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Showing stories 51-75 out of 591 stories.
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2-Jan-2014
Working up the nerve to mate
A new study in fish reports that a female's more likely to mate with a male she's seen than one she's not because certain nerve cells fire when she sees him again. The finding is reported in the Jan. 3 issue of the journal Science.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

19-Dec-2013
Where did cooperation come from?
Why do people (and animals) help each other? What's in it for them? It's a fundamental question that scientists have been asking for years -- and a new study in birds is helping to explain how the idea of cooperation first evolved in the animal kingdom.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

12-Dec-2013
Animal family tree trunk made of jelly
Just which critters sit at the base of the animal family tree has been unclear, but now a new study providing the first-ever genome sequence of an ancient jelly-like creature suggests that it represents the tree's first branch.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

5-Dec-2013
Deep-sea sampling explains large slip-up off Japan
It was the fault zone's fault that the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake in Japan was so big; the fault zone was too thin and too weak, reports a series of extraordinary ocean drilling studies.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

28-Nov-2013
Aging happens faster when more females are near
Historically, scientists haven't looked too closely at how a male's health or lifespan changes if he senses the presence of a female, or vice versa. But now a study by University of Michigan's Christi M. Gendron and colleagues published in the Nov. 29 issue of the journal Science does just that.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

21-Nov-2013
Icy detective discovers extraterrestrial particles
Sensors buried below the ice may help scientists figure out where the high-energy rays that speed through space are born, a new study reports. And this is exciting as the origin of these rays, known as cosmic rays, has long been mysterious -- because cosmic rays are hard to track.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

14-Nov-2013
Dogs went to finishing school -- in Europe
How were dangerous, man-eating wolves tamed to become the friendly, playful dogs we know and love today?

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

6-Nov-2013
The largest asteroid impact on Earth in a century
Earlier this year, on Feb. 15, an asteroid violently exploded above the city of Chelyabinsk, Russia. It caused the largest airburst, or explosion, on the planet since a similar event occurred back in 1908 (also in Russia). And since it happened in a heavily populated area, where cell phones, video cameras and other recording devices are common, researchers have been able to gather a tremendous amount of information about it.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

31-Oct-2013
Beyond rats: Bats reveal neurons' role in 3-D navigation
When Princeton University's Michael M. Yartsev chose to study how bats build mental maps of their whereabouts, he chose an animal model that would greatly expand neuroscientists' insights into the way the brain encodes space.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

24-Oct-2013
Grasshopper mice resist pain, thanks to evolution
Bark scorpions have one of the most painful stings in the animal kingdom -- but the grasshopper mouse doesn't know that. In fact, these rodents can get stung multiple times while they're eating bark scorpions, and they hardly even seem to notice! That's because grasshopper mice have evolved a unique kind of resistance to the scorpion's venom over the years, researchers say in Science.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

17-Oct-2013
The sly maneuvers of the fungus fatal to frogs
Like subsurface ninjas, the cells of a newly discovered fungus are slipping into the skins of frogs worldwide, killing them, and now a new study in the journal Science study hints at how.

Contact: Science Press Package Team
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

10-Oct-2013
The building blocks of a water-rich world?
One day in the very distant future, our sun will burn out and collapse. And whenever that happens, there's a fair chance that it will evolve into a white dwarf star -- a small but incredibly dense burned-out star. As a white dwarf star with tremendous gravity, our sun would begin stripping all of the elements away from the solar system's inner planets, sucking their mass onto itself like a stellar vacuum cleaner. That's how white dwarfs grow.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

3-Oct-2013
Sponges recycle resources for the reef
For years, researchers have tried to explain how coral reef communities -- some of the most productive ecosystems in the world -- can thrive in waters that don't have any nutrients. Somehow, these diverse ecosystems can grow very well in the marine equivalents of a desert -- a mystery that has become known as "Darwin's Paradox."

