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Showing stories 226-250 out of 574 stories.
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7-Apr-2010
If smoky lungs could talk: A tale of cancer
The lungs in your body have special ways of letting you know when they aren't healthy; especially if you smoke cigarettes. Recently, researchers have found that telltale chemical reactions in the lungs of current or former smokers can help identify those at highest risk for developing lung cancer.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

1-Apr-2010
Flower power
March 20 was the first day of spring. But, flowering plants can't read calendars, so how do they know it's time to start blooming? They get a signal from a protein called APETALA1, or "AP1" -- actually, as a new study shows, they get a whole bunch of signals. It turns out the signaling system that tells flowering plants to bloom is much more complex than we had thought.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

25-Mar-2010
An older, southern Tyrannosaur
Large tyrannosaurs, such as T. rex, were the top predators during the Late Cretaceous period, about 100 million to 65 million years ago -- but their history is not well documented for the 100 million years before that, and until now, their bones had only been found in the northern hemisphere.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

18-Mar-2010
A closer look at Saturn and its rings
The Cassini spacecraft was launched into space by NASA, the European Space Agency, and the Italian Space Agency. This international space mission reached Saturn almost six years ago, and it has been collecting data from the planet ever since. Now, researchers are learning more than ever about Saturn, and Cassini's detailed observations are bringing the planet into clearer focus than ever before.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

11-Mar-2010
Struggling for power: Canary chicks and their mothers
Recently, a group of researchers explored how parents and their offspring communicate with each other -- before and after the offspring's birth -- and now, their results are shedding light on the complicated give-and-take relationship between a mother bird and her chick.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

4-Mar-2010
Why are mussels' muscles so strong?
Marine mussels attach themselves to rocky seashores with strong fibers they produce, called byssal threads. Despite the constant motions of the tide -- pushing and pulling the mussels in different directions -- the byssal threads remain strong, yet stretchable at the same time. For researchers, this combination of physical properties is very attractive, and understanding how the mussels form these byssal threads might even improve industrial materials for humans in the future.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

25-Feb-2010
A detailed map of marine microorganisms
Microscopic organisms are the primary producers in the world's oceans, and their activities influence many of the Earth's processes. Now, a new study shows exactly how some important microscopic marine plants are distributed around the globe.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

18-Feb-2010
The appearance of whales on Earth
Whales are the largest creatures on Earth today, but new research in Science is showing how the evolution of these humongous marine mammals was linked to the evolution of some of the planet's smallest marine organisms tens of millions of years ago.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

11-Feb-2010
Glaciers may grow and shrink faster than expected
During the last ice age, the world's sea level fell by approximately 130 meters. For about 100,000 years, it dropped -- but not smoothly -- with a series of small spikes back up along the way. Now, new research shows that the world's sea level 81,000 years ago was actually more than a meter higher than it is today.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

4-Feb-2010
Colors of a feathered dinosaur
Ever tried to draw a dinosaur? What colors would you choose? The only limits are your imagination. Although paleontologists can use fossils to tell us how dinosaurs were built, bones can't tell us about what the dinosaurs looked like on the surface. Or can they?

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

28-Jan-2010
New dinosaur from China illuminates dino-bird link
Scientists have discovered a new member of a peculiar group of dinosaurs, the long-legged, stubby-armed alvarezsauroids. This one, found in China, is 63 million years older than other known members of this group, making it an important early member of the lineage that includes birds and their closest dinosaur relatives.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

21-Jan-2010
What can we learn from a slime mold?
Recent research suggests that human engineers could learn a lot from the lowly slime mold, known as Physarum polycephalum. It seems that the gelatinous, fungus-like mold might actually lead the way to more reliable computer and mobile communication networks in the future.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

14-Jan-2010
Why migrating birds go the distance
Arctic shorebirds travel grueling distances each year as they migrate to their breeding grounds in the harsh, remote Arctic, but they do get a payoff, scientists report in a new study. The birds' eggs are less like to be eaten by foxes and other predators.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

7-Jan-2010
Cleaner fish and third-party punishment
Recently, a study of cleaner fish revealed how males will punish females for bad behavior -- even when they seem to be bystanders, and are not personally affected by the females.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

31-Dec-2009
Masquerading animals aim to fool
Many birds enjoy snacking on caterpillars, but the caterpillars of Brimstone and Early Thorn moths have a handy defense. Instead of looking like juicy, green treats, they resemble brown, knobby twigs.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

17-Dec-2009
Science announces the Breakthrough of the Year
At the end of each year, the writers and editors of Science reflect upon all the major scientific discoveries of the previous 12 months. They look for research that has answered major questions about how the universe works -- research that has paved the way for future discoveries -- and then they pick a "winner."

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

10-Dec-2009
Triassic dinosaur illuminates early dino evolution
A newly discovered, early dinosaur from New Mexico -- a two-legged carnivore that belongs to the same lineage that later produced T. rex -- suggests that the first dinosaurs spread widely around the world, perhaps originating from South America.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

3-Dec-2009
A deep-earth plumbing system beneath Hawaii
The Hawaiian islands have formed as the Earth's crust moves over a "hotspot" where magma is rising up to the surface. Scientists have debated over how this hotspot works and how deep into the Earth it reaches, but a new study may help clear things up.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

26-Nov-2009
Detecting gamma-rays from a microquasar
A microquasar happens when a normal star begins shedding its matter onto either a neutron star or a black hole. This phenomenon produces large amounts of radiation and "jets" of material moving at relativistic speeds -- more than 10 percent the speed of light -- away from the star.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

19-Nov-2009
The disappearance of mammoths and mastodons
For years, researchers have believed that large prehistoric creatures like mammoths and mastodons went extinct due to human hunters and changes in their environment. Some researchers also proposed that a meteor could have contributed to their extinction as well. But, new research published in the journal Science shows that those large prehistoric creatures disappeared from the Earth several thousands of years before all of that happened.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

12-Nov-2009
Measuring Greenland's ice loss
Greenland has tons of ice. The Greenland ice sheet covers about 80 percent of the country, and it's the second largest ice sheet in the world, after the Antarctic ice sheet.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

5-Nov-2009
Handling the horse genome
Researchers have successfully sequenced the horse genome, and they say it sheds light on how the creatures were domesticated long ago. They also say the newly sequenced genome shows many similarities to the genomes of other mammals, like cows. It even has some things in common with the human genome!

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

29-Oct-2009
Preventing an electronic wasteland
The toxic waste created from discarded electronic devices, like old cell phones and mp3 players, can be very harmful to people and to the environment -- and the United States need to take action now in order to prevent the problem from getting out of hand, researchers say.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

22-Oct-2009
For some algae, it pays to be little
Climate-driven changes to the Arctic Ocean are making "ecological winners" out of the small guys in the region, the tiny, marine algae called picoplankton, scientists have found. These itsy bitsy organisms are less than 2 micrometers across, smaller than the naked eye can see.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

15-Oct-2009
From thought to speech in 600 milliseconds
If a biologist wants to know how something in the human body works, one of the best ways to do this is to study the same process in other animals. But, what about language? We're the only animals who talk!

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Showing stories 226-250 out of 574 stories.
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Funding provided by the William T. Golden Endowment Fund for Program Innovation at AAAS.