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Disease in the Developing World

News Releases

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 201-225 out of 1340.

<< < 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 > >>

Public Release: 2-May-2017
PLOS Medicine
Controlling the HIV epidemic: A progress report on efforts in sub-Saharan Africa
In a Research Article published in PLOS Medicine, Richard Hayes of the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, UK and colleagues report on a clinical trial evaluating an intervention to achieve universal HIV testing and treatment in Zambia. The authors estimate that, after one year, the overall proportion of people with HIV receiving antiretroviral treatment (ART) had increased from 44 percent to 61 percent.

Contact: Richard Hayes
richard.hayes@lshtm.ac.uk
PLOS

Public Release: 1-May-2017
Heart Failure 2017
Risk of heart transplant rejection reduced by desensitising patient antibodies
The risk of heart transplant rejection can be reduced by desensitising patient antibodies, according to research presented today at Heart Failure 2017 and the 4th World Congress on Acute Heart Failure.1 The breakthrough comes on the 50th anniversary of heart transplantation.

Contact: ESC Press Office
press@escardio.org
European Society of Cardiology

Public Release: 1-May-2017
Health Affairs
Global aid for health leaves older adults out in the cold
Development assistance for health targets younger more than older age groups, with 90 percent of the assistance going to people below the age of 60. Children below the age of 5 receive the most development assistance for health. Development assistance for health globally was $3.13 per person younger than age 60 in recipient countries, in contrast to $0.91 per person aged 60 and older.
Robert N. Butler Columbia Aging Center, Columbia University, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation

Contact: Stephanie Berger
sb2247@columbia.edu
212-305-4372
Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health

Public Release: 1-May-2017
AATS Centennial
Humanitarian cardiac surgery outreach helps build a better health care system in Rwanda
This year's AATS Centennial, the annual meeting of the American Association for Thoracic Surgery, features a presentation from a team of doctors and other medical professionals who have been travelling to Rwanda for the past 10 years as part of a surgical outreach program aimed at treating patients affected by rheumatic heart disease (RHD) and building a foundation for sustainable cardiothoracic care throughout the country.
St. Jude Medical, Inc., Medtronic, Edwards Lifesciences, Livanova, OnX, Inc., Ethicon, Inc., and Scanlan International

Contact: Lisa McEvoy
lmcevoy@aats.org
978-252-2200 x521
American Association for Thoracic Surgery

Public Release: 30-Apr-2017
Heart Failure 2017
Unemployment associated with 50 percent higher risk of death in heart failure patients
Unemployment is associated with a 50 percent higher risk of death in patients with heart failure, according to research presented today at Heart Failure 2017 and the 4th World Congress on Acute Heart Failure.1 The observational study in more than 20,000 heart failure patients found that not being employed was linked with a greater likelihood of death than history of diabetes or stroke.

Contact: ESC Press Office
press@escardio.org
European Society of Cardiology

Public Release: 30-Apr-2017
Heart Failure 2017
Non-O blood groups associated with higher risk of heart attack
Having a non-O blood group is associated with a higher risk of heart attack, according to research presented today at Heart Failure 2017 and the 4th World Congress on Acute Heart Failure.
NWO VIDI

Contact: ESC Press Office
press@escardio.org
European Society of Cardiology

Public Release: 29-Apr-2017
Heart Failure 2017
The Lancet
Serelaxin fails to meet primary endpoints in phase 3 RELAX-AHF-2 trial
Serelaxin has failed to meet the primary endpoints of the phase 3 RELAX-AHF-2 trial, according to late breaking results presented for the first time today at Heart Failure 2017 and the 4th World Congress on Acute Heart Failure.
Novartis, Cardiorentis

Contact: ESC Press Office
press@escardio.org
European Society of Cardiology

Public Release: 28-Apr-2017
Cell
Zika virus persists in the central nervous system and lymph nodes of rhesus monkeys
Zika virus can persist in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), lymph nodes and colorectal tissue of infected rhesus monkeys for weeks after the virus has been cleared from blood, urine and mucosal secretions, according to a study published online in Cell. The research was led by Dan H. Barouch, M.D., Ph.D., and colleagues at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School and was funded in part by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Jennifer Routh
jennifer.routh@nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 27-Apr-2017
$9.6 million grant fuels UCI malaria control research in Africa
A University of California, Irvine study on the impact of environmental changes on malaria in sub-Saharan Africa has been awarded up to $9.6 million over seven years from the National Institute of Allergy & Infectious Diseases, a part of the National Institutes of Health.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy & Infectious Diseases

Contact: Tom Vasich
tmvasich@uci.edu
949-824-6455
University of California - Irvine

Public Release: 27-Apr-2017
The Lancet
Shortage of essential diphtheria treatment drugs needs international action, experts warn
International action is needed to tackle a global shortage of medicine in Western nations which could hinder the ability of doctors to treat diphtheria, experts have warned.

Contact: Kerra Maddern
k.l.maddern@exeter.ac.uk
07-814-997-578
University of Exeter

Public Release: 27-Apr-2017
PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases
Blood test predicts kids at risk for dengue shock syndrome
The most serious, life-threatening complication of dengue infection is dengue shock syndrome (DSS), seen primarily in children. Daily platelet counts in children in the early stages of dengue can predict those most at risk for DSS, researchers report in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases.

Contact: PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases
plosntds@plos.org
PLOS

Public Release: 26-Apr-2017
Building Research & Information
Study finds major health benefits linked to indoor temperature variation
Exposure to environments outside a comfortable temperature could help tackle major metabolic diseases, such as diabetes and obesity.

