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Showing releases 1-25 out of 1223.

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Public Release: 7-Dec-2016
ESMO Asia 2016 Congress
Patients wait 4 months before seeking cancer diagnosis
Patients wait an average of four months before seeking a cancer diagnosis, researchers report at the ESMO ASIA 2016 Congress in Singapore. Some patients waited less than a week before seeing a doctor while others waited three years.

Contact: ESMO Press Office
media@esmo.org
European Society for Medical Oncology

Public Release: 6-Dec-2016
58th ASH Annual Meeting
IKZF1 gene mutations found to increase hereditary risk for ALL in children
A late-breaking abstract being presented today during the 58th American Society of Hematology (ASH) Annual Meeting and Exposition in San Diego identifies inherited genetic mutations in the gene IKZF1 that confer a higher likelihood of developing pediatric acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL).

Contact: Stephen Fitzmaurice
sfitzmaurice@hematology.org
561-506-6890
American Society of Hematology

Public Release: 6-Dec-2016
58th ASH Annual Meeting
Cancer drug ibrutinib found helpful in treating graft versus host disease after transplant
A late-breaking abstract being presented today during the 58th American Society of Hematology (ASH) Annual Meeting and Exposition in San Diego shows patients who experience graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) after stem cell transplantation that is not resolved by corticosteroid treatment may benefit from the use of ibrutinib, an anti-cancer drug approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for treating certain blood cancers.

Contact: Stephen Fitzmaurice
sfitzmaurice@hematology.org
561-506-6890
American Society of Hematology

Public Release: 6-Dec-2016
58th ASH Annual Meeting
First multicenter trial; CAR T-cell immunotherapy effective for lymphoma
A late-breaking abstract being presented today during the 58th American Society of Hematology (ASH) Annual Meeting and Exposition in San Diego demonstrates that chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy is a promising option for treating refractory non-Hodgkin lymphoma and practical to implement in a variety of real-world clinical settings.

Contact: Stephen Fitzmaurice
sfitzmaurice@hematology.org
561-506-6890
American Society of Hematology

Public Release: 6-Dec-2016
58th ASH Annual Meeting
Additions to standard multiple myeloma therapy do not appear to yield additional benefit
Trial results being presented today during the 58th American Society of Hematology (ASH) Annual Meeting and Exposition in San Diego suggest two therapies that are often added to standard therapy in patients with multiple myeloma do not improve rates of progression-free survival compared with the current standard course of treatment alone.

Contact: Stephen Fitzmaurice
sfitzmaurice@hematology.org
561-506-6890
American Society of Hematology

Public Release: 6-Dec-2016
Joint Congress of the British and Dutch Societies for Immunology
New system developed that can switch on immune cells to attack cancer cells
Researchers have developed an artificial structure that mimics the cell membrane, which can switch on immune cells to attack and destroy a designated target. This method has potential to be used as a future cancer immunotherapy treatment as well as providing more insight into how immune cells are activated to find and kill cancer cells. The findings are presented today at the Joint Congress of the British and Dutch Societies for Immunology, taking place in Liverpool, UK.

Contact: Jennie Evans
j.evans@immunology.org
44-077-038-07444
British Society For Immunology

Public Release: 6-Dec-2016
PLOS Medicine
Clinical implications of cancer genomics -- a special issue of PLOS Medicine
This week's edition of PLOS Medicine, featuring four Research Articles and two Perspectives, begins a special issue devoted to research on cancer genomics. Research and discussion papers selected along with two leaders in the field, Guest Editors Elaine Mardis and Marc Ladanyi, will highlight progress in the study of important cancer types, and assess the clinical implications of progress in this fast-moving field.

Contact: Charles Perou
chuck_perou@med.unc.edu
PLOS

Public Release: 6-Dec-2016
JAMA Oncology
Cancer's deadly toll grows in less developed countries as new cases increase globally
While cancer is the world's second leading cause of death after cardiovascular diseases, the chances of getting cancer and dying from it look radically different depending on where you live, according to a new analysis of 32 cancer groups in 195 countries or territories.
Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Kayla Albrecht
albrek7@uw.edu
206-897-3792
Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation

