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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 76-100 out of 473.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 > >>

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Nature
Chamber of secrets
Cells can huddle to communicate within a restricted group, scientists at EMBL Heidelberg have found. The study is the first demonstration that the way cells organize themselves influences their ability to communicate. The researchers propose that this strategy, which they discovered in developing zebrafish, could be much more widespread, influencing processes like wound repair, organ formation and even cancer.

Contact: Sonia Furtado Neves
sonia.furtado@embl.de
European Molecular Biology Laboratory

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Industrial and Engineering Chemistry Research
Waste, an alternative source of energy to petroleum
The group led by Martín Olazar, researcher in the UPV/EHU's Department of Chemical Engineering, is studying the development of sustainable refineries where it is possible to produce fuels and raw materials providing an alternative to petroleum by using biomass and other waste materials like plastics, tires, etc. Conical spouted beds are the key to the high energy efficiency of these refineries.

Contact: Matxalen Sotillo
komunikazioa@ehu.es
34-688-673-770
University of the Basque Country

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
PLOS ONE
How ferns adapted to one of Earth's newest and most extreme environments
How ferns adapted to the extreme environmental conditions found in the high Andean mountains of South America is the focus of new research by the universities of Bristol and Sheffield, published today in PLOS ONE.

Contact: Hannah Johnson
hannah.johnson@bristol.ac.uk
44-117-928-8896
University of Bristol

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Technology
RF heating of magnetic nanoparticles improves the thawing of cryopreserved biomaterials
Successful techniques for cryopreserving bulk biomaterials and organ systems would transform current approaches to transplantation and regenerative medicine. However, while vitrified cryopreservation holds great promise, practical application has been limited to smaller systems (cells and thin tissues) due to diffusive heat and mass transfer limitations, which are typically manifested as devitrification and cracking failures during thaw. Here we leverage a clinically proven technology platform, in magnetically heated nanoparticles, to overcome this major hurdle limiting further advancement in the field of cryopreservation.

Contact: Philly Lim
mllim@wspc.com
65-646-65775
World Scientific

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Science
Bristol team creates designer 'barrel' proteins
Designer proteins that expand on nature's own repertoire, created by a team of chemists and biochemists from the University of Bristol, UK, are described in a paper published this week in Science.

Contact: Hannah Johnson
hannah.johnson@bristol.ac.uk
44-117-928-8896
University of Bristol

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Journal of Astronomical Instrumentation
Researchers highlight acousto-optic tunable filter technology for balloon-borne platforms
A balloon-borne acousto-optic tunable filter hyperspectral imager is ideally suited to address numerous outstanding questions in planetary science. Their spectral agility, narrowband wavelength selection, tolerance to the near-space environment, and spectral coverage would enable investigations not feasible from the ground. Example use cases include synoptic observations of clouds on Venus and the giant planets, studies of molecular emissions from cometary comae, the mapping of surface ices on small bodies, and polarimetry.

Contact: Philly Lim
mllim@wspc.com
65-646-65775
World Scientific

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Fungal Biology
Herbal medicines could contain dangerous levels of toxic mold
Herbal medicines such as licorice, Indian rennet and opium poppy, are at risk of contamination with toxic mold, according to a new study published in Fungal Biology. The authors of the study, from the University of Peshawar, Pakistan say it's time for regulators to control mold contamination.

Contact: Sacha Boucherie
s.boucherie@elsevier.com
31-204-853-564
Elsevier

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Dissertations and Features
Retaining forests where raptors nest can help to protect biodiversity
Raptors can affect the distribution of other species and they can also be used to find forests with high biodiversity value.

Contact: Daniel Burgas i Riera
daniel.burgasriera@helsinki.fi
358-442-117-122
University of Helsinki

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Science
Berkeley Lab study reveals molecular structure of water at gold electrodes
Berkeley Lab researchers have recorded the first observations of the molecular structure of liquid water at a gold electrode under different battery charging conditions.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Rachel Berkowitz
rberkowitz@lbl.gov
510-486-7254
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Lancet Infectious Diseases
Without swift influx of substantial aid, Ebola epidemic in Africa poised to explode
The Ebola virus disease epidemic already devastating swaths of West Africa will likely get far worse in the coming weeks and months unless international commitments are significantly and immediately increased, new research led by Yale researchers predicts.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Karen N. Peart
karen.peart@yale.edu
203-432-1345
Yale University

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Cell Reports
New insight on why people with Down syndrome invariably develop Alzheimer's disease
Researchers discover the cell events in the brains of individuals with Down syndrome that lead to the amyloid pathology observed in the brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease. The findings support a novel approach to treating and preventing both diseases.
National Institutes of Health, Alzheimer's Association, Global Down Syndrome Foundation, American Assistance Foundation

Contact: Susan Gammon
sgammon@sanfordburnham.org
858-795-5012
Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Science
Florida lizards evolve rapidly, within 15 years and 20 generations
Scientists working on islands in Florida have documented the rapid evolution of a native lizard species -- in as little as 15 years -- as a result of pressure from an invading lizard species, introduced from Cuba.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation

Contact: Christine Sinatra
christine.sinatra@austin.utexas.edu
512-853-0506
University of Texas at Austin

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Cell
YEATS protein potential therapeutic target for cancer
Federal Express and UPS are no match for the human body when it comes to distribution. There exists in cancer biology an impressive packaging and delivery system that influences whether your body will develop cancer or not.
Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas, American Cancer Society, National Basic Research Program of China, Program for New Century Excellent Talents in University, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Center for Cancer Epigenetics

Contact: Ron Gilmore
rlgilmore1@mdanderson.org
713-745-1898
University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Science
Highest altitude archaeological sites in the world explored in the Peruvian Andes
Research conducted at the highest-altitude Pleistocene archaeological sites yet identified in the world sheds new light on the capacity of humans to survive in extreme environments. The findings, to be published in the Oct. 24 edition of the academic journal Science -- co-authored by a team of researchers including University of Calgary archaeologist Sonia Zarrillo -- were taken from sites in the Pucuncho Basin, located in the Southern Peruvian Andes.

