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Showing stories 51-75 out of 579 stories.
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3-Oct-2013
Sponges recycle resources for the reef
For years, researchers have tried to explain how coral reef communities -- some of the most productive ecosystems in the world -- can thrive in waters that don't have any nutrients. Somehow, these diverse ecosystems can grow very well in the marine equivalents of a desert -- a mystery that has become known as "Darwin's Paradox."

Contact: Science Press Package Team
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

26-Sep-2013
Neurons that make us eat too much?
Researchers have found a circuit in the mouse brain that makes the rodents eat even when they aren't hungry. And the same brain circuit prevents the mice from eating when they are hungry, they say. This network of neurons involves a region of the brain called the lateral hypothalamus, or LH, which controls some behaviors, like eating, and the researchers suggest that it might lead to new treatments for eating disorders and obesity in humans.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

19-Sep-2013
Arms in the gas of the Coma cluster
X-ray readings from the center of one of the nearest galaxy clusters, the Coma cluster, suggest that the clashing of gas particles expected throughout the cluster interior doesn't happen in the very center, a new study in the journal Science reports. There, the gas calms down enough to allow particles brought to the core from other galaxy clusters to stay intact.

Contact: Science Press Package Team
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

12-Sep-2013
Gears 'invented' by insects, not humans
Sometimes scientists study nature to learn new engineering tricks -- like the researchers who modeled the wing beats of flies to create tiny, flying robots. But, other times, scientists are surprised to learn that so-called "human inventions" have already existed in nature for a long time -- like the classic screw-and-nut-system, which existed in the legs of beetles long before we humans dreamt it up.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

5-Sep-2013
To save species, more land needs protection
The Convention on Biological Diversity has set two goals -- among many others -- to be accomplished by 2020. They involve protecting 17 percent of the planet's land surface and conserving 60 percent of the plant species on such protected land. But, lately, researchers have wondered if both goals can be met at the same time.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

29-Aug-2013
Old birds help teach younger birds to migrate
Many birds migrate thousands of miles each year to reach their breeding grounds. But how do they know where to go? For years, scientists have wondered how much of a bird's migration route is learned from experience -- and how much is passed on genetically. Now, researchers studying North American whooping cranes find that old birds help younger to stay on track and keep flying in a straight line to their destinations. So, social learning among whooping cranes is important, they say.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

22-Aug-2013
To fly, bees use a familiar mechanism
Researchers studying bumblebees -- and the specialized muscles that the insects use for flight -- have made a surprising discovery: Bees have simply improved upon an ancient muscle-contraction mechanism that was first used by vertebrates, rather than developing a new one altogether.

Contact: Science Press Package Team
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

15-Aug-2013
The most successful mammal in history, unearthed
Researchers in China have discovered the 160-million-year-old fossil of an extinct rodent-like creature, which looked a bit like a small rat or a chipmunk. They are calling this newly discovered species Rugosodon eurasiaticus, and they say that it represents the oldest ancestor of a group of mammals called multituberculates, which lived on Earth for 100 million years before more modern rodents replaced them.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

8-Aug-2013
A closer look at DNA's loose ends
A new study published in the journal Science provides a first look at the events leading to rips and tears in our DNA. The particular method the study used also suggests a way to monitor DNA breaks in real time.

Contact: Science Press Package Team
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

29-Jul-2013
Understanding why male mammals choose to mate with just 1 female
A new study in Science reports that scientists are getting closer to understanding a question they've long debated: why some male mammals -- who could mate with several females -- stick to just one. The new study, with authors from the University of Cambridge, is one of the field's most extensive to date.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

25-Jul-2013
For diabetics, a way to bypass the bypass
A new study in the journal Science might help explain why obese individuals who undergo a special type of surgery to help reduce their weight are cured of diabetes in the process.

Contact: Science Press Package Team
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

18-Jul-2013
Lizards' lessons for life
If you could somehow hit "replay" on the history of life, what would happen? Would the animals we see in this replay version of Earth look the same as the animals we see now?

