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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 101-125 out of 914.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 > >>

Public Release: 20-Jul-2016
Biomedical Optics Express
New probe developed for improved high resolution measurement of brain temperature
In a new paper published in Biomedical Optics Express, from The Optical Society (OSA), Stefan Musolino of the University of Adelaide and the ARC Centre of Excellence for Nanoscale BioPhotonics, Australia, and his colleagues describe a new optical fiber-based probe capable of making pinpoint brain temperature measurements in moving lab animals.

Contact: Rebecca Andersen
The Optical Society

Public Release: 20-Jul-2016
Ecology Letters
North American forests unlikely to save us from climate change, study finds
An unprecedented study combining projections of future climate with more than two million tree-ring records spanning all of North America suggests that forests ache more and more under the burden of climate change. The resulting detailed forecast map for the continent reveals up to 75 percent slower growth projected for trees in the southwestern US, along the Rockies, through interior Canada and Alaska.
Aspen Center for Environmental Studies, University of Arizona College of Science

Contact: Doug Carroll
University of Arizona

Public Release: 19-Jul-2016
Nature Biotechnology
Big data for small cells
Neuherberg, Germany & Basel, July 19, 2016. Working with colleagues from the ETH Zürich, scientists at the Helmholtz Zentrum München and the Technical University of Munich have developed software that allows observing cells for weeks while also measuring molecular properties. The software is freely available and has now been introduced in 'Nature Biotechnology'.

Contact: Prof. Dr. Dr. Fabian Theis
Helmholtz Zentrum München - German Research Center for Environmental Health

Public Release: 19-Jul-2016
Molecular Biology and Evolution
Where the buffalo have evolutionarily roamed
Once almost wiped out from existence, the mighty bison has recovered to become a symbol of pride for the American West and European conversation efforts. Now, scientists Mathieu Gautier, Laurence Flori et al. have shown that the conservation plan and subsequent management practices have been efficient to recover a reasonable amount of bison genetic variability, revealed a rich evolutionary history, and more 400 genes unique to bison adaptation.

Contact: Joe Caspermeyer
Molecular Biology and Evolution (Oxford University Press)

Public Release: 18-Jul-2016
Applied and Environmental Microbiology
New ORNL tool probes for genes linked to toxic methylmercury
Environmental scientists can more efficiently detect genes required to convert mercury in the environment into more toxic methylmercury with molecular probes developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

Contact: Ron Walli
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 18-Jul-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
New method of calculating protein interaction to speed up drug development
Incorrect behavior of proteins in cells is a cause of many dangerous illnesses, such as cancer or the Alzheimer's disease. Understanding protein-protein interactions is essential for finding the cure to them. Scientists from MIPT have created a new method to predict possible protein configurations in cells, which is a hundred times faster than any of the previously developed algorithms. This fact makes the algorithm a viable substitution to an experimental approach.
Ministry of Education and Science of the Russian Federation

Contact: Sergey Divakov
Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology

Public Release: 18-Jul-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Lemur DNA paints a picture of Madagascar's forested past
While there's no question that human activities such as logging and slash-and-burn agriculture have dramatically altered Madagascar's forests since the first settlers arrived about 2,000 years ago, just how much of the island was forested before people got there remains a matter of debate. Now, a DNA study of tree-dwelling mouse lemurs suggests that humans did not arrive to find the island as blanketed by forests as frequently assumed.
National Science Foundation, Duke Tropical Conservation Initiative

Contact: Robin Ann Smith
Duke University

Public Release: 15-Jul-2016
'Noah's Ark' ex silico
An international team of researchers is enlisting supercomputing to help better predict where plants and animals might end up under the effects of climate change. The project will model climate change-related shifts of species and ecosystems to suggest placement of protected areas for the future.
Global Environment Facility, National Science Foundation

