Science For Kids
Kid Friendly News & Resources
Science for Kids
More News
Free Games
AAAS Resources
Talk Back
Also...
Science Magazine
EurekAlert! Kids Portal
EurekAlert!


Science for Kids RSS feed  RSS

Breaking News

Showing stories 226-250 out of 556 stories.
<< < 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 > >>

26-Nov-2009
Detecting gamma-rays from a microquasar
A microquasar happens when a normal star begins shedding its matter onto either a neutron star or a black hole. This phenomenon produces large amounts of radiation and "jets" of material moving at relativistic speeds -- more than 10 percent the speed of light -- away from the star.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

19-Nov-2009
The disappearance of mammoths and mastodons
For years, researchers have believed that large prehistoric creatures like mammoths and mastodons went extinct due to human hunters and changes in their environment. Some researchers also proposed that a meteor could have contributed to their extinction as well. But, new research published in the journal Science shows that those large prehistoric creatures disappeared from the Earth several thousands of years before all of that happened.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

12-Nov-2009
Measuring Greenland's ice loss
Greenland has tons of ice. The Greenland ice sheet covers about 80 percent of the country, and it's the second largest ice sheet in the world, after the Antarctic ice sheet.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

5-Nov-2009
Handling the horse genome
Researchers have successfully sequenced the horse genome, and they say it sheds light on how the creatures were domesticated long ago. They also say the newly sequenced genome shows many similarities to the genomes of other mammals, like cows. It even has some things in common with the human genome!

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

29-Oct-2009
Preventing an electronic wasteland
The toxic waste created from discarded electronic devices, like old cell phones and mp3 players, can be very harmful to people and to the environment -- and the United States need to take action now in order to prevent the problem from getting out of hand, researchers say.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

22-Oct-2009
For some algae, it pays to be little
Climate-driven changes to the Arctic Ocean are making "ecological winners" out of the small guys in the region, the tiny, marine algae called picoplankton, scientists have found. These itsy bitsy organisms are less than 2 micrometers across, smaller than the naked eye can see.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

15-Oct-2009
From thought to speech in 600 milliseconds
If a biologist wants to know how something in the human body works, one of the best ways to do this is to study the same process in other animals. But, what about language? We're the only animals who talk!

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

8-Oct-2009
Asteroid 2 Pallas, a wannabe planet
One of the largest members of the main asteroid belt, a grapefruit-shaped rock called 2 Pallas, has more in common with planets than asteroids, researchers report.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

1-Oct-2009
Algae was quick to recover
About 65 million years ago, an asteroid struck the Earth and disrupted ecosystems around the world. Many of the creatures on the planet then died off and went extinct. This traumatic event is known as the K-T boundary or the K-T extinction event.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

24-Sep-2009
Watching eels cross the ocean
It is extremely difficult to track the movements of individual fish in the ocean -- but it seems that scientists are getting closer to that goal. This week in the journal Science, a team of researchers report that they have successfully followed a group of European eels during the first 800 miles of a long, 3,100-mile migration.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

17-Sep-2009
A tiny T. Rex with typical traits
When you think of Tyrannosaurus rex, you probably imagine a fearsome predator with a large skull and tiny forearms attached to a tremendous body. But, researchers have just unearthed a much smaller version of this prehistoric dinosaur in China, and it's no more than three meters tall.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

10-Sep-2009
Constant climate change in the Arctic
The region of Earth surrounding the North Pole is known as the Arctic, and researchers say that rapid climate change is disturbing the ecosystems there at a very rapid pace. Across all kinds of ecosystems in the Arctic -- on land, in fresh water, and in salt water -- life is changing dramatically.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

3-Sep-2009
A very recent break from a long, cool trend
About 2,000 years ago, researchers say that the Arctic began cooling off -- and that cooling trend lasted all the way up to the 20th century. But, recently, the pattern of cooling in the Arctic has reversed, they say.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

27-Aug-2009
Dog coats shed genetic secrets
The differences between the silky curls of a cocker spaniel and the shaggy mop of a sheepdog are the result of a mere three genes, researchers report in a new study.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

20-Aug-2009
Bombs away! A deep sea worm's defense
Researchers have discovered several new species of deep-sea worms that let loose tiny balloon-like structures, which start to glow a brilliant green as soon as they detach from the worms' bodies.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

13-Aug-2009
Following the leader -- to friendship
For years, researchers have associated imitation among human beings -- copying another's actions -- with positive social behavior, like cooperation and friendship. Imitating others' actions is a way to connect with them, and to communicate our likeness to or affection for that person. Now, researchers have found that capuchin monkeys, a highly social species of monkey, often repay imitation with friendship as well.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

6-Aug-2009
DNA does yoga
Researchers have figured out how to make DNA bend and twist into a variety of new shapes. These curvy new molecules could someday be used to build nanoscale devices -- smaller than the width of a human hair -- for delivering drugs inside the body, growing new tissues or studying single proteins.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

30-Jul-2009
Native oysters, back in the Chesapeake
After many years of effort, a team of researchers has finally been able to restore native oysters to their home in the Chesapeake Bay, Va.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

23-Jul-2009
Who can figure out the toucan? You can!
The toco toucan's bill occupies a special place in the hall of animal oddities. Making up about one-third of the bird's total body length, it's the largest bill of any bird, compared to its owner's body size. Scientists have puzzled for centuries over the bill's possible purpose. Might be used for attracting mates? Maybe for manipulating fruit?

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

16-Jul-2009
Moths use sonar to foil bat attacks
Researchers have found that a particular species of tiger moth is able to escape from attacking bats by jamming their sonar with sudden bursts of the moths' own ultrasound. This new discovery adds to the long list of defense mechanisms that insects use against bats.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

9-Jul-2009
How the turtle got its shell
In their earliest stages as embryos, turtles, chickens, mice, and even humans all look pretty much the same -- big head, tiny arms, long spine that looks like a tail. By the time they hatch, however, turtles have taken a major detour and developed shells on their backs.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

2-Jul-2009
Exploring the layer of ice at Mars' north pole
NASA's Phoenix mission landed on the planet Mars in May 2008, and explored the surface of the Red Planet for more than five months. New data from the Phoenix Mars Lander confirms that there is a layer of ice water at the Martian north pole -- about five to 18 centimeters beneath the soil.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

29-Jun-2009
AAAS: 10 science books to help your kids avoid summer brain drain
In time for summer vacation, the American Association for the Advancement of Science has released a summer reading list of 10 science books for children ages 10-14, or grades 4-8. The books include stories on bioluminescent creatures, excavations from colonial-era settlements, and women who trained for space flight. Malcomson's list also includes activity books, such as a bird watching guide and a book containing tips on how to be "green".

Contact: Molly McElroy
mmcelroy@aaas.org
202-326-6434
American Association for the Advancement of Science

25-Jun-2009
Fish ears and ocean chemistry
In environments with high carbon dioxide levels, researchers say that the ear bones of young fish actually grow larger than normal -- rather than smaller, as they had expected. This finding means that ocean chemistry could have unexpected effects on the minerals produced by fish larvae.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

18-Jun-2009
Plant fossils shed light on extinction
Plant fossils from Greenland tell us that the number of plants there decreased abruptly about 200 million years ago, when the Triassic period ended and the Jurassic period began, researchers say in the latest issue of Science.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Showing stories 226-250 out of 556 stories.
<< < 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 > >>





Funding provided by the William T. Golden Endowment Fund for Program Innovation at AAAS.