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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 226-250 out of 966.

<< < 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 > >>

Public Release: 28-Dec-2017
National Research Award 2017 to Roderic Guigó
Roderic Guigó, coordinator of the Bioinformatics and Genomics Programme at the Centre for Genomic Regulation (CRG) in Barcelona, has been honored with the highest recognition for research excellence in Catalonia.

Contact: Laia Cendros
laia.cendros@crg.eu
34-607-611-798
Center for Genomic Regulation

Public Release: 21-Dec-2017
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Making waves
New approach enables measurements of changes in thousands of proteins in the minutes after frog eggs are fertilized, revealing previously opaque mechanisms such as how the destruction of a small number of proteins releases the 'brakes' on an egg's cell cycle. Method has applications in a wide range of biological systems.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Kevin Jiang
kevin_jiang@hms.harvard.edu
617-432-2003
Harvard Medical School

Public Release: 21-Dec-2017
How trees cooperate: MLU secures funding for international research training group
A new international research training group at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg focuses on how trees interact with each other and on the consequences of these interactions for the ecosystem. The Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Foundation, DFG) will be funding the Ph.D. program for the next four-and-a-half years with around €3.5 million. MLU is collaborating with the University of Chinese Academy of Sciences in Beijing for this project.
Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft

Contact: Tom Leonhardt
tom.leonhardt@rektorat.uni-halle.de
49-345-552-1438
Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg

Public Release: 21-Dec-2017
Science
An integrated assessment of vascular plants species of the Americas
Missouri Botanical Garden researcher Dr. Carmen Ulloa is the lead author of 'An Integrated Assessment of Vascular Plant Species of the Americas,' published today in Science. Ulloa along with 23 co-authors compiled a comprehensive, searchable checklist of 124,993 species, 6,227 genera and 355 families of vascular plants of the Americas. This represents one third of all known vascular plants worldwide.

Contact: Katie O'Sullivan
katie.osullivan@mobot.org
314-577-0254
Missouri Botanical Garden

Public Release: 20-Dec-2017
Nature Communications
When one reference genome is not enough
Having plant pan-genomes for crops that are important for fuel and food applications would enable breeders to harness natural diversity to improve traits such as yield, disease resistance, and tolerance of marginal growing conditions. In Nature Communications, an international team led by researchers at the Joint Genome Institute gauged the size of a plant pan-genome using Brachypodium distachyon, a wild grass widely used as a model for grain and biomass crops.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: David Gilbert
degilbert@lbl.gov
DOE/Joint Genome Institute

Public Release: 20-Dec-2017
The biological clock of plants
The Americans Jeffrey C. Hall, Michael Rosbash, and Michael W. Young were awarded the Nobel Prize for Medicine and Physiology for their research on the biological clock on Sunday. They discovered the molecular mechanisms controlling biological rhythms. A new 'research_tv' report describes how scientists at Bielefeld are also advancing research on the biological clock.

Contact: Dr. Dorothee Staiger
dorothee.staiger@uni-bielefeld.de
49-521-106-5609
Bielefeld University

Public Release: 20-Dec-2017
EMBO to support life scientists in Chile
EMBO, together with its intergovernmental funding body, EMBC, has signed a cooperation agreement with the National Commission for Scientific and Technological Research in Chile (CONICYT) to strengthen scientific exchange and collaboration between Chile and Europe.

Contact: Tilmann Kiessling
communications@embo.org
EMBO

Public Release: 20-Dec-2017
BMC Genomics
Mobile genetic elements that alter the function of nearby genes are detected
Raúl Castanera-Andrés, an engineer in the Agri-Food Engineering and Rural Environment Department of the NUP/UPNA-Public University of Navarre, has worked on detecting mobile genetic elements (transposons) in basidiomycete fungi, a type of well-known fungi because they produce edible mushrooms and are active degraders of lignocellulosic waste.

Contact: Oihane Lakar
o.lakar@elhuyar.eus
0034-943-363-040
Elhuyar Fundazioa

Public Release: 20-Dec-2017
Nature
Political instability and weak governance lead to loss of species, study finds
Big data study of global biodiversity shows ineffective national governance is a better indicator of species decline than any other measure of 'anthropogenic impact.' Even protected conservation areas make little difference in countries that struggle with socio-political stability.

