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Disease in the Developing World

News Releases

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 776-800 out of 1311.

<< < 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 > >>

Public Release: 18-Aug-2015
American Chemical Society 250th National Meeting & Exposition
Paper-based test can quickly diagnose Ebola in remote areas (video)
When a fever strikes in a developing area, the immediate concern may be: Is it the common flu or something much worse? To facilitate diagnosis in remote, low-resource settings, researchers have developed a paper-based device that changes color, depending on whether the patient has Ebola, yellow fever or dengue. It takes minutes and does not need electricity. The team will describe their approach at the 250th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 13-Aug-2015
$7 million grant aids efforts to eliminate neglected tropical diseases
Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have received a $7 million grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation aimed at eliminating river blindness and elephantiasis, two neglected tropical diseases that annually sicken millions.
Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation

Contact: Judy Martin Finch
Washington University School of Medicine

Public Release: 13-Aug-2015
NIH-funded study establishes genomic data set on Lassa virus
An international team of researchers has developed the largest genomic data set in the world on Lassa virus (LASV). The genomic catalog contains nearly 200 viral genomes collected from patient and field samples from the major host of Lassa virus -- the multimammate rat. The study suggests that these four LASV strains originated from a common ancestral virus more than 1,000 years ago and spread across West Africa within the last several hundred years.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Linda Huynh
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 13-Aug-2015
International team discovers the ancient origins of deadly Lassa virus
Working as part of an international team in the United States and West Africa, a researcher at The Scripps Research Institute has published new findings showing the ancient roots of the deadly Lassa virus, a relative of Ebola virus, and how Lassa virus has changed over time.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, US Department of Health and Human Services, Packard Foundation Fellowship for Science and Engineering, Broad Institute SPARC Award, German Research Foundation, Carls

Contact: Madeline McCurry-Schmidt
Scripps Research Institute

Public Release: 13-Aug-2015
How the malaria parasite increases the risk of blood cancer
A link between malaria and Burkitt's lymphoma was first described more than 50 years ago, but how a parasitic infection could turn immune cells cancerous has remained a mystery. Now, in the Aug. 13 issue of Cell, researchers demonstrate in mice that B cell DNA becomes vulnerable to cancer-causing mutations during prolonged combat against the malaria-causing Plasmodium falciparum.
National Institutes of Health, Worldwide Cancer Research, Fondazione Ettore e Valeria Rossi

Contact: Joseph Caputo
Cell Press

Public Release: 12-Aug-2015
Journal of Women's Health
Diagnostic imaging can rule out coronary artery disease in patients with atypical chest pain
Non-invasive diagnostic imaging can rule out coronary artery disease (CAD) in about 50 percent of women with atypical chest pain who are at relatively low risk for CAD, while exposing them to only a modest dose of radiation.

Contact: Kathryn Ryan
Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News

Public Release: 12-Aug-2015
Best interest of the child: Improving health, well-being of low resource country orphans
Researchers from Regenstrief Institute, Indiana University, Brown University, University of Toronto, and Moi University in Eldoret, Kenya are building upon their landmark study of Kenyan orphans which found that those living in orphanages were healthier, both physically and mentally, than those living with extended family members. The new study investigates the causes of this disparity.
NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Contact: Cindy Fox Aisen
Indiana University

Public Release: 12-Aug-2015
ACS Central Science
Powering off TB: New electron transport gene is a potential drug target
The US Food and Drug Administration recently approved the first new drug to fight tuberculosis in more than 40 years, but treatment still takes six months, 200 pills and leaves 40 percent of patients uncured. Thus, new targets are needed. Today in ACS Central Science, researchers report they have identified one such target -- a gene that allows the disease to camp out in human immune cells, and is thus essential for the organism's proliferation.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 11-Aug-2015
Keystone Symposia announces new three-year, multi-million-dollar grant
Keystone Symposia has received a new three-year, $2.25 million grant from the Gates Foundation to fund LMIC meetings in its Global Health Series plus Travel Awards for LMIC investigators.
Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation

Contact: Yvonne Psaila
Keystone Symposia on Molecular & Cellular Biology

Public Release: 11-Aug-2015
Journal of Virology
Research advances potential for test and vaccine for genital and oral herpes
Findings from a pair of new studies could speed up the development of a universally accurate diagnostic test for human herpes simplex viruses, according to researchers at Johns Hopkins and Harvard universities and the National Institutes of Health. The work may also lead to the development of a vaccine that protects against the virus.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Marin Hedin
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 11-Aug-2015
Back-to-school vaccines not just for students
Back-to-school is an annual reminder to make sure children are fully vaccinated. But vaccination is a life-long health concern and the AOA urges adults to use the seasonal cue to ensure their own immunizations are up to date. The AOA resolved at its annual business meeting that DOs should treat patients' vaccination history as an integral part of their health record and urges DOs to take all reasonable steps to ensure patients are fully immunized.