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

11-Jul-2013
Good news for gene therapy?
Gene therapy -- a process by which healthy "replacement" genes are infused into patients who have inherited faulty copies of the genes -- seems to work well in animal models of diseases. But, moving from animal research to the clinic has proved extremely challenging: The transplanted genes rarely express the right amount of proteins in human patients, and in some cases the treatment leads to negative side effects, like leukemia.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

4-Jul-2013
The origin of agriculture in the Fertile Crescent
Fossilized plant remains at an archaeological site in the foothills of the Zagros Mountains in Iran are telling researchers that the early inhabitants of the region began farming cereal grains, like barley and wheat, sometime between 12,000 and 9,800 years ago.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

27-Jun-2013
Class with Web-based and hands-on experiments wins Science prize
As a young student in Estonia, Margus Pedaste was very interested -- and quite brilliant -- in biology. When he was in the seventh grade, for instance, he conducted his first real research. And by the time he graduated from high school he had already won his country's annual biology "olympiad" three times.

Contact: Science Press Package Team
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

20-Jun-2013
Available now in 3-D: The world's most detailed brain map
Your brain's microscopic nooks and crannies are now on display in 3-D, offering scientists a priceless tool in their quest to better understand how brain shape contributes to human behavior and health.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

13-Jun-2013
Better oxygen storage deepens the dive
All mammals -- including you -- have oxygen-storing molecules, but deep-diving mammals like whales have adapted special versions of these molecules that let them hold their breaths for long periods, and a new study provides insight into just when this special capability evolved.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

6-Jun-2013
Birds of a colony eat together
Animals trying to determine where their feeding territory ends and the feeding territory of a competing animal nearby begins may be influenced just as much by signals they share with others in their colony as by spats and squabbles with members of competing colonies, reveals a new study in Science.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

5-Jun-2013
Science Books & Films suggests 10 top summer books for K-4 students
Ten great books for students in kindergarten through the fourth grade, suggested by Science Books & Films at the American Association for the Advancement of Science, promise to stimulate children's imaginations and help combat summer learning loss.

Contact: Ginger Pinholster
gpinhols@aaas.org
202-326-6421
American Association for the Advancement of Science

30-May-2013
Human activity echoes through the Brazilian rainforest
The disappearance of large, fruit-eating birds from tropical rainforests in Brazil has caused the forests' palm trees to produce smaller, weaker seeds over the past century, researchers say. The finding makes it clear that human activity can trigger fast-paced evolutionary changes in natural ecosystems.

Contact: Science Press Package Team
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

23-May-2013
Cockroaches outsmart sugary traps
A new study in the May 24 issue of Science reveals how cockroaches outsmart the sugary traps designed to catch and kill them.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

16-May-2013
Making tiny complex controlled shapes
A new study in the May 17 issue of Science reveals how to make minerals assemble themselves into complex but controlled architectures.

Contact: Science Press Package Team
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

9-May-2013
The secret lives of bubbles
A froth of soap suds, a handful of shaving cream or the mass of bubbles that sits on top of a freshly poured soda -- all of these things are foams or foam-like materials. They all have complex dynamics too, since the individual bubbles that make them up are constantly growing, popping and shape-shifting.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

2-May-2013
Robotic flies take to the skies
The common house-fly is one of nature's most agile fliers, capable of dodging flyswatters and carefully landing on flowers that are blowing in the wind. Now, researchers have designed a small, flying robot -- about the size of a house-fly -- that can execute the same tricky maneuvers.

Contact: Science Press Package Team
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

25-Apr-2013
Probing and proving gravity theory
Scientists have identified a neutron star, the densest kind of a star in the universe, which has helped them prove Einstein's theory of relativity in a place it's never been tested, a new study in Science reports.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Showing stories 51-75 out of 579 stories.
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Funding provided by the William T. Golden Endowment Fund for Program Innovation at AAAS.