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Showing stories 426-450 out of 570 stories.
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20-Apr-2006
Antarctica's hula hoop of water
Hula hoops are big, light-weight, circular toys made to swing around your waist -- if you move your hips just right.

Contact: AAAS Office of Public Programs
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

13-Apr-2006
If you can't take the heat, get away from the deep sea vent!
Ever take a nice, hot bath that felt so good, you didn't want to get out, no matter how pruney you got? Deep-sea worms called P. sulfincola feel the same way.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

6-Apr-2006
Ants in your pants
Ant, ants, ants in your pants. Ants, ants, crawling over flowering plants. Long, long ago when dinosaurs still had a chance, ants and flowering plants may have done quite a dance. Not the waltz, not the polka, Not to techno or to go-go. If you want some answers to these rhymes, keep on reading, it won't take much time.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

30-Mar-2006
When did wheat farming get trendy?
Computers, video cameras, the Internet and cell phones have all had their moment as "the cool new thing." Thousands of years ago, farming was the cool new thing for some groups of people. Now, scientists are trying to figure out when and where wheat farming got its start.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

23-Mar-2006
Let's get ready to rumble!
If the great sheets of ice on Greenland could talk, they might be saying "Let's Get Ready to Rumble!!!!!"

Contact: AAAS Office of Public Programs
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

16-Mar-2006
Inside grasshopper poop
Grasshopper poop, grasshopper poop, fruit seeds are inside grasshopper poop.

Contact: Office of Public Programs
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

9-Mar-2006
Icy volcano on saturn's moon
Saturn is a planet that almost everyone knows about--it's the one with the pretty stripes and all the rings. Last year a little spaceship about the size of a short school bus flew really close to one of Saturn's moons called Enceladus. The spaceship Cassini was packed with lots of tools to help scientists get a good look at the faraway moon.

Contact: Office of Public Programs
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

2-Mar-2006
Chimps try to help
How many people have you helped today? Did you help your brother find his shoes before school? Did you lend a pencil to your best friend in math class? Did you help your soccer coach put away the balls after practice? If you did, you must be a human. Humans are some of the most helpful animals around. We lend a hand to our family, our friends, sometimes even strangers. Other animals aren't even close to being that helpful--or are they?

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

23-Feb-2006
A beaver buddy for the dinosaurs?
Wouldn't it be cool to go back in time and see what things looked like 164 million years ago? Those were the days of the dinosaurs, which is why scientists digging in China were so surprised when they found a new animal fossil from that time that looks a lot like a beaver!

Contact: Scipak Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

16-Feb-2006
Facing a tough decision? Forget about it
The best way to make a tough decision is to collect the information you need and then forget about it.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

9-Feb-2006
For tomatoes, yummy means healthy
Can a tomato taste healthy? That's what some scientists think. They wonder if maybe the flavors of a tomato or a strawberry give us little clues about the vitamins and other healthy stuff inside, according to a study in the 10 February issue of the journal Science.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

2-Feb-2006
Find far fish fast
In May of 2003, scientists recorded tens of millions of fish swimming around in one loosely connected group in the Atlantic Ocean not so far from New York City. That's a lot of fish to keep track of at the same time. In fact, that's the most fish, and maybe the most creatures that have ever been instantaneously "caught on film."

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

26-Jan-2006
Tracking cougars with a virus bug
What if your mom could tell where you'd been and who you'd been hanging out with after school, just by checking to see who else in your neighborhood also had the nasty cold you caught last week? That's the kind of snooping some scientists did recently when they wanted to know where cougars were living and roaming around in the western United States and Canada.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

19-Jan-2006
'Gut feeling' geometry
Kids and adults who have probably never seen a ruler or talked about triangles, rectangles or parallel lines have a reliable "gut feeling" about geometry, according to a new study.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

12-Jan-2006
It's raining natural gas
On Saturn's biggest moon, infrequent but heavy downpours of liquid natural gas have created steep-sided valleys and flushed icy debris and dark goo into shallow lakes.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

5-Jan-2006
Farming ants run microbe motels
The ants that grow fungus in little gardens face a problem that is well known to human farmers pests. Scientists have just discovered that farming ants are covered in little "motel rooms" that serve as shelter for bacteria that protect their crops.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

22-Dec-2005
Water in the trunk of a tree
Every December, people cut down pine trees and other evergreens and stick them in their houses. The trees start sucking up water right away (unless you wait too long between cutting the tree and putting it in water, of course). A new study helps to explain how the heck water moves up the trunk of cone-making trees called "conifers."

Contact: Science Press Package
202-326-6400
American Association for the Advancement of Science

15-Dec-2005
Aquarium fish and human skin color
Zebrafish, tiny aquarium fish with stripes on their sides, have helped scientists explain in terms of genetic makeup the variety of colors that human skin comes in.

Contact: Science Press Package
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

8-Dec-2005
When did 'pet rocks' and 'wild rocks' become cool?
"Pet rocks" became cool in 1975 -- they suddenly seemed like the perfect low-maintenance pet, and almost instantly, people were buying pet rocks like crazy. You could teach a pet rock to sit and play dead instantly!

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

1-Dec-2005
Earliest bird had dino-like feet
A new fossil discovery shows that the earliest birds had feet similar to those of theropod dinosaurs (the group of two-legged, meat-eating dinosaurs that includes T. rex). The new specimen provides important details about the feet and skull of these birds and strengthens the argument -- which many but not all scientists agree on -- that modern birds arose from theropod dinosaurs.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

24-Nov-2005
New 'time machine' from ice
Thanks to air bubbles trapped in a long cylinder of ice from a glacier in Antarctica, scientists have jumped an extra 210,000 years back in time. This scientific "time machine" now tells us how much carbon dioxide and methane was in the air as far back as 650,000 years ago.

Contact: Science press package
scipak@aaas.org
American Association for the Advancement of Science

17-Nov-2005
What do butterfly wings and TV screens have in common?
Many of the gadgets we use every day work by controlling the movement of light waves. CD and DVD players use lasers to read information off disks, allowing us to listen to music or watch movies. Optical fibers carry information signals long distances, in the form of light, allowing telephones and other devices to "talk" to each other.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

10-Nov-2005
Europe's first farmers
People migrating from the Middle East brought farming techniques to present-day Germany and other parts of central Europe about 7,500 years ago. For years, scientists have been arguing over whether people with European ancestors are closely related to these first farmers. Some scientists say yes. Others say no and argue instead that people with European roots are closely related to the humans who lived in Europe long before the first farmers showed up.

Contact: Science press package
scipak@aaas.org
American Association for the Advancement of Science

3-Nov-2005
Words versus sentences
It's pretty easy to tell the difference between a word and a sentence. But how your brain works when it reads a word versus how it works when it reads a sentence is still a mystery.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

27-Oct-2005
Trees protected villages from tsunami waves
In India, trees growing along the coastline helped to protect villages from the "walls of water" or tsunami waves that were triggered by a powerful earthquake that struck beneath the Indian Ocean on 26 December 2004, scientists have discovered.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Showing stories 426-450 out of 570 stories.
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Funding provided by the William T. Golden Endowment Fund for Program Innovation at AAAS.