Contact: Doug Carroll
University of Arizona

Public Release: 14-Jul-2016
PLOS Computational Biology
IU research points towards new blindness prevention methods in diabetic eye disease
Indiana University researchers have created a virtual tissue model of diabetes in the eye that shows precisely how a small protein that can both damage or grow blood vessels in the eye causes vision loss and blindness in people with diabetes. The study, reported in the journal PLOS Computational Biology, could also lead to better treatment for diabetic retinopathy, which currently requires multiple, invasive procedures that aren't always effective in the long term.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Kevin Fryling
Indiana University

Public Release: 14-Jul-2016
International team launches community competition to find how cancer changes a cell's RNA
An open challenge will merge the efforts of the International Cancer Genome Consortium, The Cancer Genome Atlas, and the NCI Cloud Pilots with Sage Bionetworks and the open science DREAM Challenge community.

Contact: Rhea Cohen
Ontario Institute for Cancer Research

Public Release: 14-Jul-2016
Current Drug Discovery Technology
Researchers identify the requirements in the chemical structure to develop better molecules in cancer
Researchers from Dr. H.S. Gour University and Jadavapur University in India have found out structural requirements of some theophylline based molecules against the enzyme aldehyde dehydrogenase.

Contact: Madiha Hussain
Bentham Science Publishers

Public Release: 11-Jul-2016
Environmental Science and Technology
Weathered oil in Gulf of Mexico may threaten development of fish embryos and larvae
The Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill, in which nearly three million barrels of crude oil got released in 2010 into the northern Gulf of Mexico, contaminated the spawning habitats for many fishes. A research team led by an environmental scientist at the University of California, Riverside has now found that ultraviolet light is changing the structure of the DWH oil components into something more toxic, further threatening numerous commercially and ecologically important fishes.
Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative

Contact: Iqbal Pittalwala
University of California - Riverside

Public Release: 11-Jul-2016
Biodiversity Data Journal
More assassins on the radar: As many as 24 new species of assassin bugs described
As many as 24 assassin bugs new to science were discovered by Dr. Guanyang Zhang and his team. In their article, published in the open access Biodiversity Data Journal, they describe the new insects along with treating another 47 assassin bugs in the same genus. To do this, the scientists examined more than 10,000 specimens, coming from both museum collections and newly undertaken field trips.

Contact: Dr Guanyang Zhang
Pensoft Publishers

Public Release: 11-Jul-2016
Nature Communications
Open chromatin profiling key to identifying leukemia cells of origin
Researchers have found a precise and reliable way -- whole-genome profiling of open chromatin -- to identify the kind of cell that leads to a given case of leukemia, a valuable key to cancer prognosis and outcome.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Joyce Peterson
Jackson Laboratory

Public Release: 8-Jul-2016
Nature Biotechnology
Web-based data tool designed to enhance drug safety
A new online open-access database has been developed by scientists to allow the clinical responses of more than 5 million patients to all FDA-approved drugs to be used to identify unexpected clinical harm, benefits and alternative treatment choices for individual patients.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Jim Feuer
Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center

Public Release: 7-Jul-2016
Research aims to grasp complexities in plant-pollinator networks across tallgrass prairies
University of Kansas graduate student Kathy Denning has earned a grant from the National Science Foundation to support research centering on molecular genetic analysis of pollen grains recovered from bees across 10 prairie sites in Kansas.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Brendan M. Lynch
University of Kansas

Public Release: 7-Jul-2016
Vanderbilt chosen for leadership role in NIH precision medicine initiative cohort program
Vanderbilt University Medical Center has been chosen by the National Institutes of Health to be the Data and Research Support Center for the Precision Medicine Initiative Cohort Program, a landmark study of genetic, environmental and lifestyle factors affecting the health of a million or more people, federal officials have announced.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Craig Boerner
Vanderbilt University Medical Center

Public Release: 7-Jul-2016
Joint forces to enhance access to biodiversity monitoring data
Combining forces, two EU projects, EuMon and EU BON, are set to compile the largest data collection on biodiversity monitoring activities in Europe to date. Using existing biodiversity data and metadata collected by the two projects, the initiative is a stepping stone in completing a comprehensive European Biodiversity Portal. The projects now call out to monitoring programs across the Old Continent and beyond, to join in, provide information about their schemes and share their expertise.

