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Showing releases 1-25 out of 1340.

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Public Release: 25-Apr-2017
Urology Practice
Prostate cancer patients would pay $2,000 for more accurate biopsies, Loyola study finds
Prostate cancer patients are willing to pay up to $2,000 of their own money for a new high-tech biopsy technique that significantly improves accuracy, according to a study published in the journal Urology Practice.

Contact: Jim Ritter
jritter@lumc.edu
708-216-2445
Loyola University Health System

Public Release: 25-Apr-2017
American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology
Children conceived after fertility treatments are at increased risk for pediatric cancers
'The research concludes that the association between IVF and total pediatric neoplasms and malignancies is significant,' Prof. Sheiner says. 'With increasing numbers of offspring conceived after fertility treatments, it is important to follow up on their health.'

Contact: Andrew Lavin
andrewlavin@alavin.com
516-944-4486
American Associates, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev

Public Release: 25-Apr-2017
Journal of the American Chemical Society
Understanding the correct architectures of IMM proteins
A new study, affiliated with South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), developed a new technique to understand the correct architectures of IMM proteins, using special chemical tools.
Korea Health Technology R&D Project/Korea Health Industry Development Institute, Ministry of Health & Welfare of Korea

Contact: JooHyeon Heo
joohyeonheo@unist.ac.kr
82-522-171-223
Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology(UNIST)

Public Release: 25-Apr-2017
Nature Communications
Studying a catalyst for blood cancers
Researchers at Sylvester today published a paper in the prestigious journal Nature Communications, which describes how TET2 loss can open the door for mutations that drive myeloid, lymphoid, and other cancers.

Contact: Patrick Bartosch
PATRICK.BARTOSCH@MED.MIAMI.EDU
305-243-8219
University of Miami Miller School of Medicine

Public Release: 25-Apr-2017
Translational Psychiatry
Chemotherapy drug may increase vulnerability to depression
A chemotherapy drug used to treat brain cancer may increase vulnerability to depression by stopping new brain cells from growing, according to a new King's College London study out today in Translational Psychiatry.

Contact: Jack Stonebridge
jack.stonebridge@kcl.ac.uk
020-784-85377
King's College London

Public Release: 25-Apr-2017
Cell Reports
Environmental enrichment triggers mouse wound repair response
Living in a stimulating environment has a wide range of health benefits in humans and has even been shown to fight cancer in mice, but the underlying mechanisms have been unclear. A study published April 25 in Cell Reports reveals that cognitive stimulation, social interactions, and physical activity increase lifespan in mice with colon cancer by triggering the body's wound repair response.

Contact: Joseph Caputo
jcaputo@cell.com
617-397-2802
Cell Press

Public Release: 25-Apr-2017
JAMA
Patients with positive fecal screening test, sooner is better for colonoscopy
The risk of colorectal cancer increased significantly when colonoscopy was delayed by more than nine months following a positive fecal screening test, according to a large Kaiser Permanente study published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Contact: Heather Platisha
heather.platisha@creation.io
415-262-5992
Kaiser Permanente

Public Release: 25-Apr-2017
OncoImmunology
Potential new treatment for kidney failure in cancer patients
Kidney dysfunction is a frequent complication affecting more than 50 percent of all cancer patients, and is directly linked to poor survival. Despite the high occurrence, it is still not clear how presence of a tumor contributes to kidney dysfunction and how this can be prevented. A new study from researchers at Uppsala University shows that kidney dysfunction can be caused by the patient's own immune system, 'tricked' by the tumor to become activated.

Contact: Anna-Karin Olsson
anna-karin.olsson@imbim.uu.se
46-184-714-399
Uppsala University

Public Release: 25-Apr-2017
PLOS ONE
Ancient stress response provides clues to cancer resistance
Cancer cells deploy an ancient mechanism used by single-celled organisms to elevate their mutation rate in response to stress. This discovery explains one of the best-known hallmarks of cancer -- its high mutation rate, which contributes to the rapid evolution of drug resistance.