Contact: Fred Lewsey
fred.lewsey@admin.cam.ac.uk
44-122-376-5566
University of Cambridge

Public Release: 20-Dec-2017
Science Advances
Study warns that snake fungal disease could be a global threat
New research suggests that a potentially fatal snake fungus found in several species in the United States and three in Europe could be global in scale. The study shows that the snake fungal disease caused by Ophidiomyces ophidiodiicola can infect snakes of many species regardless of their ancestry, physical characteristics, or habitats. The study's authors warn that future surveys for the disease should assume that all snake species harbor this pathogen.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Kendra Snyder
ksnyder@amnh.org
212-496-3419
American Museum of Natural History

Public Release: 19-Dec-2017
Nature Genetics
A functional genomics database for plant microbiome studies
Most of the interaction between microbes and plants occurs at the interface between the roots and soil. In Nature Genetics, a team led by JGI researchers isolated novel bacteria from plant root environments and combined the new genomes with thousands of publicly available genomes representing the major groups of plant-associated bacteria, and bacteria from plant and non-plant environments. Through the resulting database, researchers identified genes enriched in the genomes of plant-associated and root-associated organisms.
US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: David Gilbert
degilbert@lbl.gov
DOE/Joint Genome Institute

Public Release: 19-Dec-2017
Biophysical Society 62nd Annual Meeting
Biophysical Society Announces winners of 2018 Education Committee Travel Awards
The Biophysical Society has announced the winners of its Education Committee Travel Awards to attend the Biophysical Society's 62nd Annual Meeting in San Francisco, Calif., Feb. 17-21, 2018. The recipients of this competitive award, all of whom are students and postdoctoral fellows, are selected based on scientific merit. Each awardee will be presenting their research during the meeting, will receive a travel grant, and will be recognized at a reception on Saturday, Feb. 21, at the Moscone Center.

Contact: Ellen Weiss
eweiss@biophysics.org
301-571-8943
Biophysical Society

Public Release: 19-Dec-2017
Nucleic Acids Research
New approaches in medical genomics: A step forward in Parkinson's disease
Researchers at the Centre for Genomic Regulation (CRG) in Barcelona have discovered a mechanism regulating an important protein that is linked to Parkinson´s disease and multiple system atrophy (MSA). They have identified factors controlling the production of this protein and revealed mechanisms by which it leads to neurotoxicity. These results, which have been published this week in Nucleic Acids Research, point to new biomarkers that might help in the early detection of these diseases, as well as in exploring possible treatments.
Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness , CERCA Programme, Generalitat de Catalunya, European Research Council, Fundació la Marató de TV3

Contact: Laia Cendros
laia.cendros@crg.eu
34-607-611-798
Center for Genomic Regulation

Public Release: 19-Dec-2017
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Researchers isolate biting, non-biting genes in pitcher plant mosquitoes
Understanding that divergence, University of Notre Dame researchers say, is a starting point to determining whether there are non-biting genes in other species that could be manipulated in order to reduce transmission of vector-borne diseases.

Contact: Jessica Sieff
jsieff@nd.edu
574-631-3933
University of Notre Dame

Public Release: 18-Dec-2017
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Researchers begin isolating blood-feeding and non-biting genes in mosquitoes
Researchers have taken the first step on a path that eventually could result in female mosquitoes that no longer bite and spread diseases. A nine-member team of scientists at five institutions methodically sorted out 902 genes related to blood feeding and 478 genes linked to non-blood feeding from the mosquito Wyeomyia smithii.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Jim Barlow
jebarlow@uoregon.edu
541-346-3481
University of Oregon

Public Release: 18-Dec-2017
Nature Ecology and Evolution
Making larvae count
Genetic barcodes are used to quantify crucial populations in a coral reef ecosystem.

Contact: Yael Edelman
yael.edelman@weizmann.ac.il
Weizmann Institute of Science

Public Release: 18-Dec-2017
Nature Ecology & Evolution
Birds learn from each other's 'disgust,' enabling insects to evolve bright colors
A new study of TV-watching great tits reveals how they learn through observation. Social interactions within a predator species can have 'evolutionary consequences' for potential prey, such as the conspicuous warning colors of insects like ladybirds.

