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Disease in the Developing World

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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 351-375 out of 1351.

<< < 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 > >>

Public Release: 28-Aug-2016
ESC Congress 2016
Nebivolol prevents anthracycline-induced cardiotoxicity
Nebivolol prevents anthracycline-induced cardiotoxicity, according to research presented at ESC Congress 2016 today by Professor Mirela Cleopatra Tomescu, a cardiologist at Victor Babes University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Timisoara, Romania.

Contact: ESC Press Office
press@escardio.org
European Society of Cardiology

Public Release: 28-Aug-2016
ESC Congress 2016
Increased risk of death for heart failure patients with each NHS hospital admission
Heart failure patients have a 2 percent increased risk of dying with each admission to NHS hospitals, according to research presented at ESC Congress 2016 today. The 15-year study in more than 450,000 patients from the ACALM Study Unit, Birmingham, UK, included 13,416 patients with heart failure.

Contact: ESC Press Office
press@escardio.org
European Society of Cardiology

Public Release: 28-Aug-2016
ESC Congress 2016
Heart failure in the elderly set to triple by 2060
Heart failure in the elderly is set to triple by 2060, according to new data from the Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility (AGES) -- Reykjavík study presented at ESC Congress 2016 today.

Contact: ESC Press Office
press@escardio.org
European Society of Cardiology

Public Release: 27-Aug-2016
ESC Congress 2016
European Heart Journal
ESC launches novel paper on tackling cardiac toxicity of anticancer therapies
The European Society of Cardiology has launched a novel position paper, under the auspices of its Committee for Practice Guidelines, on tackling the cardiac toxicity of anticancer therapies. The cardio-oncology paper is published online today in European Heart Journal and on the ESC website.

Contact: ESC Press Office
press@escardio.org
European Society of Cardiology

Public Release: 27-Aug-2016
ESC Congress 2016
European Heart Journal
ESC/EAS guidelines for the management of dyslipidaemias launched today
European Society of Cardiology and European Atherosclerosis Society uidelines for the management of dyslipidaemias are published online today in European Heart Journal and on the ESC website.

Contact: ESC Press Office
press@escardio.org
European Society of Cardiology

Public Release: 27-Aug-2016
ESC Congress 2016
European Journal of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery
ESC and EACTS launch first collaborative atrial fibrillation guidelines
The first European Society of Cardiology Guidelines on Atrial Fibrillation developed in collaboration with the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery are published online today in European Heart Journal and the European Journal of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery, and on the ESC website.

Contact: ESC Press Office
press@escardio.org
European Society of Cardiology

Public Release: 27-Aug-2016
ESC Congress 2016
Alcohol-related hospitalization associated with doubled stroke risk in atrial fibrillation
Alcohol-related hospitalization is associated with a doubled risk of ischemic stroke risk in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation, according to a study presented at ESC Congress 2016 today by Dr. Faris Al-Khalili, cardiologist, Karolinska Institutet, Danderyd Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. The observational study was conducted in more than 25,000 non-valvular atrial fibrillation patients at low risk of stroke.

Contact: ESC Press Office
press@escardio.org
European Society of Cardiology

Public Release: 27-Aug-2016
ESC Congress 2016
Low socioeconomic status associated with higher risk of second heart attack or stroke
Low socioeconomic status is associated with a higher risk of a second heart attack or stroke, according to research presented at ESC Congress 2016 today. The study in nearly 30,000 patients with a prior heart attack found that the risk of a second event was 36 percent lower for those in the highest income quintile compared to the lowest and increased by 14 percent in divorced compared to married patients.

Contact: ESC Press Office
press@escardio.org
European Society of Cardiology

Public Release: 27-Aug-2016
ESC Congress 2016
20 cent school intervention stops unhealthy weight gain in children
A school intervention costing less than 20 cents per child has stopped unhealthy weight gain. The randomized study is presented at ESC Congress 2016 today by Daniela Schneid Schuh, a nutritionist at the Institute of Cardiology of Rio Grande do Sul in Porto Alegre, Brazil.