Contact: Joseph Caspermeyer
Joseph.Caspermeyer@asu.edu
Arizona State University

Public Release: 25-Apr-2017
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
'Cyclops' algorithm spots daily rhythms in cells
Humans, like virtually all other complex organisms on Earth, have adapted to their planet's 24-hour cycle of sunlight and darkness. That circadian rhythm is reflected in human behavior, of course, but also in the molecular workings of our cells. Now scientists have developed a powerful tool for detecting and characterizing those molecular rhythms -- a tool that could have many new medical applications.
Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, NIH/National Institute on Aging, and Penn Genome Frontiers Institute/Pennsylvania Department of Health

Contact: Karen Kreeger
karen.kreeger@uphs.upenn.edu
215-459-0544
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 25-Apr-2017
Surgery
Higher costs for complex cancer surgery indicator for worse care
Higher costs for complex cancer surgery may be an indicator for worse -- rather than better -- quality of care, according to new research by experts at Rice University and the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. Their findings are published in the journal Surgery and provide multiple implications for care delivery.

Contact: Jeff Falk
jfalk@rice.edu
713-348-6775
Rice University

Public Release: 25-Apr-2017
Genes & Development
UVA finds way to speed search for cancer cures dramatically
A new technique will let a single cancer research lab do the work of dozens, dramatically accelerating the search for new treatments and cures. And the technique will benefit not just cancer research but research into every disease driven by gene mutations, from cystic fibrosis to Alzheimer's disease.
National Natural Science Foundation of China, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, National Honor Scientist Program of Korea, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Josh Barney
jdb9a@virginia.edu
434-906-8864
University of Virginia Health System

Public Release: 25-Apr-2017
Journal of Bone Oncology
New guidance for management of aromatase-inhibitor related bone loss in breast cancer
Women treated with aromatase-inhibitors (AI) for breast cancer experience a two to four-fold increase in bone loss compared to the normal rate of bone loss with menopause -- and as a result they are at heightened risk of fracture. This new Position Statement, jointly published by seven international and European organizations, identifies fracture-related risk factors in these patients and outlines key management strategies to help prevent bone loss and fractures.

Contact: L. Misteli
lmisteli@iofbonehealth.org
41-229-940-100
International Osteoporosis Foundation

Public Release: 25-Apr-2017
2017 ASCO Annual Meeting
TGen-HonorHealth study: High rate of tumor shrinkage among pancreatic cancer patients
Adding cisplatin to standard gemcitabine/nab-paclitaxel drug treatment provided a very high rate of tumor shrinkage for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer, according to the results of a pilot clinical trial conducted by the HonorHealth Research Institute and the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen). These statistically significant and clinically meaningful improvements in overall response and survival rates resulted from a phase Ib/II clinical study performed at the HonorHealth Research Institute, a partnership of HonorHealth and TGen.
Stand Up To Cancer, Mattress Firm, Arizona Diamondbacks, and Seena Magowitz Foundation

Contact: Steve Yozwiak
syozwiak@tgen.org
602-343-8704
The Translational Genomics Research Institute

Public Release: 25-Apr-2017
ACS Environmental Science and Technology
College students exposed to toxic flame retardants in dust from dormitory furnishings
A new study shows that students living in college dormitories are exposed to high levels of toxic flame retardants in dust. In the analysis, led by Silent Spring Institute, scientists measured dozens of flame retardants in dorm dust samples, including carcinogens, hormone disruptors, and chemicals that affect brain function. The results also included some of the highest levels ever reported.
John Merck Fund, Hoffman Program on Chemicals and Health at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Fine Fund, Silent Spring Institute

Contact: Alexandra Goho
goho@silentspring.org
617-332-4288 x232
Silent Spring Institute

Public Release: 25-Apr-2017
Journal of Experimental Botany
Ammonium nitrogen input increases the synthesis of anticarcinogenic compounds in broccoli
In the quest for less contaminating fertilizing strategies, a study by the UPV/EHU has explored the use of ammonium-based fertilizers, less widely used than the nitrate for fertilizing owing to the reduced growth displayed by the plants. The comparison between these two sources of nitrogen has revealed a higher amount of glucosinolates in the case of ammonium nutrition. This gives the plants greater insecticidal capacity and this is of great interest nutritionally as these are anticarcinogenic substances.

Contact: Matxalen Sotillo
komunikazioa@ehu.eus
34-688-673-770
University of the Basque Country

Public Release: 25-Apr-2017
Health Psychology
Bad feelings can motivate cancer patients
Feeling down is a common side effect of being diagnosed with cancer. Anxiety, guilt, and distress often come hand-in-hand with diagnosis and treatment. But a recent study by researchers from Concordia and the University of Toronto shows that these seemingly negative emotions can actually be good for patients.

