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Showing stories 476-500 out of 587 stories.
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25-Aug-2005
Climate change scientists take to the trees
Like climbing trees? Not afraid of heights? Climate change researchers might have a job for you some day.

Contact: Science press package
scipak@aaas.org
American Association for the Advancement of Science

18-Aug-2005
See-through ribbons are stronger than steel and much more versatile
Imagine rolling your TV up and putting in your backpack to take with you somewhere. Or pressing a button on a snowy day and having all the snow melt quickly from your windows. These possibilities may become real before long, thanks to a bunch of long, bendy molecules called "carbon nanotubes."

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
American Association for the Advancement of Science

11-Aug-2005
Knotted strings, not written records, for the ancient Inkans
For decades, archeologists exploring the remains of the Inkan empire, an ancient civilization in western South America, have found mysterious clusters of knotted strings called "khipu." Because they are so common, khipu appear to be quite important, but what do they mean and what were they used for?

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

4-Aug-2005
Waves taller than a 10-floor building
Ninety foot waves that would snap a ship in two and dwarf a 10-floor building rose from the stormy waters of the Gulf of Mexico in 2004 during Hurricane Ivan, according to new research.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

28-Jul-2005
Eggs tell story of baby dinosaurs' first steps
Scientists have discovered fossilized eggs containing developing dinosaurs that probably started out moving around on all four limbs before learning to walk only on only two legs -- kind of like people.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

21-Jul-2005
Flesh-eating caterpillar spins deadly silk
In Hawaiian rainforests, scientists have discovered tiny caterpillars "gluing" snails to leaves with silk webbing and then feasting on snail flesh, leaving nothing but empty shells.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

14-Jul-2005
Special delivery: How seabirds bring pollution to the Arctic
The arctic landscape is beautifully pristine. You won't see many factories, highways or other signs of industrial civilization. So why do researchers keep finding high levels of pollution there?

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

7-Jul-2005
Blind sea creature hunts with a light
The deep sea is a seriously dark place, so when a light shows up, even a tiny one, fish will swim up for a closer look. That seems to be the strategy behind the glowing red spots used by a relative of the jellyfish, called Erenna. Scientists have just discovered that these creatures have glowing red dots in their tentacles, which are probably used to lure fishy prey.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
American Association for the Advancement of Science

30-Jun-2005
Fluorescent bird poop haiku
Grass paths guide bluebirds. Fluorescent bird poop tells all. Corridor works, Yay! The fluorescent bird poop Haiku above, with its 5-7-5 syllable pattern, is almost as precisely structured as new research aimed at understanding how bluebirds move through grasslands and pine forest.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

24-Jun-2005
Bird code: what chickadees are really saying to each other
When a tiny chickadee songbird spots an owl, hawk, or other predator perched nearby, it makes a warning call that sounds like its name ("chick-a-dee-dee-dee"). Other chickadees within earshot then swarm together and mob the predator, usually harassing it so that it flies away.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
American Association for the Advancement of Science

16-Jun-2005
Carrying stuff on your head in the Himalayas
If you think hiking for an afternoon is a lot of work, imagine hiking for a week while carrying a pack from your head that weighs almost as much as you do.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

9-Jun-2005
Mucus balloons solve an ocean mystery
Some tadpole-sized ocean animals live in houses made of almost the very same stuff that leaks out of your nose when you have a cold. As researchers have just discovered, these mucus houses help solve the mystery of how creatures at the bottom of the ocean get enough food.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

2-Jun-2005
How to tell if a dinosaur fossil is from a male or female
Scientists studying a Tyrannosaurus rex fossil have figured out that the dinosaur was a female. How could they tell just by looking at preserved bones?

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

26-May-2005
How Venus flytraps work
Without muscles to help them, some plants and fungi move rapidly to shake off predators, spread their seeds or slap pollen on visiting insects, and new research helps describe these quick moves.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

19-May-2005
New monkey in Africa
Scientists have discovered a new kind of monkey living in the rainforests of the African country of Tanzania, called the "highland mangabey."

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

12-May-2005
Young canaries sing surprising songs
It's easy to get little kids to say something funny like "Big Bird is the President of the United States" because they don't know what the sentence means. They just repeat the sounds.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

5-May-2005
Fish TV and a new way to swim
How do tiny sea creatures, many only one-tenth the size of a grain of rice, stay together to form the dense patches that whales and other creatures rely on for food? Why don't these crowded groupings of animals break up by sinking deep or floating to the surface?

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

28-Apr-2005
How an uninvited bird guest fools its hosts
When a female Horsfield's hawk-cuckoo lays an egg, she leaves it in the nest of other birds, where the chick will be raised by foster parents. Animals have many different strategies for survival, and the hawk-cuckoo chick's isn't particularly kind. It pushes the other baby birds out of the nest, so that it can receive all the attention from its foster parents.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

21-Apr-2005
Taste test for ants
Scientists put a bunch of ants through a taste test. No. The scientists didn't taste the ants. The ants did the tasting. The ants wandered around an "ant cafeteria" where they could eat any of the natural or artificial sweet foods they wanted.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

14-Apr-2005
Dinosaur eggs discovered inside mother
Scientists have discovered a dinosaur that died right before it laid two eggs. Finding dinosaur eggs inside the female, in almost the same position they were in when she died, might answer some tough questions about dinosaur egg-laying.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

7-Apr-2005
How real Nemos find their way home
A coral reef is an extremely loud place. The sounds of snapping shrimp claws, grinding fish teeth and other fish noises can be heard from kilometers away.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

31-Mar-2005
Termite-eating mammals lived with dinosaurs
When dinosaurs roamed the earth, termite-eating, chipmunk-sized, warm-blooded animals roamed as well, according to the scientists who report the discovery of the new termite-eater.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

24-Mar-2005
A surprise inside a T. Rex fossil
When scientists looked inside the leg bone of a recently discovered Tyrannosaurus rex fossil, they found something they weren't expecting. Typically, only the hard parts of an animal, like the bones, are preserved as fossils. This T. rex fossil, however, contained some beautifully preserved soft tissue inside the bone, where the marrow once was.

Contact: Scipak
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

17-Mar-2005
'Protein police' search your food
When you eat beans and rice, you make the "protein police" in your brain happy because you are eating a meal that supplies the ingredients your body needs to make proteins. These protein ingredients are called "amino acids."

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

10-Mar-2005
From wild boars to pigs
Imagine that Porky Pig has Italian cousins named "Paolo Pig" and "Piera Pig" who love both science and pig history.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Showing stories 476-500 out of 587 stories.
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Funding provided by the William T. Golden Endowment Fund for Program Innovation at AAAS.