, she was right. According to a new study published in Science, the lack of sleep in young fruit flies profoundly diminishes their ability to do one thing they do really, really well -- make more flies.
National Institutes of Health, Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Contact: Karen Kreeger
karen.kreeger@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-5658
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
Science
Researchers find boosting depression-causing mechanisms in the brain increases resilience
Conventional antidepressants work by dampening neurobiological mechanisms in the brain, but a new study, unexpectedly, found for the first time time, that further activation of neurons opens a new avenue to mimic and promote natural resilience. The authors say that it may lead to novel targets for naturally acting antidepressants.
National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Sid Dinsay
sid.dinsay@mountsinai.org
212-241-9200
The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
Molecular Cell
Discovery could lead to novel therapies for Fragile X syndrome
Scientists studying the most common form of inherited mental disability -- a genetic disease called 'Fragile X syndrome' -- have uncovered new details about the cellular processes responsible for the condition that could lead to the development of therapies to restore some of the capabilities lost in affected individuals.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Kim McDonald
kmcdonald@ucsd.edu
858-534-7572
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
The story of animal domestication retold
A review of recent research on the domestication of large herbivores for 'The Modern View of Domestication,' a special feature of PNAS, suggests that neither intentional breeding nor genetic isolation were as significant as traditionally thought.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Diana Lutz
dlutz@wustl.edu
314-935-5272
Washington University in St. Louis

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
PLOS ONE
Our brains are hardwired for language
People blog, they don't lbog, and they schmooze, not mshooze. But why is this? Why are human languages so constrained? Can such restrictions unveil the basis of the uniquely human capacity for language?

Contact: Iris Berent
i.berent@neu.edu
617-680-9848
Northeastern University College of Science

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Genetic study tackles mystery of slow plant domestications
Did domesticating a plant typically take a few hundred or many thousands of years? Genetic studies often indicate that domestication traits have a fairly simple genetic basis, which should facilitate their rapid evolution under selection. On the other hand, recent archeological studies of crop domestication have suggested a relatively slow spread and fixation of domestication traits. An article in 'The Modern View of Domestication,' a special issue of PNAS, tries to resolve the discrepancy.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Diana Lutz
dlutz@wustl.edu
314-935-5272
Washington University in St. Louis

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
PLOS Genetics
Deadly human pathogen Cryptococcus fully sequenced
A ten-year effort by an international team has sequenced the entire genome and all the RNA products of the most important pathogenic lineage of Cryptococcus neoformans, a strain called H99.These genetic instructions can give valuable insight into why a fungus responsible for a million cases of pneumonia and meningitis every year is so malleable and dangerous.
National Institutes of Health, French National Research Agency, National Health and Medical Research

Contact: Karl Bates
karl.bates@duke.edu
919-681-8054
Duke University

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
Science
Science: There's something ancient in the icebox
Scientists were greatly surprised to discover an ancient tundra landscape preserved under the Greenland Ice Sheet, below two miles of ice. This finding, led by geologists at the University of Vermont, provides strong evidence that the ice sheet has persisted much longer than previously known, enduring through many past periods of global warming.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Joshua Brown
joshua.e.brown@uvm.edu
802-656-3039
University of Vermont

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
PLOS Pathogens
How the immune system prevents repeated malaria fever episodes in highly exposed children
Children in Mali (and many other regions where malaria is common) are infected with malaria parasites more than 100 times a year, but they get sick with malaria fever only a few times. To understand how the immune system manages to prevent malaria fever in most cases, Peter Crompton and colleagues in the US and in Mali, analyzed immune cells from healthy children before the malaria season and from the same children after their first bout of malaria fever during the ensuing malaria season.

