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Showing releases 76-100 out of 305.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 > >>

Public Release: 26-Nov-2014
PLOS ONE
Carnegie Mellon researchers identify brain regions that encode words, grammar, story
Carnegie Mellon University scientists have produced the first integrated computational model of reading, identifying which parts of the brain are responsible for such sub-processes as parsing sentences, determining the meaning of words and understanding relationships between characters. They based their results on brain scan of people reading a Harry Potter book.
National Science Foundation, NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Contact: Byron Spice
bspice@cs.cmu.edu
412-268-9068
Carnegie Mellon University

Public Release: 26-Nov-2014
Nature
Modeling the past to understand the future of a stronger El Nino
El Nino is not a contemporary phenomenon; it's long been the Earth's dominant source of year-to-year climate fluctuation. But as the climate warms and the feedbacks that drive the cycle change, researchers want to know how El Nino will respond. A team of researchers led by the University of Wisconsin's Zhengyu Liu published the latest findings in this quest Nov. 27, 2014 in Nature.

Contact: Zhengyu Liu
zliu3@wisc.edu
608-262-0777
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Public Release: 26-Nov-2014
Nature
Study finds potential predictive biomarker for response to PD-L1 checkpoint blocker
Scientists analyzed tissue samples from patients who had -- and had not -- responded to a promising new immunotherapy drug. The study could help identify patients most likely to respond to the new drug, which blocks PD-L1.
Genentech Inc.

Contact: Teresa M Herbert
teresa_herbert@dfci.harvard.edu
617-632-5653
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Public Release: 26-Nov-2014
The 24th Alzheimer Europe Conference
Moderate coffee consumption may lower the risk of Alzheimer's disease by up to 20 percent
An Alzheimer Europe session report by the Institute for Scientific Information on Coffee highlights the potential role of coffee consumption in reducing the risk of Alzheimer's disease.

Contact: Laura Blott
isic@kaizo.co.uk
44-203-176-4702
Kaizo

Public Release: 26-Nov-2014
Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation
Teens with a history of TBI are nearly 4 times more likely to have used crystal meth
Ontario students between grades 9 and 12 who said they had a traumatic brain injury in their lifetime, also reported drug use rates two to four times higher than peers with no history of TBI, according to research published today in the Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation.

Contact: Geoff Koehler
koehlerg@smh.ca
416-864-6060 x6537
St. Michael's Hospital

Public Release: 26-Nov-2014
56th ASH Annual Meeting & Exposition
New England Journal of Medicine
Two studies identify a detectable, pre-cancerous state in the blood
Researchers from the Broad Institute, Harvard Medical School, and Harvard-affiliated hospitals have uncovered an easily detectable, 'pre-malignant' state in the blood that significantly increases the likelihood that an individual will go on to develop blood cancers such as leukemia, lymphoma, or myelodysplastic syndrome. The discovery, which was made independently by two research teams affiliated with the Broad and partner institutions, opens new avenues for research aimed at early detection and prevention of blood cancer.
National Institutes of Health, Gabrielle's Angel Foundation, Leukemia and Lymphoma Society, Stanley Center for Psychiatric Research, NIH/National Human Genome Research Institute, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Wellcome Trust, and others

Contact: Veronica Meade-Kelly
veronica@broadinstitute.org
617-714-7113
Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard

Public Release: 26-Nov-2014
ecancermedicalscience
How a common antacid could lead to cheaper anti-cancer drugs
A popular indigestion medication can increase survival in colorectal cancer, according to research published in ecancermedicalscience. But in fact, scientists have studied this for years -- and a group of cancer advocates want to know why this research isn't more widely used. 'Cimetidine is a drug that can meet patient needs now -- so we need to ask ourselves: what's stopping it being used?' asks Pantziarka.

