Contacts:

ACS Press Center in D.C.
Aug. 20-23, 2017
202-249-4007
newsroom@acs.org

Katie Cottingham, Ph.D.
301-775-8455 (Cell)
k_cottingham@acs.org

A full range of media resources will be available to assist in your coverage of the 254th American Chemical Society national meeting, whether you are reporting onsite or from a remote location. There will be press releases and press conferences on abstracts chosen from nearly 9,400 scientific presentations.

Watch live press conferences on YouTube here: http://bit.ly/ACSLive_DC on Monday, Aug. 21, through Wednesday, Aug. 23. Anyone can view the briefings, but to chat, you must first sign in with a Google account.

Modern chemistry is a multi-disciplinary science, and the Washington, D.C., meeting will include newsworthy topics spanning science's horizons. Thousands of scientists and others from around the world are expected to attend.

The American Chemical Society, the world’s largest scientific society, is a not-for-profit organization chartered by the U.S. Congress. ACS is a global leader in providing access to chemistry-related information and research through its multiple databases, peer-reviewed journals and scientific conferences. ACS does not conduct research, but publishes and publicizes peer-reviewed scientific studies. Its main offices are in Washington, D.C., and Columbus, Ohio.

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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 26.

[ 1 | 2 ]

Research News Release

Public Release: 23-Aug-2017
American Chemical Society 254th National Meeting & Exposition
Spinning plant waste into carbon fiber for cars, planes
Using plants and trees to make products such as paper or ethanol leaves behind a residue called lignin. That leftover lignin isn't good for much and often gets burned or tossed into landfills. Now, researchers report transforming lignin into carbon fiber to produce a lower-cost material strong enough to build car or aircraft parts. The researchers are presenting their results at the 254th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Katie Cottingham
k_cottingham@acs.org
301-775-8455
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 23-Aug-2017
American Chemical Society 254th National Meeting & Exposition
Fatal attractions for disease-carrying mosquitoes
ISCA Technologies, a California-based biotech firm, is working on several innovations to stop outbreaks of malaria-spreading mosquitos before they occur by using pheromones and other naturally occurring attractants.
Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, US Department of Agriculture, US Department of Defense

Contact: David Danelski
david.danelski@ISCAtech.com
951-850-0143
ISCA Technologies Inc.