Contact: Science Press Package Team
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

26-Sep-2013
Neurons that make us eat too much?
Researchers have found a circuit in the mouse brain that makes the rodents eat even when they aren't hungry. And the same brain circuit prevents the mice from eating when they are hungry, they say. This network of neurons involves a region of the brain called the lateral hypothalamus, or LH, which controls some behaviors, like eating, and the researchers suggest that it might lead to new treatments for eating disorders and obesity in humans.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

19-Sep-2013
Arms in the gas of the Coma cluster
X-ray readings from the center of one of the nearest galaxy clusters, the Coma cluster, suggest that the clashing of gas particles expected throughout the cluster interior doesn't happen in the very center, a new study in the journal Science reports. There, the gas calms down enough to allow particles brought to the core from other galaxy clusters to stay intact.

Contact: Science Press Package Team
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

12-Sep-2013
Gears 'invented' by insects, not humans
Sometimes scientists study nature to learn new engineering tricks -- like the researchers who modeled the wing beats of flies to create tiny, flying robots. But, other times, scientists are surprised to learn that so-called "human inventions" have already existed in nature for a long time -- like the classic screw-and-nut-system, which existed in the legs of beetles long before we humans dreamt it up.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

5-Sep-2013
To save species, more land needs protection
The Convention on Biological Diversity has set two goals -- among many others -- to be accomplished by 2020. They involve protecting 17 percent of the planet's land surface and conserving 60 percent of the plant species on such protected land. But, lately, researchers have wondered if both goals can be met at the same time.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

29-Aug-2013
Old birds help teach younger birds to migrate
Many birds migrate thousands of miles each year to reach their breeding grounds. But how do they know where to go? For years, scientists have wondered how much of a bird's migration route is learned from experience -- and how much is passed on genetically. Now, researchers studying North American whooping cranes find that old birds help younger to stay on track and keep flying in a straight line to their destinations. So, social learning among whooping cranes is important, they say.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

22-Aug-2013
To fly, bees use a familiar mechanism
Researchers studying bumblebees -- and the specialized muscles that the insects use for flight -- have made a surprising discovery: Bees have simply improved upon an ancient muscle-contraction mechanism that was first used by vertebrates, rather than developing a new one altogether.

Contact: Science Press Package Team
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

15-Aug-2013
The most successful mammal in history, unearthed
Researchers in China have discovered the 160-million-year-old fossil of an extinct rodent-like creature, which looked a bit like a small rat or a chipmunk. They are calling this newly discovered species Rugosodon eurasiaticus, and they say that it represents the oldest ancestor of a group of mammals called multituberculates, which lived on Earth for 100 million years before more modern rodents replaced them.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

8-Aug-2013
A closer look at DNA's loose ends
A new study published in the journal Science provides a first look at the events leading to rips and tears in our DNA. The particular method the study used also suggests a way to monitor DNA breaks in real time.

Contact: Science Press Package Team
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

29-Jul-2013
Understanding why male mammals choose to mate with just 1 female
A new study in Science reports that scientists are getting closer to understanding a question they've long debated: why some male mammals -- who could mate with several females -- stick to just one. The new study, with authors from the University of Cambridge, is one of the field's most extensive to date.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

25-Jul-2013
For diabetics, a way to bypass the bypass
A new study in the journal Science might help explain why obese individuals who undergo a special type of surgery to help reduce their weight are cured of diabetes in the process.

Contact: Science Press Package Team
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

18-Jul-2013
Lizards' lessons for life
If you could somehow hit "replay" on the history of life, what would happen? Would the animals we see in this replay version of Earth look the same as the animals we see now?

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

11-Jul-2013
Good news for gene therapy?
Gene therapy -- a process by which healthy "replacement" genes are infused into patients who have inherited faulty copies of the genes -- seems to work well in animal models of diseases. But, moving from animal research to the clinic has proved extremely challenging: The transplanted genes rarely express the right amount of proteins in human patients, and in some cases the treatment leads to negative side effects, like leukemia.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Showing stories 51-75 out of 591 stories.
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Funding provided by the William T. Golden Endowment Fund for Program Innovation at AAAS.