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Showing releases 1-25 out of 1212.

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Public Release: 6-Dec-2016
Nature Communications
New application of existing drug offers personalized therapy for lung cancer
A subset of lung tumors is exquisitely sensitive to a class of recently approved anti-cancer drugs. Researchers at the CeMM Research Center for Molecular Medicine of the Austrian Academy of Sciences in Vienna and the Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research in Oxford published this finding in the journal Nature Communications. It opens the way for new clinical trials in a type of cancer considered to be 'undruggable' and may lead to a therapy for up to 10 percent of lung cancer patients.
European Research Council, Moffitt Lung Cancer Center of Excellence, Austrian Science Fund, Vienna Science and Technology Fund, European Union FP7 Career Integration Grant, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Ministry of Education Youth and Sports of the Czech

Contact: Wolfgang Däuble
wdaeuble@cemm.oeaw.ac.at
43-140-160-70057
CeMM Research Center for Molecular Medicine of the Austrian Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 5-Dec-2016
Neuroscience 2016
A traditional Japanese art inspires a futuristic innovation: Brain 'organoids'
The ancient Japanese art of flower arranging was the inspiration for a groundbreaking technique to create tiny 'artificial brains' that could be used to develop personalized cancer treatments.

Contact: Brian Kladko
brian.kladko@ubc.ca
604-827-3301
University of British Columbia

Public Release: 5-Dec-2016
Nature Medicine
Genetic factors control regenerative properties of blood-forming stem cells
Researchers from the UCLA Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology Oncology and the Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCLA have published two studies that define how key genetic factors affect blood-forming stem cells by either accelerating or hindering the cells' regenerative properties. The findings could one day lead to improved treatments for people undergoing common therapies for cancer such as chemotherapy and radiation.
NIH/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, California Institute for Regenerative Medicine, NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Mirabai Vogt-James
mvogt@mednet.ucla.edu
310-562-8664
University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences

Public Release: 5-Dec-2016
American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting
Immunotherapy shows promise in preventing leukemia relapse
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center announced promising results from an early trial in which patients with high-risk acute myeloid leukemia received genetically engineered immune cells. Of the 12 AML patients who received this experimental T-cell therapy after a transplant put their disease in remission, all are still in remission after a median follow-up of more than two years.
National Institutes of Health, Juno Therapeutics Inc.

Contact: Claire Hudson
crhudson@fredhutch.org
206-919-8300
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center

Public Release: 5-Dec-2016
58th ASH Annual Meeting
Simple steps lengthen lives of high-risk AML patients
New SWOG research shows that quickly identifying patients with high-risk acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and speeding the process to find them a stem cell donor and performing the transplant earlier, can significantly improve their chances of surviving for at least two years after diagnosis. These potentially practice-changing results will be presented Monday, Dec. 5, at the 58th American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Wendy Lawton
lawtonw@ohsu.edu
503-348-8675
SWOG

Public Release: 5-Dec-2016
58th ASH Annual Meeting
Advances in multiple myeloma, lymphoma and other hematologic malignancies presented at ASH
Researchers from UH Seidman Cancer Center and Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine presented new findings in multiple myeloma, lymphoma and other hematologic disorders at Annual Meeting of American Society of Hematology. Major advances have been made in treating multiple myeloma over the last 12 years and early phase clinical trials have played a key role in this progress according to an oral presentation (Abstract #1146) by Ehsan Malek, M.D., of UH Seidman Cancer Center.

Contact: Alicia Reale
alicia.reale@uhhospitals.org
University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center

Public Release: 5-Dec-2016
58th ASH Annual Meeting
Nivolumab with chemotherapy improves response, survival in AML study patients
The immunotherapy drug nivolumab in combination with standard chemotherapy more than doubled response rates and improved overall survival in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), according to preliminary findings by researchers at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.

Contact: Ron Gilmore
rlgilmore1@mdanderson.org
713-745-1898
University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

Public Release: 5-Dec-2016
58th ASH Annual Meeting
Combination immune therapy shows promise against Hodgkin lymphoma
The combination of two new drugs that harness the body's immune system is safe and effective, destroying most cancer cells in 64 percent of patients with recurrent Hodgkin lymphoma, according to the results of an early-phase study.