Public Release: 23-Aug-2017
American Chemical Society 254th National Meeting & Exposition
Mosquitoes fatally attracted to deadly, sweet-smelling potion
Mosquitoes have a sweet tooth, relying on plant nectar to survive. Exploiting this weakness, scientists have developed an environmentally friendly eradication method whereby the pests gorge themselves on insecticides laced with a concoction that mimics the sweet-smelling scents and aromas that they find irresistible. It could bolster efforts to suppress malaria, Zika and other mosquito-borne diseases. The researchers are presenting their results at the 254th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Katie Cottingham
k_cottingham@acs.org
301-775-8455
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 23-Aug-2017
American Chemical Society 254th National Meeting & Exposition
What the world's tiniest 'monster truck' reveals
The world's shortest race by distance -- a fraction of the width of a human hair -- was a huge success for scientists working at the nanoscale. It spurred interest in molecular machines and led to a surprising new discovery, reports the team that entered a nano-sized 'monster truck.' The researchers present their nanocar at the 254th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Katie Cottingham
k_cottingham@acs.org
301-775-8455
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 22-Aug-2017
American Chemical Society 254th National Meeting & Exposition
Cyborg bacteria outperform plants when turning sunlight into useful compounds (video)
Photosynthesis provides energy for the vast majority of life on Earth. But chlorophyll, the green pigment that plants use to harvest sunlight, is relatively inefficient. To enable humans to capture more of the sun's energy, scientists have taught bacteria to cover themselves in tiny, highly efficient solar panels to produce useful compounds. The researchers are presenting their results at the 254th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Katie Cottingham
k_cottingham@acs.org
301-775-8455
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 22-Aug-2017
American Chemical Society 254th National Meeting & Exposition
'Coffee-ring effect' harnessed to provide rapid, low-cost analysis of tap water (video)
'What's in your water?' has become an increasingly fraught question for many people, and getting the answer isn't always easy or cheap. Today, scientists are reporting that they are using the familiar 'coffee-ring effect' to analyze multiple components in a single drop of water easily, quickly and cheaply. The researchers are presenting their results at the 254th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Katie Cottingham
k_cottingham@acs.org
301-775-8455
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 22-Aug-2017
American Chemical Society 254th National Meeting & Exposition
Getting fat to 'talk' again could lower blood glucose and weight
Researchers are exploring a novel approach to treating diabetes: implanting a polymer sponge into fat tissue. Their study has shown that in obese mice with symptoms resembling Type 2 diabetes, the implant reduced weight gain and blood-sugar levels -- by getting the fat to 'talk' again. The researchers are presenting their results at the 254th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Katie Cottingham
k_cottingham@acs.org
301-775-8455
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 22-Aug-2017
American Chemical Society 254th National Meeting & Exposition
Turning human waste into plastic, nutrients could aid long-distance space travel (video)
Imagine you're on your way to Mars, and you lose a crucial tool during a spacewalk. Not to worry, you'll simply re-enter your spacecraft and use some microorganisms to convert your urine and exhaled carbon dioxide into chemicals to make a new tool. That's one goal of scientists developing ways to make long space trips feasible. The researchers will present their results today at the 254th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Katie Cottingham
k_cottingham@acs.org
301-775-8455
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 21-Aug-2017
American Chemical Society 254th National Meeting & Exposition
New vaccine could someday fight the effects of opioid combinations
Substance abuse is a continuing problem in the US, to the point of being an 'epidemic.' Treatments exist, but far too often patients relapse with devastating impacts on themselves and those around them. Now, scientists report that they have made progress toward a vaccine against the effects of fentanyl, a synthetic opioid, in combination with heroin. The researchers are presenting their research at the 254th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Katie Cottingham
k_cottingham@acs.org
301-775-8455
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 21-Aug-2017
American Chemical Society 254th National Meeting & Exposition
Clay-based antimicrobial packaging keeps food fresh
Sometimes it seems as if fresh food goes bad in the blink of an eye. Consumers are left feeling frustrated, turning to cheaper, processed foods. Now scientists report that they developed a packaging film coated with clay nanotubes containing an antibacterial essential oil. The film prevents over ripening and microbial growth, improving the shelf life of perishables. The researchers are presenting their results today at the 254th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Katie Cottingham
k_cottingham@acs.org
301-775-8455
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 21-Aug-2017
American Chemical Society 254th National Meeting & Exposition
Smart label could one day let you know when to toss food and cosmetics (video)
Detecting food and cosmetic spoilage and contamination. Identifying new medicinal plants in a remote jungle. Authenticating tea and wine. Scientists have developed a low-cost, portable, paper-based sensor that can potentially carry out all of these functions with easy-to-read results. The researchers are presenting their results today at the 254th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Katie Cottingham
k_cottingham@acs.org
301-775-8455
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 21-Aug-2017
American Chemical Society 254th National Meeting & Exposition
Licorice is a hot trend in hot flashes, but could interact with medications
Licorice roots have a flavorful history, having been used in ancient Egyptian teas and in traditional Chinese medicines, all the way to today as a flavoring agent and candy. And some women now take licorice extracts as supplements to treat menopausal symptoms. But scientists caution that licorice could pose a health risk by interacting with medications. The researchers are presenting their results today at the 254th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Katie Cottingham
k_cottingham@acs.org
301-775-8455
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 21-Aug-2017
American Chemical Society 254th National Meeting & Exposition
Sopping up sunblock from oceans to save coral reefs (video)
Coral reefs can't seem to catch a break. Not only are rising temperatures wreaking havoc with their environment, but emerging evidence suggests that a certain sunblock component is a coral killer. Now, researchers have developed a biodegradable bead that can soak up the sunblock ingredient, oxybenzone, like a thirsty sea sponge. The researchers are presenting their results at the 254th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Katie Cottingham
k_cottingham@acs.org
301-775-8455
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 21-Aug-2017
American Chemical Society 254th National Meeting & Exposition
Remarkable artistry hidden in ancient Roman painting revealed
Molten lava, volcanic ash, modern grime, salt, humidity. The ancient painting of a Roman woman has been through it all, and it looks like it. Scientists now report that a new type of high-resolution X-ray technology is helping them discover just how stunning the original portrait once was, element-by-element, which could help them restore the painting. The researchers are presenting their results at the 254th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Katie Cottingham
k_cottingham@acs.org
301-775-8455
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 21-Aug-2017
American Chemical Society 254th National Meeting & Exposition
Avocado seed husks could be a gold mine of medicinal and industrial compounds
In a first-of-its-kind study, scientists report that avocado seed husks, which are usually discarded along with the seed, contain a plethora of useful chemical compounds. They say these compounds could eventually be used to treat a host of debilitating diseases, as well as to enhance the allure of cosmetics, perfumes and other consumer goods. The researchers are presenting their results at the 254th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Katie Cottingham
k_cottingham@acs.org
301-775-8455
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 20-Aug-2017
American Chemical Society 254th National Meeting & Exposition
Sugars in human mother's milk are new class of antibacterial agents
A new study has found that sugars in mother's' milk do not just provide nutrition for babies but also help protect them from bacterial infections, making them a new class of antimicrobial agent.
National Institutes of Health, US Department of Veterans Affairs, NIH/National Center for Research Resources, NIH/National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences

Contact: David F Salisbury
david.salisbury@vanderbilt.edu
615-343-6803
Vanderbilt University

