AAAS 2015 Annual Meeting Newsroom

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NEWS RELEASES


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Showing releases 1-25 out of 57.

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Research News Releases

News Release 16-Feb-2015
2015 AAAS Annual Meeting
How the mind processes complex spatial information
Northwestern University's David H. Uttal will discuss a program that has enhanced students' learning at a variety of levels, from basic spatial reasoning to solving complex problems involving the coordination of numerous variables, such as those involved in climate change. The program is a partnership between a cognitive scientist and an environmental scientist that facilitates high school students' reasoning about complex real-world scientific and engineering problems through the use of computer-based layered maps.

Contact: Hilary Hurd Anyaso
h-anyaso@northwestern.edu
847-491-4887
Northwestern University

News Release 15-Feb-2015
2015 AAAS Annual Meeting
Engineer, physicist to turn the inner workings of living cells into 'molecular movies'
In back-to-back talks at the AAAS meeting, a chemical engineer and a physicist will describe how a chance meeting over lunch at an imaging workshop lead to QSTORM, a research project that aims to visualize the inner workings of cells in a new way.

Contact: Pam Frost Gorder
gorder.1@osu.edu
614-292-9475
Ohio State University

News Release 15-Feb-2015
2015 AAAS Annual Meeting
An Italian cemetery may provide clues on cholera's evolution
A team of archaeologists and other researchers hope that an ancient graveyard in Italy can yield clues about the deadly bacterium that causes cholera.

Contact: Jeff Grabmeier
grabmeier.1@osu.edu
614-292-8457
Ohio State University

News Release 15-Feb-2015
2015 AAAS Annual Meeting
Astrophysical Journal
Why do starburst galaxies 'burst'?
An international team of astronomers used ALMA to dissect a cluster of star-forming clouds at the heart of NGC 253, one of the nearest starburst galaxies to the Milky Way.

Contact: Charles Blue
cblue@nrao.edu
434-296-0314
National Radio Astronomy Observatory

News Release 15-Feb-2015
2015 AAAS Annual Meeting
Vast majority of scientists believe in engagement on public policy debates
Scientists say they are facing a challenging time and 87 percent believe that scientists should take an active role in public policy debates. In addition, a sizable share believes that engaging with the public and news media can advance the careers of scientists, according to a new survey by the Pew Research Center in collaboration with the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

Contact: Dana Page
dpage@pewresearch.org
202-419-4372
American Association for the Advancement of Science

News Release 15-Feb-2015
2015 AAAS Annual Meeting
AAAS symposium looks at how to bring big-data skills to academia
A session Feb. 15 at the American Association for the Advancement of Science annual meeting will explore how big data scientists can find careers at universities and within academic settings.

Contact: Michelle Ma
mcma@uw.edu
University of Washington

News Release 15-Feb-2015
2015 AAAS Annual Meeting
Some bilinguals use emoticons more when chatting in non-native language
A research team has found that one group of bilingual speakers used emoticons more often when typing in their second language in casual, online communication than they did when typing in their native tongue.

Contact: Michelle Ma
mcma@uw.edu
University of Washington

News Release 15-Feb-2015
2015 AAAS Annual Meeting
Poor decision-making can lead to cybersecurity breaches
Recent high-profile security breaches, such as those at Target, Anthem Inc. and Sony Pictures, have attracted scrutiny to how the seemingly minor decisions of individuals can have major cybersecurity consequences. In a presentation at this year's meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, Michigan State University's Rick Wash discussed how social interactions affect the processes behind personal cybersecurity decision-making.

Contact: Mark Kuykendall
mark.kuykendall@cabs.msu.edu
517-355-2282
Michigan State University

News Release 14-Feb-2015
2015 AAAS Annual Meeting
Capturing and storing carbon in soil: Is it real and can it scale?
The Arizona State University-SoilCarbon Nation team is examining the adaptive multi-paddock (AMP) grazing management technique that involves using small-sized fields to provide short periods of grazing for livestock and long recovery periods for fields. The method mimics the migrations of wild herd animals, such as elk, bison and deer. The science team proposes a whole system science measurement approach in comparing AMP grazing with conventional, continuous grazing methods.