Contact: Marisa Lancione
marisa.lancione@concordia.ca
438-990-4536
Concordia University

Public Release: 24-Apr-2017
CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians
Growing body of evidence supports use of mind-body therapies in breast cancer treatment
In newly updated clinical guidelines from the Society for Integrative Oncology (SIO), researchers at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health and colleagues analyzed which integrative treatments are most effective and safe for patients with breast cancer. This systematic review adds to the growing literature on integrative therapies for patients with breast cancer and other cancer populations.

Contact: Stephanie Berger
sb2247@columbia.edu
212-305-4372
Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health

Public Release: 24-Apr-2017
Medical Image Analysis
Robot radiology: Low-cost AI could screen for cervical cancer better than humans
A result of 10 years work, Lehigh University's Sharon Xiaolei Huang and her team have created a cervical cancer screening technique that, based on an analysis of a very large dataset, has the potential to perform as well or better than human interpretation on other traditional screening results, such as Pap tests and HPV tests -- at a much lower cost. The technique could be used in less-developed countries, where 80 percent of deaths from cervical cancer occur.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Library of Medicine, Lister Hill National Center for Biomedical Communications

Contact: Lori Friedman
lof214@lehigh.edu
610-758-3224
Lehigh University

Public Release: 24-Apr-2017
Nature Nanotechnology
Nanoparticle vaccine shows potential as immunotherapy to fight multiple cancer types
Researchers from UT Southwestern Medical Center have developed a first-of-its-kind nanoparticle vaccine immunotherapy that targets several different cancer types.

Contact: Lori Sundeen Soderbergh
lori.soderbergh@utsouthwestern.edu
214-648-3404
UT Southwestern Medical Center

Public Release: 24-Apr-2017
Journal of Health Economics
A cancer in the family: One spouse's diagnosis can lower household income
Caring for a husband or wife with cancer significantly diminishes family income, according to researchers from the University of Georgia, who tracked changes in employment and income among working-age couples in Canada.

Contact: Vincent Pohl
pohl@uga.edu
706-271-6294
University of Georgia

Public Release: 24-Apr-2017
Journal of Health Communication
Images of health risks make indoor tanning messages more effective
UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers report in a new study that anti-tanning bed messages with images showing longer-term health effects, such as skin cancer or wrinkles, produced greater negative emotional reactions and higher ratings of effectiveness in a survey of female college students.

Contact: Laura Oleniacz
laura_oleniacz@med.unc.edu
919-445-4219
UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center

Public Release: 24-Apr-2017
Cell
Does the microbiome play a role in the effectiveness of colorectal cancer treatment?
A study by UMass Medical School shows that C. elegans, fed a diet of E. coli bacteria, are 100 times more sensitive to the chemotherapy drug floxuridine, commonly used to treat colon cancer, than worms fed different bacteria. These findings suggest that the bacteria residing in your digestive tract may play an important role in your ability to respond to chemotherapy.

Contact: Jim Fessenden
james.fessenden@umassmed.edu
508-856-2688
University of Massachusetts Medical School

Public Release: 24-Apr-2017
Journal of Urology
Mayo research shows surgery adds years for kidney cancer patients
Mayo Clinic researchers have discovered that surgery could more than double life expectancy for many patients with late-stage kidney cancer, giving them anywhere from two to almost 10 years more than they'd have without the surgery. A paper, published recently in The Journal of Urology, found a 'clinically meaningful difference in survival' between renal cell carcinoma patients who had surgery to completely remove secondary tumor growths, called metastases, compared to those who didn't.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Adam Harringa
newsbureau@mayo.edu
507-284-5005
Mayo Clinic

Public Release: 24-Apr-2017
Cancer Medicine
Gallbladder cancer rates decreasing in men, not women; late-stage diagnosis on the rise
Gallbladder cancer is a rare, but aggressive disease. A new study by University of Missouri School of Medicine researchers has found that gallbladder cancer rates have decreased in men in recent years but not in women. The researchers also found that more people are being diagnosed with late-stage disease.
Raymond E. and Vaona H. Peck Endowment to the Department of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology at MU School of Medicine

Contact: Jeff Hoelscher
hoelscherj@missouri.edu
573-884-1608
University of Missouri-Columbia

Showing releases 1-25 out of 1340.

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