Public Release: 6-Dec-2016
Nature Communications
New application of existing drug offers personalized therapy for lung cancer
A subset of lung tumors is exquisitely sensitive to a class of recently approved anti-cancer drugs. Researchers at the CeMM Research Center for Molecular Medicine of the Austrian Academy of Sciences in Vienna and the Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research in Oxford published this finding in the journal Nature Communications. It opens the way for new clinical trials in a type of cancer considered to be 'undruggable' and may lead to a therapy for up to 10 percent of lung cancer patients.
European Research Council, Moffitt Lung Cancer Center of Excellence, Austrian Science Fund, Vienna Science and Technology Fund, European Union FP7 Career Integration Grant, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Ministry of Education Youth and Sports of the Czech

Contact: Wolfgang Däuble
wdaeuble@cemm.oeaw.ac.at
43-140-160-70057
CeMM Research Center for Molecular Medicine of the Austrian Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 6-Dec-2016
Journal of Experimental Medicine
Researchers discover a new gatekeeper controlling T cell release into the bloodstream
A team of scientists led by Julie Saba, M.D., Ph.D. at UCSF Benioff Children's Hospital Oakland, has unveiled a novel role of thymic dendritic cells, which could result in new strategies to treat conditions such as autoimmune diseases, immune deficiencies, prematurity, infections, cancer, and the loss of immunity after bone marrow transplantation.
National Institutes of Health, Swim Across America, Children's Hospital Oakland Research Institute Microimaging Facility

Contact: Melinda Krigel
mkrigel@mail.cho.org
510-428-3069
Children's Hospital & Research Center Oakland

Public Release: 6-Dec-2016
58th ASH Annual Meeting
New data shed light on potential advantages of pacritinib for patients with myelofibrosis
Compared with standard therapy, pacritinib significantly reduces spleen size among people with myelofibrosis who have very low levels of platelets, according to a late-breaking study being presented today during the 58th American Society of Hematology (ASH) Annual Meeting and Exposition in San Diego.

Contact: Stephen Fitzmaurice
sfitzmaurice@hematology.org
561-506-6890
American Society of Hematology

Public Release: 6-Dec-2016
Genes & Development
What happens in the cell nucleus after fertilization
A team of scientists at the Helmholtz Zentrum München shows changes in the immediate environment of DNA after the ovum and sperm fuse to form the zygote. The results suggest why all conceivable somatic cells can develop from the germ cells. The study has been published in the journal 'Genes and Development.'

Contact: Prof. Dr. Maria Elena Torres-Padilla
torres-padilla@helmholtz-muenchen.de
49-893-187-3317
Helmholtz Zentrum München - German Research Center for Environmental Health

Public Release: 6-Dec-2016
58th ASH Annual Meeting
Side effects of leukemia drug can be safely reduced by halving dose
Patients with a chronic type of leukemia could safely reduce the side effects of life-long treatment by cutting their dose in half, according to the results of a University of Liverpool led study presented at an international conference in America this week.

Contact: Nicola Frost
nicola.frost@liverpool.ac.uk
University of Liverpool

Public Release: 6-Dec-2016
EBioMedicine
Researchers find new biomarker for brain cancer prognosis
Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center have found a new biomarker for glioma, a common type of brain cancer, that can help doctors determine how aggressive a cancer is and that could eventually help determine the best course of treatment.

Contact: Lori Sundeen Soderbergh
lori.soderbergh@utsouthwestern.edu
214-648-3404
UT Southwestern Medical Center

Public Release: 6-Dec-2016
IASLC 2016 World Conference on Lung Cancer
CTCA invited to international forum to present findings from multiple lung cancer studies
Lung cancer-based studies conducted at Cancer Treatment Centers of America® (CTCA) will be presented at the 17th International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC) World Conference on Lung Cancer in Vienna, Austria, Dec. 4-7. These studies represent research conducted by members of the research team at Western Regional Medical Center led by Dr. Glen Weiss as they search for treatment options for varying types of lung cancer.

Contact: Nicole McTheny
Nicole.mctheny@ctca-hope.com
623-207-3983
Cancer Treatment Centers of America

Public Release: 6-Dec-2016
Journal of Urology
How should patients be monitored for prostate cancer after a negative biopsy?
An expert panel of urologists and radiologists from the American Urological Association (AUA) and the Society of Abdominal Radiology (SAR) has published a set of consensus statements in The Journal of Urology® indicating that MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) targeted biopsy, when properly incorporated into clinical practice, can address such issues.