Contact: ESC Press Office
press@escardio.org
European Society of Cardiology

Public Release: 27-Aug-2016
ESC Congress 2016
Moderate physical activity linked with 50 percent reduction in cardiovascular death in over-65s
Moderate physical activity is associated with a greater than 50 percent reduction in cardiovascular death in over-65s, according to research presented at ESC Congress 2016 today. The 12-year study in nearly 2,500 adults aged 65 to 74 years found that moderate physical activity reduced the risk of an acute cardiovascular event by more than 30 percent. High levels of physical activity led to greater risk reductions.

Contact: ESC Press Office
press@escardio.org
European Society of Cardiology

Public Release: 25-Aug-2016
Current Opinions in Virology
In sub-Saharan Africa, cancer can be an infectious disease
University of Colorado Cancer Center researcher shows that mothers who contract malaria during pregnancy may have children with increased risk of Burkitt's lymphoma.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Garth Sundem
garth.sundem@ucdenver.edu
University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus

Public Release: 25-Aug-2016
Science
Solving a 48-year-old mystery: Scientists grow noroviruses in human intestinal cell cultures
For the first time, scientists have grown human noroviruses, the leading viral cause of acute diarrhea worldwide, in human intestinal cell cultures in the lab.

Contact: Graciela Gutierrez
ggutierr@bcm.edu
713-798-4710
Baylor College of Medicine

Public Release: 25-Aug-2016
Cell Host & Microbe
Newly discovered 'multicomponent' virus can infect animals
Scientists have identified a new 'multicomponent' virus --one containing different segments of genetic material in separate particles -- that can infect animals, according to research published today in the journal Cell Host & Microbe. This new pathogen, Guaico Culex virus, (GCXV), was isolated from several species of mosquitoes in Central and South America. GCXV does not appear to infect mammals; however, the team also isolated a related virus, Jingmen tick virus, from a nonhuman primate.
Defense Threat Reduction Agency, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Caree Vander Linden
teresa.l.vanderlinden.civ@mail.mil
301-619-2285
US Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 25-Aug-2016
Cell
Zika virus may persist in the vagina days after infection
The Zika virus reproduces in the vaginal tissue of pregnant mice several days after infection, according to a study by Yale researchers. From the genitals, the virus spreads and infects the fetal brain, impairing fetal development. The findings suggest that the Zika virus may replicate more robustly in the female reproductive tract than at other sites of infection, with potentially dire consequences for reproduction, said the researchers.
Howard Hughes Medical Institute, and National Institutes of Health

Contact: Ziba Kashef
ziba.kashef@yale.edu
203-436-9317
Yale University

Public Release: 24-Aug-2016
Infection and Immunity
Key substance for treatment of visceral leishmaniasis identified
A Brazilian study conducted at the University of São Paulo's Ribeirão Preto Medical School (FMRP-USP) shows that stimulating the production of interleukin-17A (IL-17A), one of the cytokines released by cells of the immune system, can be an effective strategy for the treatment of visceral leishmaniasis, considered one of the six most important parasitic diseases affecting humans.
São Paulo Research Foundation

Contact: Samuel Antenor
samuel@fapesp.br
55-113-838-4381
Fundação de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo

Public Release: 24-Aug-2016
Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry Letters
New small molecule compounds could treat Ebola virus infection
Scientists have found Ebola's Achilles' heel: a new kind of chemical compound can block the protein Ebola uses to break out of cells and infect new cells. The compounds, revealed in a new paper in Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry Letters, could potentially be used to treat the disease after infection.

