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Showing stories 526-550 out of 578 stories.
<< < 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 > >>

2-Jul-2004
An early human skull from Africa
The early humans that lived around 2 million to 500,000 years ago may have come in a wide variety of shapes and sizes.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

25-Jun-2004
Honeybee air conditioning
Anyone whose air conditioner has broken down on a sweltering summer day should find it easy to appreciate the honeybee's do-it-yourself approach to temperature control.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

18-Jun-2004
How close can you get to a comet?
In January 2004, the Stardust spacecraft came breathlessly close to a comet named Wild 2.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

11-Jun-2004
A dog's 'vocabulary'
Rico, a German family's Border collie, can learn the names of toys the first time he encounters them.

Contact: Science Press Package
scpiak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

4-Jun-2004
Making sense of scents
New research is helping scientists understand how our brains are able to tell the difference between the scent of a rose and the stink of a sweat sock.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

28-May-2004
Scientists' moon bounce
The moon bounce is always popular at carnivals. In a new study, scientists report that a different kind of moon bounce -- one involving bouncing light, not bouncing feet -- may be important for scientists who study how Earth's climate works.

Contact: Science Press Package
scpiak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

21-May-2004
Purebred pooch genetics
Which dog do you think is more genetically similar to a wolf: a tough German Shepherd or a wrinkly-faced Shar-Pei?

Contact: Science Press Package
scpiak@aaas.org
202-346-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

14-May-2004
Paved paradise
Unlike the few dandelions that manage to pop through asphalt sidewalks, some ocean creatures seem to actually like asphalt.

Contact: Science Press Package
scpiak@aaas.org
202-346-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

7-May-2004
World's oldest hummingbirds
Hummingbirds in Europe? While the only hummingbirds you'll see flying around Europe these days have probably escaped from captivity, hummingbirds lived wild and free in present-day Germany and in other parts of Europe, Asia and Africa more than 30 million years ago.

Contact: Science Press Package
spiack@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

30-Apr-2004
The oldest known campfires?
While scientists don't have lyrics to any campfire songs, the burned seeds, wood, and flint they discovered in Israel could be the world's oldest known remains from fires controlled by humans.

Contact: Science Press Package
scpiak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

23-Apr-2004
A medicine in mustard?
Turmeric is a bright yellow spice that colors curry powder and the mustard we squirt on hotdogs.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

16-Apr-2004
Sunsets keep songbirds from getting lost
Night-migrating songbirds use sunsets to help them fly back and forth between winter feeding grounds in Central and South America to summer breeding grounds in North America.

Contact: Science Press Package
scpiak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

9-Apr-2004
Sea shells and blood cells
While stepping on a sharp shell may draw blood, new research links sea shells and blood cells in a totally different way.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

2-Apr-2004
Prehistoric push-ups
Scientists reporting the discovery of the world's oldest known arm bone say that the first arms and legs developed for use in the water.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

26-Mar-2004
Can bacteria be real estate agents?
Scientists found a strain of bacteria that live inside the bodies of tiny sap-sucking insects and act, in a way, like real estate agents.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-346-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

19-Mar-2004
What caused the 1930s dust bowl?
A severe drought parched the Great Plains during the 1930s, driving farmers off their land in search of work.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

12-Mar-2004
Bacteria and ocean celebrities
If you were a marine biologist and hoped to learn how to protect coral reefs, whales and other "ocean celebrities," you'd need to study bacteria.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

27-Feb-2004
What languages will the world speak in 50 years?
In fifty years, you might be searching for the coolest new fonts for Mandarin, Hindi and Arabic so you can communicate stylishly with people speaking the world's most common native languages.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-346-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

20-Feb-2004
Empathy and pain
When your parents punish you and say, "this hurts me as much as it hurts you," they might not be making it up. Feeling empathy activates some, but not all, of the pain-processing regions of the human brain, according to a new brain-scan study in the 20 February 2004 issue of the journal Science.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-346-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

13-Feb-2004
The geometry of M&M's
If you had two containers, one filled with M&M's and the other filled with M&M-sized gumballs, which container would hold more objects?

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-346-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

6-Feb-2004
Catapults -- popular science in ancient times
If you're ever caught launching a spoonful of mashed potatoes across the dining room table, you might argue that you're following in the footsteps of the ancient Greeks and Romans.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-346-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

30-Jan-2004
The not-so-big, bad Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus
If you were a bacterium, you wouldn't want to meet Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus in a dark alley.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

23-Jan-2004
Singing and dancing cowbird style
Cowbirds may be the ultimate Broadway performers - they synchronize their song and dance - and during certain moves, dancing makes the singing easier.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

16-Jan-2004
From plant genes to ice cream
If you've ever looked at the ingredients list on a carton of ice cream, you've probably spotted some weird items among the sugar, cream and eggs.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

9-Jan-2004
Inside a squid flashlight
The Hawaiian bobtail squid has a built-in flashlight on its underside which is beamed downward by stacks of silvery reflector plates which are made from an unusual family of proteins, according to new research.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-346-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Showing stories 526-550 out of 578 stories.
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Funding provided by the William T. Golden Endowment Fund for Program Innovation at AAAS.