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Showing stories 376-400 out of 577 stories.
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31-May-2007
Walking lessons from orangutans
In the typical picture of human evolution, a gorilla- or chimp-like ape, dragging its knuckles on the ground, gradually straightens up and turns into a modern human standing on two legs.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

24-May-2007
The amazing baby brain
If you were watching television with the sound turned off, do you think you could tell what language the actors were speaking in? Babies can, according to new research. At least, they can tell whether a face is speaking their native language or a foreign language.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

17-May-2007
You won't hear this Nemo on American Idol
While the animated fish Nemo talks, real clownfish aren't ready to appear on the television show American Idol. The real Nemos -- clownfish -- only make "chirps" and "pops." Upon hearing it, Simon would say "that's ghastly."

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

10-May-2007
Bat flight secrets revealed
Scientists have discovered how bats' wing motions help them stay in the air. The research shows that bats and birds use their wings quite differently.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

3-May-2007
Mercury's core issues
The inside of the tiny planet Mercury has long been a mystery, but scientists have now begun to solve it. A new study shows that the Mercury's core is at least partially liquid, or "molten," just like Earth's core is.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

26-Apr-2007
Marine snow measured in the twilight zone
Researchers measuring the amount of carbon that passes through the ocean's "twilight zone," found striking differences from two areas in the Pacific Ocean that could have a large effect on calculations of the amount of carbon stored in the deep ocean. An international team of researchers led by Ken Buesseler developed a new tool to accurately measure the carbon in the twilight zone, and used the tool to study the twilight zone near Hawaii and in the northwest Pacific Ocean.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

19-Apr-2007
Whole lotta shaking goin' on in space
Researchers studied high-resolution photos of the near-Earth asteroid Itokawa and learned that its surface -- which is made up of small grains and boulders -- has been sorted when the asteroid was shaken.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

12-Apr-2007
New form of information from T. rex and Mastodon fossils
After discovering a giant T. rex leg bone fossil in Montana, back in 2003, a team of scientists had a problem: It wouldn't fit in their helicopter. When they broke the fossil open in order to fit the pieces inside, this led to a shocking discovery.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

5-Apr-2007
Sizing up man's best friend
Have you ever wondered why dogs come in such diverse sizes? When they are on their hind legs, the toy dogs may just reach up to your knee. The giant dogs can easily push you over and are more than 7 feet tall!

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

29-Mar-2007
Can coral survive in a warmer world?
One likely effect of global warming is that the oceans will absorb more carbon dioxide and become a little more acidic. Humans probably wouldn't notice the change when they went swimming, but it would make a big difference to many corals.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6657
American Association for the Advancement of Science

22-Mar-2007
Scientists discover the oldest known chunk of Earth's crust
An international team of scientists has found a group of rocks in Greenland that formed as the sea floor split apart 3.8 billion years ago, which means that this is the oldest known chunk of the Earth's crust. But, if it formed on the seafloor, what's it doing in Greenland?

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

15-Mar-2007
Radar reveals Martian Pole's icy underside
A radar instrument took images of Mars' south pole and found very pure water ice and lots of it. There is so much water that if it were spread evenly over the planet it would be about 11 meters thick, or 36 feet deep.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

8-Mar-2007
Introducing the sala-bot: A salamander-like robot shows how swimmers can be walkers
Around 400 million years ago, vertebrate animals first ventured from the ocean onto land. How did those first fishy explorers figure out how to walk on solid ground? A new salamander-like robot may provide some answers.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

1-Mar-2007
The mystery of the Thirteen Towers of Chankillo
Thirteen towers march from north to south along the top of a low hill in the coastal Peruvian desert. These towers -- spread over 300 meters -- are part of a fourth-century BCE ceremonial complex in a remote location in Peru's Casma-Sechin River Basin.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

22-Feb-2007
Medieval Islamic architects were math whizzes
The walls of many ancient buildings in the Islamic world are covered in designs that are mind-bogglingly complex. A new study now helps explain how the designers managed to make such intricate patterns.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

15-Feb-2007
Elk change physiology when hunted by wolves
The wolves of the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem affect elk in important ways besides making meals of them, researchers have found.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

8-Feb-2007
Secrets of moth flight control
Ever tried taking a drink during a bumpy airplane or car ride? Some of it probably ended up on the front of your shirt. Now imagine being a moth trying to drink nectar from a flower on a windy day. If you want that nectar to end up in your gut, you're going to need a way to stay steady while you're in flight.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

1-Feb-2007
More time tells a different story about plants and climate change
Ecologists studying the effects of climate change on a California grassland, found that observing the interactions between plants and insects over five years, provides better information than one- or two-year-long studies on a single plant or insect.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

25-Jan-2007
Jumping spiders glow in ultraviolet light
Under ultraviolet (UV) light, body parts of the ornate jumping spider Cosmophasis umbratica fluoresce, and excite the opposite sex's mating interest.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

18-Jan-2007
What animal is whiter than the whitest smile?
Every now and then, scientists discover that nature has produced a much better version of something they are trying to make themselves. A team of researchers in the UK has just made this kind of discovery about the white Cyphochilus beetle.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

11-Jan-2007
Family found for giant, stinking flower
First discovered nearly 200 years ago in the Sumatran rain forest, an unusual flowering plant with the largest single flower -- typically a full meter across and weighs up to 15 pounds -- has finally found its home in the botanical tree of life.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

4-Jan-2007
Anchovy fishing could harm Patagonian penguins
In the movie "Happy Feet," Mumbles the emperor penguin discovers that overfishing by humans is causing a famine in the penguin colony in Antarctica. If we're not careful, a similar type of situation (minus the tap-dancing) could take place on the Patagonian coast of Argentina, researchers say.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

21-Dec-2006
Giant European dinosaur found in Spain
Fossils of a giant Sauropod, found in Spain, reveal that Europe was home to giant dinosaurs in the Late Jurassic period -- about 150 million years ago. Giant dinosaurs have previously been found mainly in the New World and Africa.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

14-Dec-2006
Stardust surprise -- Comet dust is mixed and varied
Researchers have only been able to speculate about the material in comets until now. The recent NASA mission brought the first samples to Earth from a comet.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

6-Dec-2006
Brand new craters and gullies on Mars
The Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft has been orbiting Mars for the last nine years, and its camera has been snapping photos of the Red Planet's surface all the while.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Showing stories 376-400 out of 577 stories.
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Funding provided by the William T. Golden Endowment Fund for Program Innovation at AAAS.