Contact: Eileen Leahy
jumedia@elsevier.com
732-238-3628
Elsevier Health Sciences

Public Release: 6-Dec-2016
IASLC 2016 World Conference on Lung Cancer
Research presentations from the IASLC 17th World Conference on Lung Cancer Dec. 6
Today's press briefing at the IASLC 17th World Conference on Lung Cancer (WCLC) focused on active prevention, with researchers sharing results of clinical drug trials that have shown reduction in risk of disease progression among lung cancer patients. Abstracts and full versions of news releases for each topic covered are available, including the complete article on the AURA3 Trial that is published in today's New England Journal of Medicine.

Contact: Chris Martin
cmartin@davidjamesgroup.com
630-670-2745
International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer

Public Release: 6-Dec-2016
British Journal of Cancer
Protein that promotes 'cell-suicide' could revolutionize eye cancer treatment
New research from the University of Liverpool has identified the role of a specific protein in the human body that can help prevent the survival and spread of eye cancer, by initiating cancer 'cell-suicide.'

Contact: Simon Wood
simon.wood@liverpool.ac.uk
44-151-794-8356
University of Liverpool

Public Release: 6-Dec-2016
Melanoma Management
Research providing promising new treatments for melanoma
In a paper published online Nov. 30, 2016, in Melanoma Management, Adam Riker, M.D., Professor of Surgery and Chief of Surgical Oncology at LSU Health New Orleans School of Medicine, reviews approaches to manage melanoma, including one tested at LSU Health New Orleans that provoked a complete response in a patient with a long history of the disease.

Contact: Leslie Capo
lcapo@lsuhsc.edu
504-568-4806
Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center

Public Release: 6-Dec-2016
Scientific Reports
Critical genes unravelled to understand human diseases and support drug discovery
A network analysis of proteins that are most important in responding to environmental signals highlights potential targets for drugs and provides better information on the genetic basis of diseases.

Contact: Hayley London
hayley.london@earlham.ac.uk
07-760-438-218
Earlham Institute

Public Release: 5-Dec-2016
58th ASH Annual Meeting
Moffitt Cancer Center study shows promising clinical activity
Immune cellular therapy is a promising new area of cancer treatment. Anti-cancer therapeutics, such as chimeric antigen receptor modified T cells, can be engineered to target tumor-associated antigens to attack and kill cancer cells. This allows for an improved precision medicine approach to treating cancer.

Contact: Lisa Chillura
Lisa.Chillura@Moffitt.org
813-745-1353
H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute

Public Release: 5-Dec-2016
IASLC 2016 World Conference on Lung Cancer
Global public health advocates open new fronts in war on tobacco
Efforts to control tobacco as a public health threat have escalated as clinicians and public health advocates have coalesced to beat back threats from tobacco companies through public advocacy, public health, and pension reform. Today, public health advocates from Brazil, Malaysia, Ireland, Australia, and Uruguay presented different strategies that have effectively reigned in the global threat of tobacco companies at a press briefing held at IASLC 17th World Conference on Lung Cancer (WCLC).

Contact: Chris Martin
cmartin@davidjamesgroup.com
630-670-2745
International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer

Public Release: 5-Dec-2016
Applied Physics Letters
NTU scientists build new ultrasound device using 3-D printing technology
Scientists from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) have developed a new ultrasound device that produces sharper images through 3-D printed lenses. With clearer images, doctors and surgeons can have greater control and precision when performing non-invasive diagnostic procedures and medical surgeries.

Contact: Amin Shah
aminshah@ntu.edu.sg
65-679-04714
Nanyang Technological University

Public Release: 5-Dec-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Pathway linked to slower aging also fuels brain cancer
While a particular metabolic pathway may slow the aging process, new research indicates a downside: That same pathway may drive brain cancer. Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found that the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) pathway is overactive in glioblastoma, a deadly form of brain cancer. Their findings suggest that tweaking the NAD+ pathway to treat glioblastoma also may affect other biological processes, such as aging.
National Institutes of Health, American Cancer Society, Concern Foundation, Duesenberg Research Fund, Genome Technology Access Center, Institute of Clinical and Translational Sciences, NIH/Roadmap for Medical Research, Molecular Imaging Center

Contact: Judy Martin Finch
martinju@wustl.edu
314-286-0105
Washington University School of Medicine

Public Release: 5-Dec-2016
Journal of American Chemical Society
UMMS scientist designs lamp light operative photodynamic molecules for tumor therapy
UMass Medical School scientist Gang Han, PhD, and his team have designed a new class of molecules used in photodynamic therapy that are able to direct lamp light deep into tissue to kill cancer tumors.

Contact: Megan Bard
megan.bard@umassmed.edu
508-856-2296
University of Massachusetts Medical School

Showing releases 1-25 out of 1223.

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