Contact: Peter Byck
peter.byck@asu.edu
323-252-5272
Arizona State University

News Release 14-Feb-2015
2015 AAAS Annual Meeting
Social network analysis privacy tackled
Protecting people's privacy in an age of online big data is difficult, but doing so when using visual representations of such things as social network data may present unique challenges, according to a Penn State computer scientist.

Contact: A'ndrea Elyse Messer
aem1@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

News Release 14-Feb-2015
2015 AAAS Annual Meeting
Going negative
A growing number of scientists warn that low-carbon technologies might not be enough to curb global warming. The solution, they say, could require a new suite of carbon-negative technologies that actually remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. This negative-emissions approach to reducing atmospheric CO2 will be the focus of a symposium at the 2015 annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science on Feb. 14, 8:30 a.m. PT, at the San Jose Convention Center, Room 220C.
Global Climate and Energy Project at Stanford University

Contact: Mark Golden
mark.golden@stanford.edu
650-724-1629
Stanford University

News Release 14-Feb-2015
2015 AAAS Annual Meeting
Tracking parasites with satellites
Scientists are teaming up to use satellite data to target deadly parasites to help predict patterns of parasitic diseases such as malaria, worms and hydatids.

Contact: ANU Media
media@anu.edu.au
61-261-257-979
Australian National University

News Release 14-Feb-2015
2015 AAAS Annual Meeting
A formula for predicting innovation
Arizona State University researchers are developing a mathematical technique to predict the emergence of scientific innovation, based on research citations and historical analysis.
National Science Founcation

Contact: Diane Boudreau
dianeb@asu.edu
Arizona State University

News Release 14-Feb-2015
2015 AAAS Annual Meeting
Iconic graph at center of climate debate
The 'Hockey Stick' graph, a simple plot representing temperature over time, led to the center of the larger debate on climate change, and skewed the trajectory of at least one researcher, according to Michael Mann, Distinguished Professor of Meteorology, Penn State.

Contact: A'ndrea Elyse Messer
aem1@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

News Release 14-Feb-2015
2015 AAAS Annual Meeting
The future of electronics -- now in 2-D
The future of electronics could lie in a material from its past, as researchers from The Ohio State University work to turn germanium -- the material of 1940s transistors -- into a potential replacement for silicon.

Contact: Pam Frost Gorder
Gorder.1@osu.edu
614-292-9475
Ohio State University

News Release 14-Feb-2015
2015 AAAS Annual Meeting
Pitt expert talks about teenage brain development at AAAS Annual Meeting
Teenage exploration and risk taking could be explained by dramatic brain changes that allow planning and encourage the need for immediate reward, according to a University of Pittsburgh neuroscientist who be discussing her research in a panel discussion and press briefing at the AAAS annual meeting, Feb. 13-16, in San Jose, Calif.

Contact: Anita Srikameswaran
SrikamAV@upmc.edu
412-578-9193
University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences

News Release 14-Feb-2015
2015 AAAS Annual Meeting
Quantum research past, present and future for discussion at AAAS
A panel of quantum experts from three world-leading institutes will share their insights on quantum research, from its beginnings to its exciting future, in a moderated discussion at the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

Contact: Nick Manning
nmanning@uwaterloo.ca
226-929-7627
University of Waterloo

News Release 14-Feb-2015
2015 AAAS Annual Meeting
Cannabis: World-renowned researchers discuss a new frontier in therapeutics
While debate about recreational marijuana use continues, researchers are investigating the effectiveness of cannabis for treating pain, spasticity, and a host of other medical problems. In a symposium organized by the McGill University Health Centre as part of the 2015 American Association for the Advancement of Science Annual Meeting held this week in San Jose, world-renowned experts share their perspectives on the therapeutic potential of medical cannabis and explore the emerging science behind it.

