Science For Kids
Kid Friendly News & Resources
Science for Kids
More News
Free Games
AAAS Resources
Talk Back
Also...
Science Magazine
EurekAlert! Kids Portal
EurekAlert!


Science for Kids RSS feed  RSS

Breaking News

Showing stories 451-475 out of 574 stories.
<< < 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 > >>

17-Nov-2005
What do butterfly wings and TV screens have in common?
Many of the gadgets we use every day work by controlling the movement of light waves. CD and DVD players use lasers to read information off disks, allowing us to listen to music or watch movies. Optical fibers carry information signals long distances, in the form of light, allowing telephones and other devices to "talk" to each other.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

10-Nov-2005
Europe's first farmers
People migrating from the Middle East brought farming techniques to present-day Germany and other parts of central Europe about 7,500 years ago. For years, scientists have been arguing over whether people with European ancestors are closely related to these first farmers. Some scientists say yes. Others say no Ė and argue instead that people with European roots are closely related to the humans who lived in Europe long before the first farmers showed up.

Contact: Science press package
scipak@aaas.org
American Association for the Advancement of Science

3-Nov-2005
Words versus sentences
It's pretty easy to tell the difference between a word and a sentence. But how your brain works when it reads a word versus how it works when it reads a sentence is still a mystery.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

27-Oct-2005
Trees protected villages from tsunami waves
In India, trees growing along the coastline helped to protect villages from the "walls of water" or tsunami waves that were triggered by a powerful earthquake that struck beneath the Indian Ocean on 26 December 2004, scientists have discovered.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

20-Oct-2005
Logging, a bigger threat to the rainforest than we knew
The amount of land in the Amazon rainforest that's being damaged by human activities is twice as large as we had previously thought, suggests a new study. That's because researchers didn't have a good idea of how much logging was occurring there, until now.

Contact: Science press package
scipak@aaas.org
American Association for the Advancement of Science

13-Oct-2005
Green ocean machine
The plants in the window, the trees outside and the broccoli in the refrigerator all have ancient ancestors that didn't used to be green. They only "got green" when they captured smaller green creatures that turn sunlight into food. These small green creatures eventually became the green "chloroplasts" that the plants use to capture energy from the sun through the process of photosynthesis.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

6-Oct-2005
Great White shark swims laps in the ocean
A great white shark swam across the Indian Ocean twice in nine months. The female shark swam from South Africa to Australia and then back to South Africa, according to a new study.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

29-Sep-2005
Why good grooming matters for birds
Once barn swallows have chosen their mates for the season, the females may not stay faithful if their males don't keep themselves looking sexy, new research shows.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

22-Sep-2005
Cicadas star in award-winning movie
"Look at the weird goo sloshing around their eye things!" exclaimed a young viewer of a short film about the massive U.S. cicada invasion of summer 2004. This movie has just won first prize in the Non-Interactive Media category of the 2005 Science & Engineering Visualization Challenge.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

15-Sep-2005
If the moon didnít get chicken pox, then
Scars that look like miniature moon craters on your skin are not normally a mystery: a childhood case of the chicken pox is often responsible. What caused the craters on the moon, Mars, Earth, Venus and Mercury is not so obvious. In fact, this "whodunnit" is one of the mysteries of astronomy.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

8-Sep-2005
Generate electricity while you walk
Scientists have invented a backpack that collects electricity when you walk. This electricity could power a flashlight, a cell phone, night vision goggles, a water purifier, or a combination of these and other electronics all at the same time.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

1-Sep-2005
Learning about humans by watching chimps
If you've ever looked into the intelligent eyes of a chimpanzee at the zoo, you may have had the feeling that this animal was looking back at you with the same type of curiosity. Our two species have many similarities. We find creative ways to solve problems. We nurture and make each other feel better. We're also capable of being bullies.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

25-Aug-2005
Climate change scientists take to the trees
Like climbing trees? Not afraid of heights? Climate change researchers might have a job for you some day.

Contact: Science press package
scipak@aaas.org
American Association for the Advancement of Science

18-Aug-2005
See-through ribbons are stronger than steel and much more versatile
Imagine rolling your TV up and putting in your backpack to take with you somewhere. Or pressing a button on a snowy day and having all the snow melt quickly from your windows. These possibilities may become real before long, thanks to a bunch of long, bendy molecules called "carbon nanotubes."

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
American Association for the Advancement of Science

11-Aug-2005
Knotted strings, not written records, for the ancient Inkans
For decades, archeologists exploring the remains of the Inkan empire, an ancient civilization in western South America, have found mysterious clusters of knotted strings called "khipu." Because they are so common, khipu appear to be quite important, but what do they mean and what were they used for?

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

4-Aug-2005
Waves taller than a 10-floor building
Ninety foot waves that would snap a ship in two and dwarf a 10-floor building rose from the stormy waters of the Gulf of Mexico in 2004 during Hurricane Ivan, according to new research.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

28-Jul-2005
Eggs tell story of baby dinosaurs' first steps
Scientists have discovered fossilized eggs containing developing dinosaurs that probably started out moving around on all four limbs before learning to walk only on only two legs -- kind of like people.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

21-Jul-2005
Flesh-eating caterpillar spins deadly silk
In Hawaiian rainforests, scientists have discovered tiny caterpillars "gluing" snails to leaves with silk webbing and then feasting on snail flesh, leaving nothing but empty shells.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

14-Jul-2005
Special delivery: How seabirds bring pollution to the Arctic
The arctic landscape is beautifully pristine. You won't see many factories, highways or other signs of industrial civilization. So why do researchers keep finding high levels of pollution there?

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

7-Jul-2005
Blind sea creature hunts with a light
The deep sea is a seriously dark place, so when a light shows up, even a tiny one, fish will swim up for a closer look. That seems to be the strategy behind the glowing red spots used by a relative of the jellyfish, called Erenna. Scientists have just discovered that these creatures have glowing red dots in their tentacles, which are probably used to lure fishy prey.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
American Association for the Advancement of Science

30-Jun-2005
Fluorescent bird poop haiku
Grass paths guide bluebirds. Fluorescent bird poop tells all. Corridor works, Yay! The fluorescent bird poop Haiku above, with its 5-7-5 syllable pattern, is almost as precisely structured as new research aimed at understanding how bluebirds move through grasslands and pine forest.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

24-Jun-2005
Bird code: what chickadees are really saying to each other
When a tiny chickadee songbird spots an owl, hawk, or other predator perched nearby, it makes a warning call that sounds like its name ("chick-a-dee-dee-dee"). Other chickadees within earshot then swarm together and mob the predator, usually harassing it so that it flies away.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
American Association for the Advancement of Science

16-Jun-2005
Carrying stuff on your head in the Himalayas
If you think hiking for an afternoon is a lot of work, imagine hiking for a week while carrying a pack from your head that weighs almost as much as you do.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

9-Jun-2005
Mucus balloons solve an ocean mystery
Some tadpole-sized ocean animals live in houses made of almost the very same stuff that leaks out of your nose when you have a cold. As researchers have just discovered, these mucus houses help solve the mystery of how creatures at the bottom of the ocean get enough food.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

2-Jun-2005
How to tell if a dinosaur fossil is from a male or female
Scientists studying a Tyrannosaurus rex fossil have figured out that the dinosaur was a female. How could they tell just by looking at preserved bones?

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Showing stories 451-475 out of 574 stories.
<< < 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 > >>





Funding provided by the William T. Golden Endowment Fund for Program Innovation at AAAS.