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Showing stories 426-450 out of 587 stories.
<< < 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 > >>


17-Aug-2006
The Hubble Telescope lets astronomers see deeply into stars
Summer is a great time to sit outside and watch the heavens. The sky is full of stars. You can see planets and constellations if you know when and where to look.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

10-Aug-2006
Mussels grow a thick skin against a crab bully
"Grow thicker skin" is what people tell us when a bully bothers us. Atlantic mussels are even taking the advice and doing so quickly.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

3-Aug-2006
Super-stretchy blood clot fibers
Even though blood is a liquid, when you cut yourself, something amazing happens. Special proteins in your blood link together in chains, forming solid fibers that work their way into a net. This net catches red blood cells, and, voila, you have a blood clot that stops the bleeding.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

27-Jul-2006
A natural snake-bite antidote?
Snake bites and bee stings can be either painful or downright deadly, depending on which species is doing the biting, and sometimes whether the person being bitten is allergic to the venom.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

20-Jul-2006
Losing the bees and the flowers
What would a world without bees be like? Well, picnics would be easier -- no bee stings to worry about -- but it would a lot harder to fill that picnic basket. The plants that produce many of our fruits and vegetables depend on bees for pollination. So do plants that give us beautiful wildflowers and food for livestock.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

13-Jul-2006
School's in for meerkats
OK, we know that it's the middle of summer and you don't want to think about school yet. But just think of how exciting school would be if one of your classes were all about catching scorpions! That's one of the things young meerkats learn from their teachers, say Alex Thornton and Katherine McAuliffe of the University of Cambridge in the United Kingdom.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

6-Jul-2006
Were mammoths blondes and brunettes?
In most illustrations of ice-age animals, the huge, shaggy mammoths are just plain brown. But if you are doing your own illustration and want to mix things up a little, science may be on your side. Researchers have made a discovery that makes them think mammoths might have come in both light and dark colors.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

29-Jun-2006
Teenagerhood, age of opportunity
Many decades ago, the word "teenager" didn't exist. Growing up pretty much meant that you went from being a child to an adult. But, around the 1950s, people began thinking of teenagerhood as its own stage of life, midway between being a kid and a grownup.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

22-Jun-2006
Sticky spider web caught bugs millions of years ago
Have you ever touched a spider's web? If you have, you know they are sticky but also pretty easy to break. It's hard to believe a spider's web could last for millions of years, but one web did. Scientists from Spain and the United States say they found a 110-million spider web that still has bug parts sticking to it.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

15-Jun-2006
Digging up the super great-granddaddy of ducks
There were lots of dinosaurs in China 110 million years ago, but did you know that there were also lots of birds? Some of these birds looked like feathered dinosaurs, but some of them looked a lot like birds we see flying around today. This week, scientists from China and the United States will show the world some very old fossils of a bird called Gansus that might have been the super-great-granddaddy of ducks.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

8-Jun-2006
A step toward robots with a human touch
What if you could build a robot someday whose hands had a sense of touch like human hands do? Maybe this ability would help robots tie shoes or build a house of cards -- or perform surgery in the hospital.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

1-Jun-2006
A sea otter-shaped rubble pile in space
True to its name, the Japanese spacecraft Hayabusa, which means "falcon" in Japanese, hovered over the near-Earth asteroid Itokawa last fall, taking up-close measurements and photographs. Then it swooped down for a brief landing and the first-ever sample attempt on an asteroid.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

25-May-2006
What do you want to be when you grow up?
What do you want to be when you grow up? Do you want to be an astronaut? Or perhaps you want to be a doctor or nurse? Or even a biology teacher? According to researchers, eighth graders who are interested in math and science are more likely to major in a science when they go to college.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

18-May-2006
Do apes plan ahead?
When you pack your suitcase for a trip to the beach this summer, what kinds of stuff will you bring?

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

11-May-2006
New name for a monkey
In 2005, scientists reported the discovery a new kind of African monkey. Now, about a year later, some of the same scientists are saying that the monkey needs a new name.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

4-May-2006
Sand on Titan, Saturn's largest moon
The planet Saturn has a moon named Titan, and on this moon, scientists have discovered long and tall rows of sand that look just like sand dunes in the Sahara desert, as well as other deserts in Africa, Australia and Arabia.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

27-Apr-2006
The ancient secret of an olive tree
The Greek island of Santorini is now a picturesque place with beautiful beaches, steep cliffs and blue waters. At one point during the second millennium BC, it was the site of a massive volcanic eruption that blasted ash and rock for many miles around, burying many thriving civilizations in the Mediterranean.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

20-Apr-2006
Antarctica's hula hoop of water
Hula hoops are big, light-weight, circular toys made to swing around your waist -- if you move your hips just right.

Contact: AAAS Office of Public Programs
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

13-Apr-2006
If you can't take the heat, get away from the deep sea vent!
Ever take a nice, hot bath that felt so good, you didn't want to get out, no matter how pruney you got? Deep-sea worms called P. sulfincola feel the same way.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

6-Apr-2006
Ants in your pants
Ant, ants, ants in your pants. Ants, ants, crawling over flowering plants. Long, long ago when dinosaurs still had a chance, ants and flowering plants may have done quite a dance. Not the waltz, not the polka, Not to techno or to go-go. If you want some answers to these rhymes, keep on reading, it won't take much time.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

30-Mar-2006
When did wheat farming get trendy?
Computers, video cameras, the Internet and cell phones have all had their moment as "the cool new thing." Thousands of years ago, farming was the cool new thing for some groups of people. Now, scientists are trying to figure out when and where wheat farming got its start.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

23-Mar-2006
Let's get ready to rumble!
If the great sheets of ice on Greenland could talk, they might be saying "Let's Get Ready to Rumble!!!!!"

Contact: AAAS Office of Public Programs
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

16-Mar-2006
Inside grasshopper poop
Grasshopper poop, grasshopper poop, fruit seeds are inside grasshopper poop.

Contact: Office of Public Programs
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

9-Mar-2006
Icy volcano on saturn's moon
Saturn is a planet that almost everyone knows about--it's the one with the pretty stripes and all the rings. Last year a little spaceship about the size of a short school bus flew really close to one of Saturn's moons called Enceladus. The spaceship Cassini was packed with lots of tools to help scientists get a good look at the faraway moon.

Contact: Office of Public Programs
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

2-Mar-2006
Chimps try to help
How many people have you helped today? Did you help your brother find his shoes before school? Did you lend a pencil to your best friend in math class? Did you help your soccer coach put away the balls after practice? If you did, you must be a human. Humans are some of the most helpful animals around. We lend a hand to our family, our friends, sometimes even strangers. Other animals aren't even close to being that helpful--or are they?

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Showing stories 426-450 out of 587 stories.
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Funding provided by the William T. Golden Endowment Fund for Program Innovation at AAAS.