Contact: Fred Lewsey
fred.lewsey@admin.cam.ac.uk
44-122-376-5566
University of Cambridge

Public Release: 18-Dec-2017
EMBO Installation Grants support establishment of 7 laboratories across Europe
EMBO announces today seven life scientists as recipients of EMBO Installation Grants. These grants will support the early-career researchers in establishing their independent laboratories in the Czech Republic, Estonia, Poland, Portugal and Turkey.
European Molecular Biology Organization

Contact: Tilmann Kiessling
communications@embo.org
EMBO

Public Release: 15-Dec-2017
Current Biology
Genetic study uncovers fungal sex secrets, which shed light on candidiasis
A new genetic analysis of fungal yeast infections (candidiasis) from around the world has revealed surprising secrets about how these microbes reproduce and cause disease, according to a new study published in Current Biology from researchers at the Centre for Genomic Regulation in Barcelona, Spain.

Contact: Laia Cendros
laia.cendros@crg.eu
34-607-611-798
Center for Genomic Regulation

Public Release: 14-Dec-2017
Science
Single-stranded DNA and RNA origami go live
A novel approach published in Science by a collaborative team of researchers from the Wyss Institute, Arizona State University, and Autodesk for the first time enables the design of complex single-stranded DNA and RNA origami that can autonomously fold into diverse, stable, user-defined structures.

Contact: Benjamin Boettner
Benjamin.Boettner@wyss.harvard.edu
917-913-8051
Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard

Public Release: 14-Dec-2017
Nucleic Acids Research
Supercoiling pushes molecular handcuffs along chromatin fibers
As it squeezes down the chromatin fiber, the cohesin protein complex extrudes a growing loop of DNA -- a bit like the quick-lacing system of trail-running shoes. But what is powering the movement of the protein? A team of SIB scientists has found that the driving force could be the supercoiling of upstream DNA. Their research, published in Nucleic Acids Research, is thereby adding a key piece to the puzzle of gene expression regulation.

Contact: Maïa Berman
maia.berman@sib.swiss
41-216-924-054
Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics

Public Release: 14-Dec-2017
Cell
'Bet hedging' explains the efficacy of many combination cancer therapies
Survival benefits of many cancer drug combinations are not due to drug synergy, but to a form of "bet hedging." Combination treatment gives each patient multiple chances of responding to at least one drug, increasing measures of survival within patient populations. Findings suggest new ways to interpret clinical trial data, identify truly synergistic drug pairings and improve the design of combination therapies.
National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Ekaterina Pesheva
ekaterina_pesheva@hms.harvard.edu
617-432-0441
Harvard Medical School

Public Release: 14-Dec-2017
PLOS Biology
Tracking planned experiments online could spot ways to improve animal testing
An online database of study summaries could be systematically evaluated to uncover new information about animal testing, including potential targets for efforts to minimize harm to lab animals. A demonstration of this approach is publishing Dec. 14 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology.

Contact: Gilbert Schoenfelder
Gilbert.Schoenfelder@bfr.bund.de
PLOS

Public Release: 13-Dec-2017
American Epilepsy Society Annual Meeting
Novel fMRI applications in childhood epilepsy increase understanding of seizure impacts
Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has allowed researchers to map the memory functions that are often impaired within the brains of children with epilepsy. Additionally, a separate study of a novel application of resting-state fMRI, where the patient does not have to complete tasks, demonstrated the potential for clinicians to use noninvasive fMRI for language assessment for children who are too young or impaired to follow task directions in traditional fMRI studies.

Contact: Kathleen R. Lee
krlee2@childrensnational.org
301-244-6731
Children's National Health System

Public Release: 13-Dec-2017
Nature
Protein structure could unlock new treatments for cystic fibrosis
Biochemists at the University of Zurich have used cryo-electron microscopy to determine the detailed architecture of the chloride channel TMEM16A. This protein is a promising target for the development of effective drugs to treat cystic fibrosis.
European Research Council, University of Zurich, Mäxi Foundation

Contact: Raimund Dutzler
dutzler@bioc.uzh.ch
41-446-356-550
University of Zurich

Showing releases 226-250 out of 966.

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