Contact: Katie Foxall
katie@ecancer.org
01-179-420-852
ecancermedicalscience

Public Release: 26-Nov-2014
Science Translational Medicine
Blistering skin disease may be treatable with 'therapeutic reprogramming,' researchers say
Induced pluripotent stem cells made from patients with a form of blistering skin disease can be genetically corrected and used to grow back healthy skin cells in laboratory dishes, researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have found. They've termed the new technique 'therapeutic reprogramming.'

Contact: Krista Conger
kristac@stanford.edu
650-725-5371
Stanford University Medical Center

Public Release: 26-Nov-2014
Neurology
Why do so many seniors with memory loss and dementia never get tested?
Despite clear signs that their memory and thinking abilities have gone downhill, more than half of seniors with these symptoms haven't seen a doctor about them, a new study finds. The researchers say their findings suggest that as many as 1.8 million Americans over the age of 70 with dementia are not evaluated for cognitive symptoms by a medical provider.
University of Michigan, NIH/National Institute on Aging, University of Utah

Contact: Kara Gavin
kegavin@umich.edu
734-764-2220
University of Michigan Health System

Public Release: 26-Nov-2014
Nature Communications
'Giant' charge density disturbances discovered in nanomaterials
Scientists in Jülich have, with the help of computer simulations, discovered a combination of materials that strengthens the so-called Friedel oscillations and bundles them, as if with a lens, in different directions. With a range of 50 nanometers, these 'giant anisotropic charge density oscillations' are many times greater than normal and open up new possibilities in the field of nanoelectronics to exchange or filter magnetic information.
Helmholtz Young Investigators Groups

Contact: Angela Wenzik
a.wenzik@fz-juelich.de
49-246-161-6048
Forschungszentrum Juelich

Public Release: 26-Nov-2014
Cell Reports
Enzyme may be key to cancer progression in many tumors
A new University of Iowa study provided a deeper understanding of how KRAS turns off tumor suppressor genes and identifies a key enzyme in the process. The findings, published online Nov. 26 in the journal Cell Reports, suggest that this enzyme, known as TET1, may be an important target for cancer diagnostics and treatment.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Jennifer Brown
jennifer-l-brown@uiowa.edu
319-621-5266
University of Iowa Health Care

Public Release: 26-Nov-2014
Nature
Using supermassive black holes to measure cosmic distances
One of the major problems in astronomy is measuring very large distances in the universe. The current most common methods measure relative distances, but now research from the Niels Bohr Institute demonstrates that precise distances can be measured using supermassive black holes. The results are published in the scientific journal, Nature.

Contact: Gertie Skaarup
skaarup@nbi.dk
45-28-75-06-20
University of Copenhagen - Niels Bohr Institute

Public Release: 26-Nov-2014
Nature
'Eye of Sauron' provides new way of measuring distances to galaxies
A team of scientists, led by Dr. Sebastian Hoenig from the University of Southampton, have developed a new way of measuring precise distances to galaxies tens of millions of light years away.

Contact: Glenn Harris
G.Harris@soton.ac.uk
44-023-805-93212
University of Southampton

Public Release: 26-Nov-2014
A colorful gathering of middle-aged stars
The MPG/ESO 2.2-meter telescope at ESO's La Silla Observatory in Chile has captured a richly colorful view of the bright star cluster NGC 3532. Some of the stars still shine with a hot bluish color, but many of the more massive ones have become red giants and glow with a rich orange hue.

Contact: Richard Hook
rhook@eso.org
49-893-200-6655
ESO

Public Release: 26-Nov-2014
Nature
Stanford engineers invent high-tech mirror to beam heat away from buildings into space
Stanford engineers have invented a material designed to help cool buildings. The material reflects incoming sunlight, and it sends heat from inside the structure directly into space as infrared radiation.

Contact: Tom Abate
tabate@stanford.edu
650-736-2245
Stanford School of Engineering

Public Release: 26-Nov-2014
Stem Cell Reports
iPS cells used to correct genetic mutations that cause muscular dystrophy
Researchers at CiRA show that iPS cells can be used to correct genetic mutations that cause Duchenne muscular dystrophy. The research demonstrates how engineered nucleases, such as TALEN and CRISPR, can be used to edit the genome of iPS cells generated from the skin cells of a DMD patient. The cells were then differentiated into skeletal muscles, in which the mutation responsible for DMD had disappeared.

