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Disease in the Developing World

News Releases

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 51-75 out of 1336.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 > >>

Public Release: 26-May-2017
EuroCMR
Diesel pollution linked to heart damage
Diesel pollution is linked with heart damage, according to research presented today at EuroCMR 2017.
British Heart Foundation, Wellcome Trust

Contact: ESC Press Office
press@escardio.org
European Society of Cardiology

Public Release: 26-May-2017
EuroCMR
Researchers develop faster and cheaper cardiac imaging test for developing countries
Researchers in the UK and Peru have developed a faster and cheaper cardiac imaging test that can be used in developing countries, according to the results of the INCA-Peru study presented today at EuroCMR 2017. The scan is three times faster, less than one-fifth of the cost, and changed clinical management in 33 percent of patients.
UK Foreign & Commonwealth Office

Contact: ESC Press Office
press@escardio.org
European Society of Cardiology

Public Release: 26-May-2017
PLOS Genetics
Latin-Americans with different Native-American ancestry show different health risks
Latin-Americans originate from a mix of people with Native-American, European and African ancestry. A new study finds that different types of original Native-American ancestry can be associated to different causes of death. Justo Lorenzo Bermejo and Felix Boekstegers from Heidelberg University in Germany, and their Chilean colleagues report these findings in a new study published May 26, 2017, in PLOS Genetics.

Contact: Justo Lorenzo Bermejo
lorenzo@imbi.uni-heidelberg.de
PLOS

Public Release: 25-May-2017
Current Diabetes Reviews
Mechanisms of neuronal cell death in AGE-exposed retinas -- research and literature review
Gradual accumulation of glycated proteins, lipids and nucleic acid is a common process in normal aging, however rise in blood glucose levels, an increase of oxidative stress over time triggering further protein modification and resulting in impairment of defense mechanisms. AGEs accumulation in various tissues under diabetic conditions plays an important role in the development of neuronal and vascular complications such as diabetic retinopathy.

Contact: Faizan ul Haq
faizan@benthamscience.org
Bentham Science Publishers

Public Release: 25-May-2017
PLOS Pathogens
Zika infections could be factor in more pregnancies
Zika virus infection passes efficiently from a pregnant monkey to its fetus, spreading inflammatory damage throughout the tissues that support the fetus and the fetus's developing nervous system, and suggesting a wider threat in human pregnancies than generally appreciated, University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers have found.

Contact: Ted Golos
golos@primate.wisc.edu
608-263-3567
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Public Release: 25-May-2017
EuroCMR
Do men have worse chemotherapy-induced cardiomyopathy than women?
Men seem to have worse chemotherapy-induced cardiomyopathy than women despite receiving similar cancer treatments, according to research presented today at EuroCMR 2017.
Bristol, National Institute of Health Research, Cardiovascular Biomedical Research Unit

Contact: ESC Press Office
press@escardio.org
European Society of Cardiology

Public Release: 24-May-2017
MSU doctor to help eradicate malaria in Malawi with $8.5 million grant
Terrie Taylor, Michigan State University Distinguished Professor of internal medicine and an osteopathic physician, will use a 7-year, $8.5 million federal grant to study why previous malaria prevention and eradication methods in Malawi Africa have been unsuccessful and how progress can be made.
NIH.National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Jessi Adler
jessi.adler@cabs.msu.edu
517-355-6469
Michigan State University

Public Release: 24-May-2017
Nature
Zika virus spread undetected for many months, NIH-supported study finds
Genetic analysis of samples collected as the Zika virus spread throughout the Americas after its introduction show that the virus circulated undetected for up to a year in some regions before it came to the attention of public health authorities. Genetic sequencing has also enabled scientists to recreate the epidemiological and evolutionary paths the virus took as it spread and split into distinct subtypes. The research, published in Nature, was supported in part by NIAID.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Elizabeth Deatrick
elizabeth.deatrick@nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 24-May-2017
Malaria Journal
Large market share for non-quality-assured malaria medicines in Africa
A new study of malaria medicine quality in eight sub-Saharan African countries has found a large and potentially growing market for non-quality-assured (QA) malaria treatments -- medicines not pre-approved by global health organizations -- as much as 20 percent of the private-sector market in Kenya, and 42 percent in the Democratic Republic of Congo.
Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, UNITAID, UK Department for International Development

