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Disease in the Developing World

News Releases

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 26-50 out of 1340.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 > >>

Public Release: 13-Apr-2017
PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases
Drinking iced tea may boost cholera risk in endemic countries
After more than a decade of declining cholera incidence, Vietnam faced an increase in cases of the diarrheal disease during 2007-2010. Risk factors for contracting cholera in Ben Tre province of Vietnam include drinking iced tea or unboiled water and having a water source near a toilet, researchers report in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases.

Contact: PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases
plosntds@plos.org
PLOS

Public Release: 12-Apr-2017
Analytical Sciences
On-the-range detection technology could corral bovine TB
A research breakthrough allowing the first direct, empirical, blood-based, cow-side test for diagnosing bovine tuberculosis (TB) could spare ranchers and the agriculture industry from costly quarantines and the mass slaughter of animals infected with this easily spread disease.
New Mexico Small Business Assistance, US Department of Agriculture, Los Alamos Research and Development Directed Research Program

Contact: Nancy Ambrosiano
nwa@lanl.gov
505-667-0471
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Public Release: 12-Apr-2017
Science Translational Medicine
NIH study of Ebola patient traces disease progression and recovery
Analysis of daily gene activation in a patient with severe Ebola virus disease cared for at NIH in 2015 found changes in antiviral and immune response genes that pinpointed key transition points in the response to infection. The changes included a marked decline in antiviral responses that correlated with clearance of virus from white blood cells. NIAID researchers led the study.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Anne O. Oplinger
aoplinger@niaid.nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 12-Apr-2017
Emerging Infectious Diseases
Why treating animals may be important in fighting resurgent tropical disease
As the World Health Organization steps up its efforts to eradicate a once-rampant tropical disease, a University of Washington study suggests that monitoring, and potentially treating, the monkeys that co-exist with humans in affected parts of the world may be part of the global strategy.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Center for Research Resources, Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency

Contact: Kim Eckart
keckart@uw.edu
206-616-5847
University of Washington

Public Release: 12-Apr-2017
Science Translational Medicine
Tackling Ebola, from supportive care to vaccines in clinical development
A new study reports the first detailed description of the day-by-day immune responses observed during the course of a patient's progression through, and recovery from, Ebola virus disease (EVD). During the EVD outbreak that struck West Africa from 2013 to 2015, more than 28,000 infections were reported, with 11,310 confirmed fatalities.

Contact: Jeffery K. Taubenberger
taubenbergerj@niaid.nih.gov
301-761-6453
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 12-Apr-2017
Nature
A big-picture look at the world's worst Ebola epidemic
An international effort to analyze the entire database of Ebola virus genomes from the 2013-2016 West African epidemic reveals insights into factors that sped or slowed the rampage and calls for using real-time sequencing and data-sharing to contain future viral disease outbreaks.
European Commission, National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, Wellcome Trust, Clinton Health Access Initiative, and others

Contact: Claire Hudson
crhudson@fredhutch.org
206-667-7365
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center

Public Release: 12-Apr-2017
European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
Exercise associated with improved heart attack survival
Exercise is associated with improved survival after a heart attack, according to research published today in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology. The chances of survival increased as the amount of exercise rose.

Contact: ESC Press Office
press@escardio.org
European Society of Cardiology

Public Release: 11-Apr-2017
MDI Biological Laboratory to provide incubator space to Monoclonals Inc.
The MDI Biological Laboratory has announced that it will provide laboratory incubator space to Monoclonals Inc., a biomedical startup that will relocate to Maine from West Lawn, Pennsylvania, in May. Monoclonals Inc. makes novel monoclonal antibodies for use in the diagnosis of viral diseases. Monoclonal antibodies enable the development of rapid test kits that allow physicians to quickly diagnose these diseases. Such diagnostic tools are extremely important in the treatment of infectious diseases.

Contact: Stefanie Matteson
smatteso@mdibl.org
207-288-9880
Mount Desert Island Biological Laboratory

Public Release: 11-Apr-2017
Water Environment Research
CDC/WHO Ebola guidelines could put sewer workers at risk
Research from Drexel University and the University of Pittsburgh suggests that guidelines for safe disposal of liquid waste from patients being treated for the Ebola virus might not go far enough to protect water treatment workers from being exposed.

Contact: Britt Faulstick
bef29@drexel.edu
215-895-2617
Drexel University

Public Release: 11-Apr-2017
BMJ
Higher tobacco taxes needed to reduce smoking rates in South Asia, new analysis says
Higher taxes on tobacco could reduce consumption in South Asia by at least one-third and avoid 35-45 million premature deaths, concludes an analysis published today in The British Medical Journal.

Contact: Leslie Shepherd
ShepherdL@smh.ca
416-864-6094
St. Michael's Hospital

Public Release: 10-Apr-2017
DesignMedix's malaria drug to enter clinical trials with support from NIH
DesignMedix Inc., a drug development company targeting drug resistant infectious diseases, has entered into an agreement with the National Institutes of Health that will pave the way for first-in-human clinical trials of DesignMedix's malaria drug DM1157.

Contact: Sandra Shotwell
shotwell@designmedix.com
503-348-0855
Portland State University

Public Release: 10-Apr-2017
Nature Medicine
The first live-attenuated vaccine candidate completely protects against Zika infection
The first live-attenuated Zika vaccine still in the development stage completely protected mice against the virus after a single vaccination dose, according to new research from the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston and Instituto Evandro Chagas at the Ministry of Health in Brazil. The findings are currently available in Nature Medicine.