Contact: Akemi Nakamura
cira-pr@cira.kyoto-u.ac.jp
81-753-667-005
Center for iPS Cell Research and Application - Kyoto University

Public Release: 26-Nov-2014
Cancer Cell
Research on a rare cancer exposes possible route to new treatments
Researchers from Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah discovered the unusual role of lactate in the metabolism of alveolar soft part sarcoma and also confirmed that a fusion gene is the cancer-causing agent in this disease.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Linda Aagard
801-587-7639
University of Utah Health Sciences

Public Release: 26-Nov-2014
PLOS ONE
Arctic conditions may become critical for polar bears by end of 21st century
Shifts in the timing and duration of ice cover, especially the possible lengthening of ice-free periods, may impact polar bears under projected warming before the end of the 21st century.

Contact: Kayla Graham
onepress@plos.org
PLOS

Public Release: 26-Nov-2014
PLOS ONE
Post-medieval Polish buried as potential 'vampires' were likely local
Potential 'vampires' buried in northwestern Poland with sickles and rocks across their bodies were likely local and not immigrants to the region.

Contact: Kayla Graham
onepress@plos.org
PLOS

Public Release: 26-Nov-2014
PLOS ONE
DNA may survive suborbital spaceflight, re-entry
Plasmid DNA attached to the outer surface of a sounding rocket may be able to withstand rocket launch, a period of residence in suborbital space, re-entry, and landing conditions into the Earth's atmosphere, all the while staying intact and active in its function as carrier of genetic information.

Contact: Kayla Graham
onepress@plos.org
PLOS

Public Release: 26-Nov-2014
Molecular Cell
An enzyme that fixes broken DNA sometimes destroys it instead, Stanford researchers find
Enzymes inside cells that normally repair damaged DNA sometimes wreck it instead, researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have found. The insight could lead to a better understanding of the causes of some types of cancer and neurodegenerative disease.

Contact: Rosanne Spector
manishma@stanford.edu
650-725-5374
Stanford University Medical Center

Public Release: 26-Nov-2014
Neurology
Study: Most people with dementia never have screening
The majority of people with dementia have never seen a doctor about their memory and thinking problems, according to a new study published in the Nov. 26, 2014, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Contact: Rachel Seroka
rseroka@aan.com
612-928-6129
American Academy of Neurology

Public Release: 26-Nov-2014
Current Biology
With age, we lose our visual learning filter
Older people can actually take in and learn from visual information more readily than younger people do, according to new evidence reported in the Cell Press journal Current Biology on November 26. This surprising discovery is explained by an apparent decline with age in the ability to filter out irrelevant information.

Contact: Mary Beth O'Leary
moleary@cell.com
617-397-2802
Cell Press

Public Release: 26-Nov-2014
Current Biology
Dogs hear our words and how we say them
When people hear another person talking to them, they respond not only to what is being said -- those consonants and vowels strung together into words and sentences -- but also to other features of that speech -- the emotional tone and the speaker's gender, for instance. Now, a report in the journal Current Biology on Nov. 26 provides some of the first evidence of how dogs also differentiate and process those various components of human speech.

Contact: Mary Beth O'Leary
moleary@cell.com
617-397-2802
Cell Press

Public Release: 26-Nov-2014
Current Biology
Elderly brains learn, but maybe too much
Learning requires both mental flexibility, or 'plasticity,' and stability. A new study finds that in learning a visual task, older people exhibited a surprising degree of plasticity, but had trouble filtering out irrelevant information, suggesting that their learning was not as stable.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: David Orenstein
david_orenstein@brown.edu
401-863-1862
Brown University

Showing releases 76-100 out of 305.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 > >>