Contact: Barney McManigal
barney.mcmanigal@wwarn.org
44-186-561-2963
Infectious Diseases Data Observatory

Public Release: 24-May-2017
Nature
FGCU virologists publish study that finds Zika invaded Florida multiple times in 2016
A new study by an international group of scientists reveals that the Zika virus outbreak in Florida wasn't a single virus introduction but rather at least four separate introductions from the Caribbean and Central America that each led to local chains of transmission.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Sharon Isern, Ph.D.
sisern@fgcu.edu
239-590-7438
Florida Gulf Coast University

Public Release: 23-May-2017
PLOS Pathogens
Scientists gain better understanding of how Ebola disables people's immune defenses
University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston scientists have unlocked mysteries of how the Ebola virus hampers the body's natural defenses to speed the rate of infection and its accompanying lethal disease, according to a new report in PLOS Pathogens. The study was conducted in collaboration with the University of Washington and The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.

Contact: Donna Ramirez
donna.ramirez@utmb.edu
409-772-8791
University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston

Public Release: 22-May-2017
AIMS Environmental Science
Human-induced deforestation is causing an increase in malaria cases
A new study of 67 less-developed, malaria-endemic nations led by Lehigh University sociologist Dr. Kelly Austin, finds a link between deforestation and increasing malaria rates across developing nations.

Contact: Lauren Stralo
lkw214@lehigh.edu
610-758-3969
Lehigh University

Public Release: 22-May-2017
NPJ Vaccines
Modified experimental vaccine protects monkeys from deadly malaria
Researchers from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of NIH, modified an experimental malaria vaccine and showed that it completely protected four of eight monkeys that received it against challenge with the virulent Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasite. In three of the remaining four monkeys, the vaccine delayed when parasites first appeared in the blood by more than 25 days.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: NIAID Office of Communications
niaidnews@niaid.nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 21-May-2017
ATS 2017 International Conference
Directly observed therapy for multidrug-resistant TB decreases mortality
Directly observed therapy (DOT) for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR TB) was associated with a 77 percent decrease in mortality in the United States, compared to self-administered therapy from 1993 to 2013, according to new research presented at the ATS 2017 International Conference.

Contact: Dacia Morris
dmorris@thoracic.org
212-315-8620
American Thoracic Society

Public Release: 20-May-2017
EuroHeartCare 2017
Tablet helps heart failure patients manage their disease including drug dosages
A novel tablet is helping heart failure patients to manage their disease including drug dosages, according to research presented today at EuroHeartCare 2017.

Contact: ESC Press Office
press@escardio.org
European Society of Cardiology

Public Release: 20-May-2017
EuroHeartCare 2017
Heart failure and stroke identified as lethal combination
Heart failure and stroke has been identified as a lethal combination in research presented today at EuroHeartCare 2017. Heart failure patients with previous stroke had greater risks of depression, hospitalization and death than those without a history of stroke.
Netherlands Heart Foundation, Biosite France SAS, Jouy-en-Josas, France, Roche Diagnostics Nederland BV, Venlo, The Netherlands

Contact: ESC Press Office
press@escardio.org
European Society of Cardiology

Public Release: 19-May-2017
EuroHeartCare 2017
Nearly one-quarter of patients say mechanical heart valve disturbs sleep
Nearly one-quarter of patients with a mechanical heart valve say it disturbs their sleep, according to research presented today at EuroHeartCare 2017.
Western Norway Health Authority, The Norwegian Nursing Association