Contact: Dr. Klaus Henle
Pensoft Publishers

Public Release: 7-Jul-2016
JCI Insight
Various miRNAs predict the effect of anti-angiogenic agents on renal cancer
CNIO researchers have come across various potential predictive biomarkers of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) -- a type of anti-angiogenic agent widely used -- response in metastatic renal cancer. In their study, published in JCI Insight, the researchers identify various miRNAs that define a group of patients with the poorest response to TKI treatment and with the worst prognosis. The study, conducted on 139 patient samples, is the most robust to date in renal cell carcinoma.
Mutua Madrileña Foundation, Pfizer, Fund for Health Research Project, Spanish Ministry of Economy, Competitiveness

Contact: Nuria Noriega
Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Oncológicas (CNIO)

Public Release: 7-Jul-2016
Cancer cell lines predict drug response
A discovery that cancer cell lines can be used to predict how a tumor is likely to respond to a drug has implications for developing new, personalized treatments.
Wellcome Trust, European Molecular Biology Laboratory, NIH/National Cancer Institute, Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research, EU/Seventh Framework Programme, La Fundació la Marató de TV3, European Research Council

Contact: Mary Todd Bergman
European Molecular Biology Laboratory - European Bioinformatics Institute

Public Release: 6-Jul-2016
'Omics' data improves breast cancer survival prediction
Precise predictions of whether a tumor is likely to spread would help clinicians and patients choose the best course of treatment. But current methods fall short of the precision needed. New research reveals that profiling primary tumor samples using genomic technologies can improve the accuracy of breast cancer survival predictions compared to clinical information alone. The study was published in the journal GENETICS, a publication of the Genetics Society of America.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, American Cancer Society, University of Alabama at Birmingham-Comprehensive Cancer Center

Contact: Cristy Gelling
Genetics Society of America

Public Release: 6-Jul-2016
Research Ideas & Outcomes
Biodiversity data import from historical literature assessed in an EMODnet Workshop Report
Information on species occurrences through the centuries is crucial for adopting timely measures against biodiversity loss. However, as abundant as information currently is, much of the actual data are effectively inaccessible. Therefore, data managers, who implement data archaeology and rescue activities, along with external experts in data mobilization and publication, were brought together for the European Marine Observation and Data network Workshop. The event is reported in the open access journal Research Ideas and Outcomes.

Contact: Sarah Faulwetter
Pensoft Publishers

Public Release: 6-Jul-2016
Anatomy of a decision
A new atlas of gene expression during the earliest stages of life boosts studies of development.
Wellcome Trust, European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council, Medical Research Council

Contact: Mary Todd Bergman
European Molecular Biology Laboratory - European Bioinformatics Institute

Public Release: 5-Jul-2016
Integrative and Comparative Biology
Researchers tally huge number of venomous fishes, tout potential for medical therapies
A paper appearing this week in the journal Integrative and Comparative Biology catalogs instances of venomous aquatic life, for the first time showing that venom has evolved 18 separate times in fresh and saltwater fishes.

Contact: Brendan M. Lynch
University of Kansas

Public Release: 5-Jul-2016
Nature Nanotechnology
From super to ultra-resolution microscopy
A team at Harvard's Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering has, for the first time, been able to tell apart features distanced only 5 nanometers from each other in a densely packed, single molecular structure and to achieve the so far highest resolution in optical microscopy. Reported on July 4 in a study in Nature Nanotechnology, the technology, also called 'discrete molecular imaging', enhances the team's DNA nanotechnology-powered super-resolution microscopy platform with an integrated set of new imaging methods.

Contact: Benjamin Boettner
Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard

Showing releases 101-125 out of 914.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 > >>