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Showing stories 401-425 out of 578 stories.
<< < 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 > >>


6-Dec-2006
Brand new craters and gullies on Mars
The Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft has been orbiting Mars for the last nine years, and its camera has been snapping photos of the Red Planet's surface all the while.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

30-Nov-2006
Can ancient forests help slow climate warming?
The trees in the Dinghushan Biosphere Reserve, which is in China’s Guangdong Province are really old. As in 400 years old!

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

23-Nov-2006
Saving the animals of the serengeti
How do you keep wildlife in a nature preserve safe and healthy when people want to kill them for food or to sell valuable animal parts to make money?

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

16-Nov-2006
Resilient robots
Researchers have designed a robot that can sense and recover from damage to its own body, an ability that should help robots operate in new or dangerous terrain.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

9-Nov-2006
What can a sea urchin tell us about having a backbone?
Scientists have begun to unravel the genome -- the chemical instructions for life contained in an organism's every cell -- for the purple sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

2-Nov-2006
Seafood and fish are disappearing from the sea
Seafood and fish species loss is accelerating, and if things continue this way, researchers say their studies show we may have no more fish or seafood to eat from the ocean.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

26-Oct-2006
The buzz on bees: Oldest bee fossil found
Scientists reported finding the oldest fossil of a honey bee. It is 100 million years old. This fossil is about 40 millions years older than ones found before.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

19-Oct-2006
Cosmic rays go along for the Milky Way ride
Cosmic rays zoom through our galaxy near the speed of light. These streams of high energy particles may be accelerated in shock waves such as supernova blast waves, but theirs paths are scrambled by interstellar magnetic fields, making it difficult to determine where they came from.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

12-Oct-2006
If asteroids got dizzy
Then near-Earth asteroid 1999 KW4 would be about to lose its lunch right now. Scientists have discovered that the main piece of this asteroid, whose name is "Alpha," is spinning so fast that it would break apart if it went any faster. Alpha also has a little buddy named "Beta." Beta is revolving around its own axis, but it also circles around Alpha. That's a lot of spinning!

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

5-Oct-2006
Shell fossils tell life came out of the tropics
Researchers studied 11 million years worth of shell fossils and learned that the tropics are where new types of life -- called species -- begin and old species continue to live.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

28-Sep-2006
Parasite plants 'sniff' out their new homes
"Witches' shoelaces," "hairweed," "devils hair," "devilguts": These are all nicknames for the dodder plant, which winds around other plants and sucks out nutrients and water. Large numbers of dodder plants looks like a big tangle of hair smothering their host plants.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

21-Sep-2006
Why sleep? Flies tell us why
Sleep is a mystery. Scientists do not know why we need sleep. But, adults know they need sleep and parents know children need sleep. Other living beings need sleep.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

14-Sep-2006
Oldest writing in the new world
While digging in a gravel quarry in Mexico, workers found a stone block that researchers believe has the oldest writing in the New World carved into it.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

7-Sep-2006
Opportunity Rover on Mars keeps going and going
Imagine having a robot with a transformer-like tool that you can send to a distant planet. It could send back photos so you could see that planet's landscape and provide you information about the rocks it finds because the transformer can open up rocks and test what is inside.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

31-Aug-2006
Race, stereotypes and school performance
A 15-minute writing exercise at the beginning of the seventh-grade school year improved African-American students' grades at the end of the semester, researchers report.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

24-Aug-2006
Nibbled leaf fossils and prehistoric bugs
If you give the same kind of pizza to a group of kids, some kids might just eat the cheese, some might pick off the pepperoni, others might leave the crusts. Afterward, the plates of leftovers would look pretty different from each other.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

17-Aug-2006
The Hubble Telescope lets astronomers see deeply into stars
Summer is a great time to sit outside and watch the heavens. The sky is full of stars. You can see planets and constellations if you know when and where to look.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

10-Aug-2006
Mussels grow a thick skin against a crab bully
"Grow thicker skin" is what people tell us when a bully bothers us. Atlantic mussels are even taking the advice and doing so quickly.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

3-Aug-2006
Super-stretchy blood clot fibers
Even though blood is a liquid, when you cut yourself, something amazing happens. Special proteins in your blood link together in chains, forming solid fibers that work their way into a net. This net catches red blood cells, and, voila, you have a blood clot that stops the bleeding.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

27-Jul-2006
A natural snake-bite antidote?
Snake bites and bee stings can be either painful or downright deadly, depending on which species is doing the biting, and sometimes whether the person being bitten is allergic to the venom.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

20-Jul-2006
Losing the bees and the flowers
What would a world without bees be like? Well, picnics would be easier -- no bee stings to worry about -- but it would a lot harder to fill that picnic basket. The plants that produce many of our fruits and vegetables depend on bees for pollination. So do plants that give us beautiful wildflowers and food for livestock.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

13-Jul-2006
School's in for meerkats
OK, we know that it's the middle of summer and you don't want to think about school yet. But just think of how exciting school would be if one of your classes were all about catching scorpions! That's one of the things young meerkats learn from their teachers, say Alex Thornton and Katherine McAuliffe of the University of Cambridge in the United Kingdom.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

6-Jul-2006
Were mammoths blondes and brunettes?
In most illustrations of ice-age animals, the huge, shaggy mammoths are just plain brown. But if you are doing your own illustration and want to mix things up a little, science may be on your side. Researchers have made a discovery that makes them think mammoths might have come in both light and dark colors.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

29-Jun-2006
Teenagerhood, age of opportunity
Many decades ago, the word "teenager" didn't exist. Growing up pretty much meant that you went from being a child to an adult. But, around the 1950s, people began thinking of teenagerhood as its own stage of life, midway between being a kid and a grownup.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

22-Jun-2006
Sticky spider web caught bugs millions of years ago
Have you ever touched a spider's web? If you have, you know they are sticky but also pretty easy to break. It's hard to believe a spider's web could last for millions of years, but one web did. Scientists from Spain and the United States say they found a 110-million spider web that still has bug parts sticking to it.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Showing stories 401-425 out of 578 stories.
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Funding provided by the William T. Golden Endowment Fund for Program Innovation at AAAS.