Contact: ESC Press Office
press@escardio.org
European Society of Cardiology

Public Release: 18-May-2017
Cell
Antibodies from Ebola survivor protect mice and ferrets against related viruses
Researchers funded in part by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of NIH, have studied the blood of an Ebola survivor, searching for human antibodies that might effectively treat people infected with Ebola virus and those infected with related viruses. The researchers have identified two such antibodies that hold promise as Ebola treatments.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Elizabeth Deatrick
elizabeth.deatrick@nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 18-May-2017
Science
Natural resistance to malaria linked to variation in human red blood cell receptors
Researchers have discovered that protection from the most severe form of malaria is linked with natural variation in human red blood cell genes. A study from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics and their collaborators has identified a genetic rearrangement of red blood cell glycophorin receptors that confers a 40 percent reduced risk from severe malaria. Published in Science, this opens a new avenue of research for malarial therapeutics.
Wellcome Trust, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the Medical Research Council

Contact: Samantha Wynne
press.office@sanger.ac.uk
122-349-2368
Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute

Public Release: 18-May-2017
PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases
Deaths from Chagas disease under-reported
Chagas disease, affecting millions of people in Central and South America, is classified as one of the 17 most important neglected diseases by the World Health Organization. Now, researchers have found that even the non-symptomatic stage of Chagas infection, which can last for many years, more than doubles a person's risk of death. The new study, published in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases, also concludes that deaths from Chagas have likely been under-reported in the past.

Contact: Ligia Capuani
lcapuani@gmail.com
PLOS

Public Release: 17-May-2017
Green and Sustainable Chemistry Conference
Winners announced for the Elsevier Foundation Green and Sustainable Chemistry Challenge
Chemistry solutions that tap native plants, such as cashew nuts, to tackle mosquito borne diseases through environmentally friendly insecticides and a focus on eco-remediation of land devastated by crude oil spills in Nigeria, won the Elsevier Foundation Green and Sustainable Chemistry Challenge.

Contact: Elisa Nelissen
e.nelissen@elsevier.com
31-204-852-492
Elsevier

Public Release: 17-May-2017
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics
Ozone and haze pollution weakens land carbon uptake in China
A study led by Dr. YUE Xu from CAS Institute of Atmospheric Physics provides the first systematic assessment of the effects of ozone and aerosol haze pollution on terrestrial ecosystem health and land carbon assimilation in China, for the present day and two possible future scenarios.

Contact: Zheng Lin
jennylin@mail.iap.ac.cn
86-108-299-5053
Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 17-May-2017
mSphere
A step towards understanding Zika
Brisbane researchers have synthetically re-created Zika virus in the laboratory -- a breakthrough which will help to understand the virus and the fetal brain defects it causes. The collaborative research was led by University of Queensland School of Chemistry and Molecular Bioscience's Professor Alexander Khromykh and Professor Andreas Suhrbier from QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute.

Contact: Alexander Khromykh
a.khromykh@uq.edu.au
61-733-467-219
University of Queensland

Public Release: 17-May-2017
PLOS ONE
Costs for generic hepatitis C drugs available in India would be paid back in 5 to 10 years
Use of the generic versions of directly-acting antiviral drugs that are available in India to treat hepatitis C virus infection is not only cost effective but actually saves lifetime costs for treating infected patients in that country.

Contact: Mike Morrison
mdmorrison@partners.org
617-726-6425
Massachusetts General Hospital

Public Release: 16-May-2017
Genome Biology and Evolution
TB bacteria evolve at alarming rate
Scientists carried out a research aimed at identifying the genes and mutations in them that allow mycobacteria to thrive in people with altered immune status including HIV-positive patients. They developed a catalog of mutations in more than 300 virulence (disease causing) genes. Further analysis identified a set of three mutations which may enable mycobacteria to develop rapidly in an immunocompromised environment.
TBResist Consortium

Contact: Asya Shepunova
shepunova@phystech.edu
7-916-813-0267
Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology

Showing releases 51-75 out of 1336.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 > >>