Contact: Virus spread can be blocked by attacking Ebola's Achilles' h
a.moreira@elsevier.com
31-204-852-770
Elsevier

Public Release: 24-Aug-2016
Lancet Global Health
Conflicts subverting improved health conditions in Eastern Mediterranean Region
Improved health conditions and life expectancy over the past 20 years in the Eastern Mediterranean Region are being subverted by wars and civil unrest, according to a new scientific study.
Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation

Contact: Kayla Albrecht
albrek7@uw.edu
206-897-3792
Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation

Public Release: 23-Aug-2016
Radiology
Study suggests that brain damages caused by Zika virus congenital infection go beyond microcephaly
A recent study published by Brazilian researchers indicates brain malformations induced by Zika virus congenital infection. More than microcephaly, the research indicates other neurological changes such as reduction in brain volume, cortical development abnormalities and ventriculomegaly.

Contact: Stella Correa
stella.correa@idor.org
55-219-713-77944
D'Or Institute for Research and Education

Public Release: 23-Aug-2016
New blood spot test used internationally in fight against HIV
Researchers at the Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences at CU Anschutz have developed a technique that estimates an HIV-negative patient's adherence to drugs prescribed to prevent HIV transmission during sex.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Nathan Gill
Nathan.gill@ucdenver.edu
303-319-5073
University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus

Public Release: 23-Aug-2016
PLOS Medicine
Shortfalls in laboratory services may limit attainment of worldwide targets for HIV
Vincent Habiyambere of the World Health Organization and colleagues find that insufficient capacity to perform laboratory tests used in monitoring HIV infection, and underutilization of existing testing capacity, are limiting the ability to meet the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV and AIDS 90-90-90 targets, in a study appearing in PLOS Medicine.

Contact: PLOS Medicine
medicinepress@plos.org
PLOS

Public Release: 22-Aug-2016
Nature Microbiology
UTMB researchers protect against lethal Ebola Sudan infection four days after infection
Researchers at The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, in collaboration with Arbutus Biopharma Corporation, have protected nonhuman primates against Ebola Sudan four days following exposure to the virus.

Contact: Donna Ramirez
donna.ramirez@utmb.edu
409-772-8791
University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston

Public Release: 22-Aug-2016
Water Resources Research
Urban pumping raises arsenic risk in Southeast Asia
Large-scale groundwater pumping is opening doors for dangerously high levels of arsenic to enter some of Southeast Asia's aquifers, with water now seeping in through riverbeds with arsenic concentrations more than 100 times the limits of safety, according to a new study from scientists at Columbia University's Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, MIT, and Hanoi University of Science.

Contact: Kevin Krajick
kkrajick@ei.columbia.edu
212-854-9729
The Earth Institute at Columbia University

Public Release: 22-Aug-2016
Nature Genetics
New types of African Salmonella associated with lethal infection
The first global-scale genetic study of Salmonella Enteritidis bacteria, which is a major cause of blood poisoning and death in Africa and food poisoning in the Western World, has discovered that there are in fact three separate types. Scientists at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine and University of Liverpool found two novel African types, which looked the same, but were genetically different from the Western type.
Wellcome Trust, Institut Pasteur, Institut de Veille Sanitaire, Investissement d'Avenir, Third Framework Agreement between the Belgian Directorate General of Development Cooperation and the Institute of Tropical Medicine, and others

Contact: Samantha Wynne
press.office@sanger.ac.uk
122-349-2368
Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute

Public Release: 22-Aug-2016
The Lancet Global Health
Study validates new tool for diagnosing dehydration in children
A simple new method for assessing dehydration from diarrhea, which kills hundreds of thousands of children each year worldwide, has proven accurate and reliable.
NIH/Fogarty International Center

Contact: David Orenstein
david_orenstein@brown.edu
401-863-1862
Brown University

Public Release: 22-Aug-2016
American Chemical Society 252nd National Meeting & Exposition
Simple new test could improve diagnosis of tuberculosis in developing nations
The current test used in developing nations to diagnose tuberculosis is error-prone, complicated and slow. Furthermore, patients in these resource-limited areas can't easily travel back to a clinic at a later date to get their results. Chemists have now developed a simpler, faster and more accurate test. Trials of the new test began in Africa in June. The researchers will present their work at the 252nd National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Showing releases 351-375 out of 1351.

<< < 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 > >>