Contact: Krystina Sihdu
newsroom@taylorandfrancis.com
020-701-76928
Taylor & Francis Group

Public Release: 25-Apr-2017
Scientific Reports
Managing disease spread through accessible modeling
A new computer modeling study from Los Alamos National Laboratory is aimed at making epidemiological models more accessible and useful for public-health collaborators and improving disease-related decision making.
Defense Threat Reduction Agency

Contact: Nancy Ambrosiano
nwa@lanl.gov
505-667-0471
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Public Release: 25-Apr-2017
Centennial Celebration of Bacteriophage Research
Novel phage therapy saves patient with multidrug-resistant bacterial infection
Scientists and physicians at University of California San Diego School of Medicine, working with colleagues at the US Navy Medical Research Center -- Biological Defense Research Directorate (NMRC-BDRD), Texas A&M University, a San Diego-based biotech and elsewhere, have successfully used an experimental therapy involving bacteriophages -- viruses that target and consume specific strains of bacteria -- to treat a patient near death from a multidrug-resistant bacterium.

Contact: Scott LaFee
slafee@ucsd.edu
858-249-0456
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 25-Apr-2017
Radiology
Artificial intelligence may help diagnose tuberculosis in remote areas
Researchers are training artificial intelligence models to identify tuberculosis (TB) on chest X-rays, which may help screening and evaluation efforts in TB-prevalent areas with limited access to radiologists, according to a new study.

Contact: Linda Brooks
lbrooks@rsna.org
630-590-7762
Radiological Society of North America

Public Release: 24-Apr-2017
Phytomedicine
Patients with drug-resistant malaria cured by plant therapy developed at WPI
When the standard malaria medications failed to help 18 critically ill patients, the attending physician in a Congo clinic acted under the 'compassionate use' doctrine and prescribed a not-yet-approved malaria therapy made only from the dried leaves of the Artemisia annua plant. In just five days, all 18 people fully recovered. This small but stunningly successful trial is detailed in a new paper in Phytomedicine by lead author Pamela Weathers at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI).

Contact: Michael Dorsey
mwdorsey@wpi.edu
508-831-5609
Worcester Polytechnic Institute

Public Release: 24-Apr-2017
European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases
Measuring immune response could be key to differentiating malaria from other infections
Analyzing a patient's immune response could be key to quickly and accurately diagnosing malaria, according to research presented on World Malaria Day at the 27th European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.
Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Kerry Noble
kerry_noble@hotmail.com
44-744-686-9433
European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 24-Apr-2017
Scientific Reports
Tiny 'cages' could keep vaccines safe at high temperatures
Vaccines and antibodies could be transported and stored without refrigeration by capturing them in tiny silica 'cages', a discovery which could make getting vital medicines to patients much easier, cheaper and safer.
Royal Society, The Annett Trust

Contact: Chris Melvin
c.m.melvin@bath.ac.uk
44-012-253-83941
University of Bath

Public Release: 24-Apr-2017
American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
Malaria sickening thousands in US and racking up millions in healthcare costs, new study finds
A new study published today in the American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene shows that malaria led to a count of hospitalized patients and deaths that easily eclipsed other travel-related illness and generated about half a billion dollars in healthcare costs in the US over a 15-year period.

Contact: Carol Schadelbauer
carol@burness.com
301-280-5725
Burness

Public Release: 23-Apr-2017
Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B
Conservation not an effective tool for reducing infectious disease in people, study finds
A new study finds that improved human health is not a benefit of conservation -- at least when health is measured through the lens of infectious disease. The paper analyzed the relationship between infectious diseases and their environmental, demographic and economic drivers in dozens of countries over 20 years.

Contact: Michelle Ma
mcma@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 22-Apr-2017
Experimental Biology 2017
4 exciting advances in food and nutrition research
New discoveries tied to how food affects our body and why we make certain food choices could help inform nutrition plans and policies that encourage healthy food choices. The Experimental Biology 2017 meeting (EB 2017) will showcase groundbreaking research in food policy, nutrition and the biochemistry of food.

Contact: Anne Frances Johnson
media@experimentalbiology.org
571-271-1986
Experimental Biology 2017

Public Release: 21-Apr-2017
Researchers receive $9 million grant for research on drug-resistant malaria
The University of Maryland School of Medicine has been awarded a $9 million seven-year grant to develop new tools against drug-resistant malaria in Southeast Asia.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: David Kohn
dkohn@som.umaryland.edu
410-706-7590
University of Maryland School of Medicine

Public Release: 21-Apr-2017
NIH funds UC San Diego Amazonian Center of Excellence in Malaria Research
The Amazonian Center of Excellence for Malaria Research, headed by Joseph Vinetz, M.D., professor of medicine and tropical disease specialist at University of California San Diego School of Medicine, will receive up to approximately $8.3 million over seven years from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Scott LaFee
slafee@ucsd.edu
858-249-0456
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 21-Apr-2017
PLOS ONE
Sunflower seeds traced as source of toxic mold, potent liver carcinogen
Michigan State University researchers have shown that sunflower seeds are frequently contaminated with a toxin produced by molds and pose an increased health risk in many low-income countries worldwide.

Contact: Layne Cameron
layne.cameron@cabs.msu.edu
517-353-8819
Michigan State University

Public Release: 21-Apr-2017
The International Liver CongressTM 2017
WHO's Global Hepatitis Report sets baseline to eliminate viral hepatitis by 2030
The World Hepatitis Alliance today welcomes the publication of the first-ever Global Hepatitis Report by the World Health Organization (WHO), which includes new data on the prevalence and global burden of viral hepatitis.

Contact: Tara Farrell
Tara.farrell@worldhepatitisalliance.org
44-776-162-5256
World Hepatitis Alliance

Showing releases 201-225 out of 1340.

<< < 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 > >>