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Showing stories 76-100 out of 582 stories.
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9-May-2013
The secret lives of bubbles
A froth of soap suds, a handful of shaving cream or the mass of bubbles that sits on top of a freshly poured soda -- all of these things are foams or foam-like materials. They all have complex dynamics too, since the individual bubbles that make them up are constantly growing, popping and shape-shifting.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

2-May-2013
Robotic flies take to the skies
The common house-fly is one of nature's most agile fliers, capable of dodging flyswatters and carefully landing on flowers that are blowing in the wind. Now, researchers have designed a small, flying robot -- about the size of a house-fly -- that can execute the same tricky maneuvers.

Contact: Science Press Package Team
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

25-Apr-2013
Probing and proving gravity theory
Scientists have identified a neutron star, the densest kind of a star in the universe, which has helped them prove Einstein's theory of relativity in a place it's never been tested, a new study in Science reports.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

18-Apr-2013
Stressful conditions help moms help their babies
Pregnant squirrels may be able to help their babies before they are born simply by living in a crowded place, a new study in the journal Science reports.

Contact: Science Press Package Team
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

11-Apr-2013
Shining a light into the brain
Researchers have figured out a way to insert tiny electronic devices that can detect and control light into the brains of rodents without harming the animals. Until now, similar devices, like light sources and sensors, have been safely placed upon the brain. But, inserting such electronics directly into brain tissue has caused serious damage and irritation.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

4-Apr-2013
Continent-wide look at vole populations
Climate may be affecting vole populations across Europe, a new study in the journal Science reports.

Contact: Science Press Package Team
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

28-Mar-2013
Termites behind desert 'fairy circles'
A new study uncovers the origin of fairy circles, circular patches of perennial grasses with a barren center that grow in the desert on the southwest coast of Africa. The research appears in the March 29, 2013, issue of the journal Science.

Contact: Science Press Package Team
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

21-Mar-2013
Taking robots off-roading
Researchers can learn a lot from a lizard scampering across the desert sand or an insect walking across some gravel, according to a new study. Chen Li and colleagues studied how objects move across these types of "flowable" surfaces and designed a six-legged robot that can do it easily.

Contact: Science Press Package Team
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

14-Mar-2013
Wings not lost, just hidden in some insects
The only limbs that can grow upon a modern insect's back are wings and wing-like structures, and they only appear on the second and third segments of an insect's thorax -- between their head and their abdomen. However, some insects in the fossil record seem to have wing-like "pads" on many of their non-winged body segments.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

7-Mar-2013
Prairie dogs take cooperation over competition
Why did the prairie dog cross the road? It might be because all of its close female relatives had already done so, according to a new study by John Hoogland. This researcher studied three different species of prairie dogs for more than 30 years and discovered that -- unlike many other animals -- prairie dogs tend to stay in the areas they are born until their close family members are gone.

Contact: Science Press Package Team
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

28-Feb-2013
For more food, we need wild bees
Wild insects pollinate food crops more effectively than managed honeybees, a new study appearing online in Science Express reports.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

21-Feb-2013
Watching tiny particles in a Finland forest
All over the world, tiny airborne particles from volcanoes, dust, pollution and other sources float around in the atmosphere. New field studies in a boreal forest in Hyytil, Finland, and laboratory experiments reveal how these tiny particles, called atmospheric aerosols, are formed from gas molecules, a new study appearing in the journal Science reports.

Contact: Science Press Package Team
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

14-Feb-2013
Does melting ice in the Arctic mean more algae?
Last year, Arctic sea ice fell to its lowest levels ever recorded. During that time, when the ice was the thinnest it had been in decades, scientists aboard the research vessel Polarstern found large amounts of an algae, known as Melosira arctica, growing under it.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

7-Feb-2013
What did the ancestor to most mammals look like?
A tiny, furry-tailed creature was the earliest ancestor of the placental mammals, according to a new study. That is, it was the ancestor of all the mammals except the marsupials and the small handful of mammals that lay eggs. The findings also help answer a decades-old debate about when the placental mammals first evolved.

Contact: Science Press Package Team
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

31-Jan-2013
Pigeon genome opens a door to the past
The striking differences in behavior, feathers and color patterns among various breeds of pigeons captured the attention of Sir Charles Darwin long ago. While working on his now-famous theory of evolution, Darwin repeatedly referred to pigeons as dramatic examples of diversity. In fact, today, there are more than 350 different breeds of pigeon on record.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

24-Jan-2013
Can we name all of Earth's species?
It's easy to feel overwhelmed by news about how so many of Earth's species are facing extinction. Some experts have even despaired that we won't be able to identify all of the different species of plants, animals and fungi before they disappear forever.

Contact: Science Press Package Team
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

17-Jan-2013
Animals in the Arctic linked by climate
Few creatures call the high Arctic home year-round. But, for four animals -- reindeer, birds known as rock ptarmigans, small rodents called sibling voles, and arctic foxes, which eat the other three -- Norway's tiny Spitsbergen island is home, even during the freezing winters. Now, researchers have shown that extreme weather, like icy winter rains, can bring the birth and death rates of all four species into sync with one another.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

10-Jan-2013
Artificial muscles powered by water
Researchers have designed artificial muscles, or actuators, that react to moisture in the environment. These actuators expand when they absorb water and contract when they expel it. So, when the researchers place them on a flat, wet surface, the actuators swell up and then topple over continuously.

Contact: Science Press Package Team
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

3-Jan-2013
El Nio events are currently unpredictable
Some climate events, like monsoon seasons, are thought to be influenced by greenhouse gases. But, so far, researchers have not been able to tie a quirk in the global climate, known as the El Nio-Southern Oscillation (ENSO), to any other natural or human-made processes. The ENSO occurs roughly every five years, and it warms large stretches of the Pacific Ocean while influencing rainfall around the world.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

20-Dec-2012
New space rock is rare type of meteorite
On April 22, 2012, several radar instruments -- typically used for tracking weather -- detected a fast-moving fireball in the skies over California and Nevada. Many people also saw it with their own eyes.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

13-Dec-2012
Darcin helps mice remember where scent marks are
Scent marks, or the odors that mammals leave behind to mark their territory, contain cocktails of chemicals that pass on information about the animal's gender and social status. Animals regularly revisit scent marks to get more information about the creature leaving them, but until now researchers have not known how animals relocate these scent marks days or even weeks after first finding them.

Contact: Science Press Package Team
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

6-Dec-2012
How do moths choose their flowers?
Have you ever wondered how moths know which flowers to visit for nectar? A new study shows that a particular kind of moth -- the hawkmoth -- has specific patterns of brain activity for flower odors that it is naturally attracted to. On top of that, these moths can learn to associate new odors with nectar without forgetting their original, natural preferences, according to researchers.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

29-Nov-2012
Cracked skin and crocodile scales
Researchers have discovered how the scaly skin pattern on crocodile faces and jaws is created, reports a new study in the journal Science.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

22-Nov-2012
On other planets, a new kind of magnesium oxide
Magnesium oxide, one of the simplest minerals on Earth, transforms into liquid metal under certain conditions likely to exist inside giant, Earth-like planets known as "super Earths," reports a new study in the journal Science.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

15-Nov-2012
Rainforest insect hears like a human
The ear of the South American rainforest katydid sits on the insect's hind legs, and it's one of the smallest of all hearing organs. But in other ways, the katydid ear is remarkably similar to the mammalian ear, researchers have discovered.

Contact: Science Press Package
scipak@aaas.org
202-326-6440
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Showing stories 76-100 out of 582 stories.
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Funding provided by the William T. Golden Endowment Fund for Program Innovation at AAAS.