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Showing stories 51-75 out of 569 stories.
<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 > >>

25-Jul-2013
For diabetics, a way to bypass the bypass
A new study in the journal Science might help explain why obese individuals who undergo a special type of surgery to help reduce their weight are cured of diabetes in the process.

Contact: Science Press Package Team
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

18-Jul-2013
Lizards' lessons for life
If you could somehow hit "replay" on the history of life, what would happen? Would the animals we see in this replay version of Earth look the same as the animals we see now?

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

11-Jul-2013
Good news for gene therapy?
Gene therapy -- a process by which healthy "replacement" genes are infused into patients who have inherited faulty copies of the genes -- seems to work well in animal models of diseases. But, moving from animal research to the clinic has proved extremely challenging: The transplanted genes rarely express the right amount of proteins in human patients, and in some cases the treatment leads to negative side effects, like leukemia.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

4-Jul-2013
The origin of agriculture in the Fertile Crescent
Fossilized plant remains at an archaeological site in the foothills of the Zagros Mountains in Iran are telling researchers that the early inhabitants of the region began farming cereal grains, like barley and wheat, sometime between 12,000 and 9,800 years ago.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

27-Jun-2013
Class with Web-based and hands-on experiments wins Science prize
As a young student in Estonia, Margus Pedaste was very interested -- and quite brilliant -- in biology. When he was in the seventh grade, for instance, he conducted his first real research. And by the time he graduated from high school he had already won his country's annual biology "olympiad" three times.

Contact: Science Press Package Team
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

20-Jun-2013
Available now in 3-D: The world's most detailed brain map
Your brain's microscopic nooks and crannies are now on display in 3-D, offering scientists a priceless tool in their quest to better understand how brain shape contributes to human behavior and health.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

13-Jun-2013
Better oxygen storage deepens the dive
All mammals -- including you -- have oxygen-storing molecules, but deep-diving mammals like whales have adapted special versions of these molecules that let them hold their breaths for long periods, and a new study provides insight into just when this special capability evolved.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

6-Jun-2013
Birds of a colony eat together
Animals trying to determine where their feeding territory ends and the feeding territory of a competing animal nearby begins may be influenced just as much by signals they share with others in their colony as by spats and squabbles with members of competing colonies, reveals a new study in Science.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

5-Jun-2013
Science Books & Films suggests 10 top summer books for K-4 students
Ten great books for students in kindergarten through the fourth grade, suggested by Science Books & Films at the American Association for the Advancement of Science, promise to stimulate children's imaginations and help combat summer learning loss.

Contact: Ginger Pinholster
gpinhols@aaas.org
202-326-6421
American Association for the Advancement of Science

30-May-2013
Human activity echoes through the Brazilian rainforest
The disappearance of large, fruit-eating birds from tropical rainforests in Brazil has caused the forests' palm trees to produce smaller, weaker seeds over the past century, researchers say. The finding makes it clear that human activity can trigger fast-paced evolutionary changes in natural ecosystems.

Contact: Science Press Package Team
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

23-May-2013
Cockroaches outsmart sugary traps
A new study in the May 24 issue of Science reveals how cockroaches outsmart the sugary traps designed to catch and kill them.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

16-May-2013
Making tiny complex controlled shapes
A new study in the May 17 issue of Science reveals how to make minerals assemble themselves into complex but controlled architectures.

Contact: Science Press Package Team
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

9-May-2013
The secret lives of bubbles
A froth of soap suds, a handful of shaving cream or the mass of bubbles that sits on top of a freshly poured soda -- all of these things are foams or foam-like materials. They all have complex dynamics too, since the individual bubbles that make them up are constantly growing, popping and shape-shifting.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

2-May-2013
Robotic flies take to the skies
The common house-fly is one of nature's most agile fliers, capable of dodging flyswatters and carefully landing on flowers that are blowing in the wind. Now, researchers have designed a small, flying robot -- about the size of a house-fly -- that can execute the same tricky maneuvers.

Contact: Science Press Package Team
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

25-Apr-2013
Probing and proving gravity theory
Scientists have identified a neutron star, the densest kind of a star in the universe, which has helped them prove Einstein's theory of relativity in a place it's never been tested, a new study in Science reports.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

18-Apr-2013
Stressful conditions help moms help their babies
Pregnant squirrels may be able to help their babies before they are born simply by living in a crowded place, a new study in the journal Science reports.

Contact: Science Press Package Team
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

11-Apr-2013
Shining a light into the brain
Researchers have figured out a way to insert tiny electronic devices that can detect and control light into the brains of rodents without harming the animals. Until now, similar devices, like light sources and sensors, have been safely placed upon the brain. But, inserting such electronics directly into brain tissue has caused serious damage and irritation.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

4-Apr-2013
Continent-wide look at vole populations
Climate may be affecting vole populations across Europe, a new study in the journal Science reports.

Contact: Science Press Package Team
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

28-Mar-2013
Termites behind desert 'fairy circles'
A new study uncovers the origin of fairy circles, circular patches of perennial grasses with a barren center that grow in the desert on the southwest coast of Africa. The research appears in the March 29, 2013, issue of the journal Science.

Contact: Science Press Package Team
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

21-Mar-2013
Taking robots off-roading
Researchers can learn a lot from a lizard scampering across the desert sand or an insect walking across some gravel, according to a new study. Chen Li and colleagues studied how objects move across these types of "flowable" surfaces and designed a six-legged robot that can do it easily.

Contact: Science Press Package Team
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

14-Mar-2013
Wings not lost, just hidden in some insects
The only limbs that can grow upon a modern insect's back are wings and wing-like structures, and they only appear on the second and third segments of an insect's thorax -- between their head and their abdomen. However, some insects in the fossil record seem to have wing-like "pads" on many of their non-winged body segments.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

7-Mar-2013
Prairie dogs take cooperation over competition
Why did the prairie dog cross the road? It might be because all of its close female relatives had already done so, according to a new study by John Hoogland. This researcher studied three different species of prairie dogs for more than 30 years and discovered that -- unlike many other animals -- prairie dogs tend to stay in the areas they are born until their close family members are gone.

Contact: Science Press Package Team
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

28-Feb-2013
For more food, we need wild bees
Wild insects pollinate food crops more effectively than managed honeybees, a new study appearing online in Science Express reports.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

21-Feb-2013
Watching tiny particles in a Finland forest
All over the world, tiny airborne particles from volcanoes, dust, pollution and other sources float around in the atmosphere. New field studies in a boreal forest in Hyytiälä, Finland, and laboratory experiments reveal how these tiny particles, called atmospheric aerosols, are formed from gas molecules, a new study appearing in the journal Science reports.

Contact: Science Press Package Team
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

14-Feb-2013
Does melting ice in the Arctic mean more algae?
Last year, Arctic sea ice fell to its lowest levels ever recorded. During that time, when the ice was the thinnest it had been in decades, scientists aboard the research vessel Polarstern found large amounts of an algae, known as Melosira arctica, growing under it.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Showing stories 51-75 out of 569 stories.
<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 > >>





Funding provided by the William T. Golden Endowment Fund for Program Innovation at AAAS.