Contact: David March
david.march@nyumc.org
212-404-3528
NYU Langone Medical Center / New York University School of Medicine

Public Release: 5-Dec-2016
58th ASH Annual Meeting
Psychosocial risk factors are associated with high readmission rates, longer hospital stays
A new study shows that psychosocial risk factors that impact a person's ability to cope with chronic stress are associated with significantly higher readmission rates and longer hospital stays among blood cancer patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), according to researchers at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center.
The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer - Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute

Contact: Amanda Harper
amanda.harper2@osumc.edu
614-685-5420
Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center

Public Release: 5-Dec-2016
JAMA Internal Medicine
No safe level of smoking
People who consistently smoked an average of less than one cigarette per day over their lifetime had a 64 percent higher risk of earlier death than people who never smoked.

Contact: NCI Press Officers
ncipressofficers@mail.nih.gov
301-496-6641
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Public Release: 5-Dec-2016
58th ASH Annual Meeting
Drug combination yields results in patients with forms of leukemia or lymphoma
A combination of two targeted agents -- one approved by the Food and Drug Administration and one undergoing testing -- has demonstrated safety as well as encouraging signs of effectiveness in a phase 1 clinical trial in patients with relapsed or hard-to-treat chronic lymphocytic leukemia or mantle cell lymphoma.

Contact: Anne Doerr
anne_doerr@dfci.harvard.edu
440-670-6563
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Public Release: 5-Dec-2016
58th ASH Annual Meeting
Children with Down syndrome and ALL fare as well as others treated on DFCI ALL protocols
Despite an elevated risk of toxicity from chemotherapy, children with Down syndrome and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) did not experience higher rates of relapse or treatment-related mortality compared with other children treated on Dana-Farber Cancer Institute ALL Consortium Protocols.

Contact: Anne Doerr
anne_doerr@dfci.harvard.edu
617-632-5665
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Public Release: 5-Dec-2016
58th ASH Annual Meeting
Early treatment may prevent progression to multiple myeloma
Early intervention with an immunotherapy-based drug combination may prevent progression of high-risk 'smoldering' multiple myeloma to the full-blown disease, according to researchers from Dana-Farber Cancer Institute.

Contact: Anne Doerr
anne_doerr@dfci.harvard.edu
617-632-5665
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Public Release: 5-Dec-2016
58th ASH Annual Meeting
Moffitt Cancer Center study shows promising clinical activity
Immune cellular therapy is a promising new area of cancer treatment. Anti-cancer therapeutics, such as chimeric antigen receptor modified T cells, can be engineered to target tumor-associated antigens to attack and kill cancer cells. This allows for an improved precision medicine approach to treating cancer.

Contact: Lisa Chillura
Lisa.Chillura@Moffitt.org
813-745-1353
H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute

Public Release: 5-Dec-2016
IASLC 2016 World Conference on Lung Cancer
Global public health advocates open new fronts in war on tobacco
Efforts to control tobacco as a public health threat have escalated as clinicians and public health advocates have coalesced to beat back threats from tobacco companies through public advocacy, public health, and pension reform. Today, public health advocates from Brazil, Malaysia, Ireland, Australia, and Uruguay presented different strategies that have effectively reigned in the global threat of tobacco companies at a press briefing held at IASLC 17th World Conference on Lung Cancer (WCLC).

Contact: Chris Martin
cmartin@davidjamesgroup.com
630-670-2745
International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer

Public Release: 5-Dec-2016
Journal of American Chemical Society
UMMS scientist designs lamp light operative photodynamic molecules for tumor therapy
UMass Medical School scientist Gang Han, PhD, and his team have designed a new class of molecules used in photodynamic therapy that are able to direct lamp light deep into tissue to kill cancer tumors.