Contact: Heath McCoy
hjmccoy@ucalgary.ca
403-220-5089
University of Calgary

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
PLOS Genetics
Genetic causes underlying the disqualification of 2 elite American Standardbred pacers
A DNA mutation that can lead to horses being genetically male, but female in appearance, may explain at least two cases of controversial sexual identity, according to research led by professors from the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences and published in PLOS Genetics.
Texas Agrilife Research, LINK Endowment, American Quarter Horse Association, University of Adelaide, China Scholarship Council

Contact: Terje Raudsepp
TRaudsepp@cvm.tamu.edu
PLOS

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
PLOS Genetics
Cutting the ties that bind
The development of a new organism from the joining of two single cells is a carefully orchestrated endeavor. But even before sperm meets egg, an equally elaborate set of choreographed steps must occur to ensure successful sexual reproduction. Those steps, known as reproductive cell division or meiosis, split the original number of chromosomes in half so that offspring will inherit half their genetic material from one parent and half from the other.
Stowers Institute for Medical Research, American Cancer Society

Contact: Kim Bland
ksb@stowers.org
816-926-4015
Stowers Institute for Medical Research

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Music therapy reduces depression in children and adolescents
Researchers at Queen's University Belfast have discovered that music therapy reduces depression in children and adolescents with behavioural and emotional problems.

Contact: Claire O'Callaghan
c.ocallaghan@qub.ac.uk
Queen's University Belfast

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
IARU Sustainability Science Congress
New policymaking tool for shift to renewable energy
Multiple pathways exist to a low greenhouse gas future, all involving increased efficiency and a dramatic shift in energy supply away from fossil fuels. A new tool 'SWITCH' enables policymakers and planners to assess the economic and environmental implications of different energy scenarios. It is presented today at the congress Global Challenges: Achieving Sustainability, hosted by the University of Copenhagen.

Contact: Elisabeth Wulffeld
elisabethw@snm.ku.dk
45-21-17-91-40
Faculty of Science - University of Copenhagen

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Lancet
The Lancet: The hidden truth about the health of homeless people
As many as 4 million Europeans and 3.5 million Americans experience homelessness every year, and the numbers are rising. Homeless people 'are the sickest in our society,' but just treating ill health might not be enough to help get people off the streets, according to a new two-part series on homelessness in high-income countries, published in The Lancet.

Contact: Caroline Brogan
c.brogan@lancet.com
The Lancet

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
Time for change -- additional daylight saving could improve public health
New research published just before the end of UK daylight saving shows that proposals to permanently increase the hours of waking daylight could have real impacts on public health. The study led by the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine shows that having later sunsets leads to an increase in children's physical activity. Over 23,000 children were studied in nine countries, with researchers examining associations between time of sunset and activity levels, measured via accelerometers.
National Institute for Health Research, UK National Prevention Research Initiative

Contact: Press Office
press@lshtm.ac.uk
44-207-927-2802
London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Lancet Infectious Diseases
The Lancet Infectious Diseases: Study predicts that current international commitments will not contain Ebola outbreak in Montserrado, Liberia
New modeling research, published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases journal, has found that the number of Ebola treatment center beds and other measures needed to control the epidemic in Montserrado County, Liberia substantially exceeds the total pledged by the international community to date.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Caroline Brogan
c.brogan@lancet.com
The Lancet

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Journal of Pediatrics
New test could identify infants with rare insulin disease
A rare form of a devastating disease which causes low blood sugar levels in babies and infants may now be recognised earlier thanks to a new test developed by researchers from The University of Manchester.
National Institute for Health Research Manchester Biomedical Research Centre grant, Research Councils UK

Contact: Morwenna Grills
Morwenna.Grills@manchester.ac.uk
44-016-127-52111
University of Manchester

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Science
Flu viruses disguised as waste
Disguising itself as waste, the shell of the flu virus is torn apart by the cell's own disposal system, thereby releasing viral genetic information. For the first time, a research team headed by researchers at ETH Zurich has now managed to show the exact process.

Contact: Ari Helenius
ari.helenius@bc.biol.ethz.ch
41-446-326-817
ETH Zurich

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Science
Top marine scientists call for action on 'invisible' fisheries
To protect our oceans from irreversible harm, governments, conservationists, and researchers around the world must address the enormous threat posed by unregulated and destructive fisheries, say top marine scientists.

Contact: Tyler Stiem
t.stiem@projectseahorse.org
604-827-5142
University of British Columbia

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
PLOS Genetics
Scientists uncover how protein ensures reproductive success
An international team of researchers from Japan and the UK has discovered how a single protein, called PP4, oversees the processing of DNA during sperm and egg generation for successful fertilization. This protein's activity becomes even more paramount during aging. The study, published in the journal PLOS Genetics, may one day help scientists to understand the mechanisms underlying age-related fertility declines in humans.

Contact: Peter Gee
pr@icems.kyoto-u.ac.jp
81-075-753-9755
Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences, Kyoto University

Showing releases 76-100 out of 473.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 > >>