Contact: Peter Crompton
pcrompton@niaid.nih.gov
301-496-2959
PLOS

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
PLOS Pathogens
Proteomics discovers link between muscle damage and cerebral malaria
Malaria-related complications remain a major cause of death for children in many parts of the world. Why some children develop these complications while others don't is still not understood. A multidisciplinary group of scientists and clinicians under the direction of Peter Nilsson (SciLifeLab and KTH, Sweden), Mats Wahlgren (Karolinska Institutet, Sweden), Delmiro Fernandez-Reyes (Brighton & Sussex Medical School, UK) and Olugbemiro Sodeinde (College of Medicine, University of Ibadan, Nigeria), report results of a systematic proteomics approach to the question in PLOS Pathogens.

Contact: Peter Nilsson
peter.nilsson@scilifelab.se
46-852-481-418
PLOS

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
Neuron
Neurons in the brain tune into different frequencies for different spatial memory tasks
Your brain transmits information about your current location and memories of past locations over the same neural pathways using different frequencies of a rhythmic electrical activity called gamma waves, report neuroscientists at The University of Texas at Austin. The research, published in the journal Neuron on April 17, may provide insight into the cognitive and memory disruptions seen in diseases such as schizophrenia and Alzheimer's, in which gamma waves are disturbed.
Klingenstein Fund, Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Marc Airhart
mairhart@austin.utexas.edu
512-232-1066
University of Texas at Austin

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
PLOS Genetics
New gene variant found increases the risk of colorectal cancer from eating processed meat
A common genetic variant that affects one in three people appears to significantly increase the risk of colorectal cancer from the consumption of processed meat, according to study published today in PLOS Genetics.

Contact: Jane C. Figueiredo
janefigu@usc.edu
PLOS

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
Journal of the American Society of Nephrology
Prenatal risk factors may put children at risk of developing kidney disease
Low birth weight and maternal conditions, including diabetes and overweight/obesity, are linked the development of kidney disease in children. Additional studies are needed to see if modifying these factors can reduce the incidence of kidney disease.

Contact: Tracy Hampton
thampton@nasw.org
American Society of Nephrology

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
Cell Reports
For resetting circadian rhythms, neural cooperation is key
Fruit flies are pretty predictable when it comes to scheduling their days, with peaks of activity at dawn and dusk and rest times in between. Now, researchers reporting in the Cell Press journal Cell Reports on April 17 have found that the clusters of brain cells responsible for each of those activity peaks -- known as the morning and evening oscillators, respectively -- don't work alone. For flies' internal clocks to follow the sun, cooperation is key.

Contact: Mary Beth O'Leary
moleary@cell.com
617-397-2802
Cell Press

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
Molecular Cell
Research points to potential treatment strategy for Fragile X syndrome
Individuals with Fragile X syndrome cannot produce enough of a protein -- called the fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) -- whose function has remained somewhat mysterious. Now researchers show that the FMRP protein regulates the machinery within a cell that is responsible for generating all functional proteins. The findings provide new insights into how Fragile X syndrome develops and could lead to novel therapies that might help restore some of the capabilities lost in affected individuals.

Contact: Mary Beth O'Leary
moleary@cell.com
617-397-2802
Cell Press

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
Current Biology
In sex-reversed cave insects, females have the penises
Researchers reporting in the Cell Press journal Current Biology on April 17 have discovered little-known cave insects with rather novel sex lives. The Brazilian insects, which represent four distinct but related species in the genus Neotrogla, are the first example of an animal with sex-reversed genitalia.

Contact: Mary Beth O'Leary
moleary@cell.com
617-397-2802
Cell Press

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
Nature
Trisomy 21: How an extra little chromosome throws the entire genome off balance
A study conducted by Stylianos Antonarakis and his team in the Department of Genetic Medicine and Development at the University of Geneva Faculty of Medicine light on how the extra chromosome 21 upsets the equilibrium of the entire genome, causing a wide variety of pathologies.

Contact: Stylianos Antonarakis
stylianos.antonarakis@unige.ch
41-223-795-708
Université de Genève

Showing releases 76-100 out of 411.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 > >>