Contact: Megan Bard
megan.bard@umassmed.edu
508-856-2296
University of Massachusetts Medical School

Public Release: 5-Dec-2016
58th ASH Annual Meeting
Leukemia drug combo is encouraging in early Phase I clinical trial
In a Phase I study, 8 out of 12 patients with relapsed and/or chemotherapy refractory blood cancers responded to a combination of the chemotherapy drugs thioguanine and decitabine; some of the responders had relapsed after treatment with decitabine alone.
Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center at Columbia University Medical Center

Contact: Karin Eskenazi
ket2116@cumc.columbia.edu
212-342-0508
Columbia University Medical Center

Public Release: 5-Dec-2016
Human Reproduction
Cancer drug may cause women to grow new eggs, study suggests
Women treated with a common chemotherapy drug combination have more young eggs in their ovaries afterwards, research has found.
Medical Research Council

Contact: Catriona Kelly
Catriona.Kelly@ed.ac.uk
44-131-651-4401
University of Edinburgh

Public Release: 5-Dec-2016
Cancer Research
Double whammy for triple negative breast cancer
New Weizmann Institute of Science research provides hope for cancer patients.

Contact: Yael Edelman
yael.edelman@weizmann.ac.il
Weizmann Institute of Science

Public Release: 5-Dec-2016
58th ASH Annual Meeting
Mutations in lymphoma patients undergoing transplants raise risk of second cancers
A significant percentage of lymphoma patients undergoing transplants with their own blood stem cells carry acquired genetic mutations that increase their risks of developing second hematologic cancers and dying from other causes, according to a study from Dana-Farber Cancer Institute.

Contact: Anne Doerr
anne_doerr@dfci.harvard.edu
617-632-5665
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Public Release: 5-Dec-2016
58th ASH Annual Meeting
Immunotherapy agent yields full and partial remissions in aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphomas
An immunotherapy drug able to induce lasting remissions in classical Hodgkin lymphoma may be equally effective in patients with either of two rare, aggressive forms of non-Hodgkin lymphoma, results from a small case study from Dana-Farber Cancer Institute researchers.

Contact: Anne Doerr
anne_doerr@dfci.harvard.edu
617-632-5665
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Public Release: 5-Dec-2016
Genome Biology
Researchers uncover protein-based 'cancer signature'
A research team at the University of Basel's Biozentrum has investigated the expression of ribosomal proteins in a wide range of human tissues including tumors and discovered a cancer type specific signature. As the researchers report in Genome Biology this 'cancer signature' could potentially be used to predict the progression of the disease.

Contact: Heike Sacher
heike.sacher@unibas.ch
University of Basel

Public Release: 4-Dec-2016
IASLC 2016 World Conference on Lung Cancer
Advocacy and community health care models complement research and clinical care
Global lung cancer researchers and patient advocates today emphasized that new models of delivering care and communicating about cancer care play an important role in the fight against lung cancer. Their remarks come on the first day of the IASLC 17th World Conference on Lung Cancer in Vienna, Austria.
Bonnie J. Addario Lung Cancer Foundation

Contact: Chris Martin
cmartin@davidjamesgroup.com
630-670-2745
International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer

Public Release: 3-Dec-2016
American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting
Moffitt Cancer Center study shows improved response rates in myelodysplastic syndromes patients treated with lenalidomide and epoetin alpha
Patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) suffer from a reduction in the number of different types of blood cells, including red blood cells leading to the development of anemia. Many patients with lower-risk MDS benefit from treatment with recombinant-erythropoietin (rHuEPO), which stimulates blood cell production. However, patients who become refractory to rHuEPO have few effective treatment options.

Contact: Lisa Chillura
Lisa.Chillura@Moffitt.org
813-745-1353
H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute

Public Release: 3-Dec-2016
American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting
CPX-351 improves survival following allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant in older high-risk acute myeloid leukemia patients
Acute myeloid leukemia, or AML, is a type of cancer of the blood and bone marrow. It occurs most often in older populations and progresses rapidly, interfering with the production of red blood cells, white blood cells and platelets. Treatments include chemotherapy, drug therapy and stem-cell transplants.

Contact: Lisa Chillura
Lisa.Chillura@Moffitt.org
813-745-1353
H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute

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