Contact: Donna Ramirez
donna.ramirez@utmb.edu
409-772-8791
University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston

Public Release: 10-Apr-2017
Nature Communications
Researchers gain insight into protein critical to Zika virus reproduction
Berkeley Lab researchers collaborated with colleagues from the University of Indiana and Texas A&M University to solve the atomic structure of a Zika virus protein that is key to viral reproduction. The X-ray studies were conducted at the Advanced Light Source in the Berkeley Center for Structural Biology.
National Institutes of Health, Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Contact: Jon Weiner
jrweiner@lbl.gov
510-486-4014
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 10-Apr-2017
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Vaccines save lives, but maintaining widespread coverage is essential
Emory Vaccine Center leaders emphasize vaccines' life-saving and economic benefits along with importance of community confidence in vaccination.

Contact: Holly Korschun
hkorsch@emory.edu
404-727-3990
Emory Health Sciences

Public Release: 10-Apr-2017
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
El Nino shifts geographic distribution of cholera cases in Africa
Cholera cases in East Africa increase by roughly 50,000 during El Niño, the cyclical weather occurrence that profoundly changes global weather patterns, new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health research suggests.
Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, National Science Foundation

Contact: Stephanie Desmon
sdesmon1@jhu.edu
410-955-7619
Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health

Public Release: 10-Apr-2017
American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
Mysterious outbreak of disfiguring tropical disease in western Uganda linked to decades of walking barefoot in volcanic soils
A puzzling surge in western Uganda patients diagnosed with a painful, disfiguring skin condition known as elephantiasis was caused not by the parasitic worms typically associated with the affliction, but by long-term exposure to irritating soil minerals absorbed while walking barefoot, according to a new study published today in the American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

Contact: Bridget DeSimone
bdesimone@burness.com
301-280-5735
Burness

Public Release: 9-Apr-2017
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Programmed proteins might help prevent malaria
A new approach to stabilizing protein structures could be key to an efficient vaccine.

Contact: Gizel Maimon
gizel.maimon@weizmann.ac.il
972-893-43856
Weizmann Institute of Science

Public Release: 8-Apr-2017
EuroPrevent 2017
Grey hair linked with increased heart disease risk in men
Grey hair has been linked with an increased risk of heart disease in men, in research presented today at EuroPrevent 2017.

Contact: ESC Press Office
press@escardio.org
European Society of Cardiology

Public Release: 8-Apr-2017
EuroPrevent 2017
Obese Spanish workers take more sick leave
Obese Spanish workers take more sick leave than their healthy weight colleagues, according to research in more than 174,000 employees presented today at EuroPrevent 2017.
Carlos III Health Institute, Spain, and the European Regional Development Fund

Contact: ESC Press Office
press@escardio.org
European Society of Cardiology

Public Release: 7-Apr-2017
Grant to support research aimed at benefitting patients with IBD
Inflammatory bowel disease is a chronic inflammatory disease of the intestine that includes Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. A protective protein that plays a key role in IBD is TCPTP. Declan McCole, associate professor of biomedical sciences in the School of Medicine at the University of California, Riverside, has received a two-year grant of $150,000 from Pfizer Inc. to explore a therapeutic target for correcting intestinal barrier defects in IBD patients who have TCPTP mutations.
Pfizer Inc.

Contact: Iqbal Pittalwala
iqbal@ucr.edu
951-827-6050
University of California - Riverside

Public Release: 7-Apr-2017
EuroPrevent 2017
Big women have nearly threefold greater risk of atrial fibrillation
Big women have a nearly threefold greater risk of atrial fibrillation than small women, according to research presented today at EuroPrevent 2017. The study included 1.5 million women who were followed-up for more than 30 years.
Swedish Government, Swedish Heart and Lung Foundation, and others

Contact: ESC Press Office
press@escardio.org
European Society of Cardiology

Public Release: 6-Apr-2017
Ebola: New trial launched in west Africa to evaluate three vaccination strategies
The French National Institute of Health and Medical Research (Inserm), the US National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine (LSHTM), in collaboration with health authorities in Guinea and Liberia, are launching a large clinical trial of candidate Ebola vaccines under the aegis of the PREVAC international consortium (Partnership for Research on Ebola VACcination).
The French National Institute of Health, Medical Research, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: NIAID Office of Communications
niaidnews@niaid.nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 6-Apr-2017
Molecular Cell
Rutgers researchers determine structure of tuberculosis drug target
Rutgers University scientists have determined the three-dimensional structure of the target of the first-line anti-tuberculosis drug rifampin. They have also discovered a new class of potential anti-tuberculosis drugs that kill rifampin-resistant and multi-drug-resistant tuberculosis bacteria. Tuberculosis (TB) bacteria infect a third of the world's population and the disease kills 1.8 million people annually.
NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences, NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Global Alliance for TB Drug Development

Contact: Todd B. Bates
tbates@ucm.rutgers.edu
848-932-0550
Rutgers University

Public Release: 5-Apr-2017
Science Translational Medicine
Researchers develop Marburg virus treatment effective five days after infection
An antibody treatment successfully protected nonhuman primates against the deadly Marburg and Ravn viruses even when given five days after becoming infected, according to the latest findings of a collaborative team from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, Mapp Biopharmaceutical Inc., and Vanderbilt University.

Contact: Donna Ramirez
donna.ramirez@utmb.edu
409-772-8791
University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston

Public Release: 5-Apr-2017
Science Translational Medicine
Monoclonal antibody cures Marburg infection in monkeys
Scientists funded by the National Institutes of Health have found that an experimental treatment cured 100 percent of guinea pigs and rhesus monkeys in late stages of infection with lethal levels of Marburg and Ravn viruses, relatives of the Ebola virus. Although the Marburg and Ravn viruses are less familiar than Ebola virus, both can resemble Ebola in symptoms and outcomes in people, and both lack preventive and therapeutic countermeasures.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Ken Pekoc
kpekoc@niaid.nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Showing releases 26-50 out of 1340.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 > >>