Public Release: 20-Aug-2017
American Chemical Society 254th National Meeting & Exposition
Silk could improve sensitivity, flexibility of wearable body sensors
From smart socks to workout clothes that measure exertion, wearable body sensors are becoming the latest 'must-have' technology. Now scientists report they are on the cusp of using silk, one of the world's most coveted fabrics, to develop a more sensitive and flexible generation of these multi-purpose devices that monitor a slew of body functions. The researchers are presenting their results at the 254th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Katie Cottingham
k_cottingham@acs.org
301-775-8455
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 20-Aug-2017
American Chemical Society 254th National Meeting & Exposition
Sugars in some breast milk could help protect babies from group B strep
Group B strep bacteria remain the leading cause of severe infections in newborns worldwide. Now researchers have found that although the pathogen can be transmitted to infants through breastfeeding, some mothers produce protective sugars in their milk that could help prevent infection and fight biofilm formation -- the first example of carbohydrates in human milk having this function. The researchers are presenting their results at the 254th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Katie Cottingham
k_cottingham@acs.org
301-775-8455
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 20-Aug-2017
American Chemical Society 254th National Meeting & Exposition
Testing TVs and tablets for 'green' screens
Today, researchers report preliminary results suggesting that under simulated landfill conditions, quantum dots can leach out of TVs and tablets. But because this happens in such tiny amounts, the team says that in the grand scheme of things, it might make sense to use the more toxic quantum dots that are made with a more eco-friendly process. The researchers are presenting their results at the 254th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Katie Cottingham
k_cottingham@acs.org
301-775-8455
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 20-Aug-2017
American Chemical Society 254th National Meeting & Exposition
Mussel-inspired glue could one day make fetal surgery safer
Whether to perform surgery on a fetus is a heart-wrenching decision. This type of surgery involves penetrating the delicate amniotic sac, increasing health risks to the fetus. Now researchers report the development of a glue, inspired by the tenacious grip of mussels on slippery rocks, that could one day help save the lives of the youngest patients. The researchers present their findings today at the 254th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Katie Cottingham
k_cottingham@acs.org
301-775-8455
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 20-Aug-2017
American Chemical Society 254th National Meeting & Exposition
Energized fabrics could keep soldiers warm and battle-ready in frigid climates
Soldiering in arctic conditions is tough. Protective clothing can be heavy and can cause overheating and sweating, while hands and feet can grow numb. To keep military personnel more comfortable, scientists are trying to create high-tech fabrics that heat up when powered and that capture sweat. These fabrics could conceivably be used in future consumer clothing. The researchers will present their results today at the 254th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Katie Cottingham
k_cottingham@acs.org
301-775-8455
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 20-Aug-2017
American Chemical Society 254th National Meeting & Exposition
No guts no glory: Harvesting the microbiome of athletes
Scientists have tapped into the microbiome of elite runners and rowers, and have identified particular bacteria that may aid athletic performance. The goal is to develop probiotic supplements that may help athletes -- and even amateur fitness enthusiasts -- recover from a tough workout or more efficiently convert nutrients to energy. The researchers will present their work today at the 254th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Katie Cottingham
k_cottingham@acs.org
301-775-8455
American Chemical Society

Award Announcement

Public Release: 20-Aug-2017
American Chemical Society 254th National Meeting & Exposition
Talented 12: Chemical & Engineering News announces its 2017 rising stars in chemistry
Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN) magazine is revealing its annual 'Talented 12' list. The young, rising stars in chemistry are trying to solve some of the most difficult problems facing the world. From alternative energy to cancer treatment and combating the opioid epidemic, these young scientists have accepted the challenge. At an event today at ACS' 254th National Meeting & Exposition their identities will be revealed and featured in an upcoming issue of C&EN.

Contact: Katie Cottingham
k_cottingham@acs.org
301-775-8455
American Chemical Society

Meeting Announcement

Public Release: 11-Jul-2017
American Chemical Society 254th National Meeting & Exposition
Highlights for the 2017 American Chemical Society fall national meeting
Journalists registering for the American Chemical Society's (ACS') 254th National Meeting & Exposition will have a wealth of new scientific information available for their news stories. Nearly 9,400 presentations are planned on a wide range of topics from health to the environment. The meeting, one of the largest scientific conferences of the year, will be held Aug. 20-24 in Washington, D.C.

Contact: Katie Cottingham
k_cottingham@acs.org
301-775-8455
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 30-May-2017
American Chemical Society 254th National Meeting & Exposition
Press registration opens for 2017 fall national meeting of the American Chemical Society
Journalists may now apply for press credentials for the American Chemical Society's 254th National Meeting & Exposition, one of the largest scientific conferences of the year. It will be held Aug. 20-24, 2017, in Washington, D.C.

Contact: Katie Cottingham
k_cottingham@acs.org
301-775-8455
American Chemical Society

Showing releases 1-25 out of 26.

[ 1 | 2 ]


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