Contact: Julie Robert
julie.robert@muhc.mcgill.ca
514-971-4747
McGill University Health Centre

News Release 14-Feb-2015
2015 AAAS Annual Meeting
Leading scholar presents advances in research of electric car batteries at AAAS
Lithium-sulphur batteries promise to extend the range of electric cars at least three times over current lithium ion cells and at much lower cost, making electric cars practical and potentially more appealing to a mass market. Linda Nazar, professor of chemistry from the Faculty of Science at the University of Waterloo, will present a perspective on the promise and reality of lithium-sulfur batteries at the American Association for the Advancement of Science Annual Meeting in San Jose, Calif.

Contact: Nick Manning
nmanning@uwaterloo.ca
226-929-7627
University of Waterloo

News Release 14-Feb-2015
2015 AAAS Annual Meeting
Twitter the right prescription for sharing health research: UBC study
Using Twitter can help physicians be better prepared to answer questions from their patients, according to researchers from the University of British Columbia.

Contact: Julie Robillard
jrobilla@mail.ubc.ca
University of British Columbia

News Release 14-Feb-2015
2015 AAAS Annual Meeting
Light reveals new details of Gauguin's creative process
French artist Paul Gauguin is well known for his colorful paintings, but he also was a highly experimental printmaker. Little is known, however, about how he created his complex graphic works. Now a team of scientists and art conservators from Northwestern University and the Art Institute of Chicago has used a light bulb, an SLR camera and computational power to uncover new details of Gauguin's process -- how he formed, layered and re-used imagery to make 19 unique graphic works.

Contact: Megan Fellman
fellman@northwestern.edu
847-491-3115
Northwestern University

News Release 13-Feb-2015
2015 AAAS Annual Meeting
Mapping the gut microbiome to better understand its role in obesity
Several recent science studies have claimed that the gut microbiome -- the diverse array of bacteria that live in the stomach and intestines -- may be to blame for obesity. But Katherine Pollard, Ph.D., a senior investigator at the Gladstone Institutes, says it is not that simple.

Contact: Dana Smith
dana.smith@gladstone.ucsf.edu
415-734-2532
Gladstone Institutes

News Release 13-Feb-2015
2015 AAAS Annual Meeting
World crop diversity survives in small farms from peri-urban to remote rural locations
As much as 75 percent of global seed diversity in staple food crops is held and actively used by a wide range of small farmholders -- workers of less than three to seven acres -- with the rest in gene banks, according to a Penn State geographer.

Contact: A'ndrea Elyse Messer
aem1@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

News Release 13-Feb-2015
2015 AAAS Annual Meeting
E-Cigarettes help smokers quit, ban reflex and 'no harm' perception must be challenged
E-cigarettes are already used by tens of millions of smokers around the world. Hundreds of versions are available online or in specialized shops. Analysts at Wells Fargo predict that sales will outstrip classical cigarettes by 2021. These battery-powered devices work by delivering aerosol 'vapor' containing nicotine to the user. The apparent medical advantage is that the vapor produced contains compounds in the tens to hundreds compared with the 8,600 or more produced in cigarette smoke that cause life-threatening diseases.

Contact: Aidan Gilligan
ag@sci-com.eu
32-474-042-602
SciCom - Making Sense of Science

News Release 13-Feb-2015
2015 AAAS Annual Meeting
Larger area analysis needed to understand patterns in ancient prehistory
Archaeologists need to study larger areas of land and link those studies to measurable environmental, societal and demographic changes to understand variations in prehistoric societies, according to Penn State anthropologists. The large areas are necessary to say anything meaningful about human behavioral response to social and environmental events.
National Science Foundation

Contact: A'ndrea Elyse Messer
aem1@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Showing releases 1-25 out of 57.

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