Contact: Lauren Brush
American Osteopathic Association

Public Release: 10-Aug-2015
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Scientists identify a mechanism of epidemic bacterial disease
Through identification of increased toxin production by epidemic forms of group A streptococcus (the 'flesh-eating' bacterium), for the first time scientists are able to pinpoint the molecular events that contribute to large intercontinental epidemics of disease. The study was based on sequencing almost 5,000 group A streptococcus genomes collected over decades.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Gale Smith
Houston Methodist

Public Release: 6-Aug-2015
Single dose Ebola vaccine is safe and effective in monkeys against outbreak strain
NIH scientists report that a single dose of an experimental Ebola virus vaccine completely protects cynomolgus macaques against the current EBOV outbreak strain, EBOV-Makona, when given at least seven days before exposure, and partially protects them if given three days prior. The live-attenuated vaccine, VSV-EBOV, uses genetically engineered vesicular stomatitis virus to carry an EBOV gene that has safely induced protective immunity in macaques.
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Ken Pekoc
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 6-Aug-2015
Vaccine protects against Ebola when administered 7 days ahead
In the face of the recent Ebola outbreak, some good news emerges: a preclinical study testing the efficacy of the Ebola vaccine VSV-EBOV against the newly emerged West African Ebola strain shows complete protection when administered seven days before infection in nonhuman primates, and partial protection when administered three days before infection.

Contact: Natasha Pinol
American Association for the Advancement of Science

Public Release: 6-Aug-2015
PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases
When fat is the solution: Using adipose cells to attenuate chagasic cardiomyopathy
It could be a plot for a vampire story: In the middle of the night, blood-sucking creatures feed on peoples' faces and spread a deadly disease to the hearts of millions, who are then fated to endure a painful death.
Coordination for the Improvement of Higher Education Personnel, National Council for Scientific and Technological Development, Rio de Janeiro State Foundation for Research

Contact: Adriana Bastos Carvalho
Publicase Comunicação Científica

Public Release: 4-Aug-2015
Nature Communications
New weapon in the fight against malnutrition
UBC scientists have opened the doors to new research into malnutrition by creating an animal model that replicates the imbalance of gut bacteria associated with the difficult-to-treat disease.

Contact: Heather Amos
University of British Columbia

Public Release: 3-Aug-2015
Scientific Reports
New approach for making vaccines for deadly diseases
Researchers have devised an entirely new approach to vaccines -- creating immunity without vaccination. They demonstrated that animals injected with synthetic DNA engineered to encode a specific neutralizing antibody against the dengue virus were capable of producing the exact antibodies necessary to protect against disease, without the need for standard antigen-based vaccination. This approach, was rapid, protecting animals within a week of administration.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, and Inovio Pharmaceuticals

Contact: Karen Kreeger
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 3-Aug-2015
Nature Communications
Stress responder is a first responder in helping repair DNA damage and avoiding cancer
DNA damage increases the risk of cancer, and researchers have found that a protein, known to rally when cells get stressed, plays a critical, early step in its repair.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Toni Baker
Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University

Public Release: 3-Aug-2015
Pitt researchers to monitor resistance to HIV drugs in Africa
Infectious diseases researchers from the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine are leading a five-year, $5 million initiative to monitor drug resistance during the rollout of HIV prevention drugs in sub-Saharan Africa.
US Agency for International Development, US President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief

Contact: Allison Hydzik
University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences

Public Release: 3-Aug-2015
WSU researchers investigate effect of environmental epigenetics on disease and evolution
Washington State University researchers say environmental factors are having an underappreciated effect on the course of disease and evolution by prompting genetic mutations through epigenetics, a process by which genes are turned on and off independent of an organism's DNA sequence. Their assertion is a dramatic shift in how we might think of disease and evolution's underlying biology and 'changes how we think about where things come from,' said WSU biologist Michael Skinner.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Michael Skinner
Washington State University

Public Release: 31-Jul-2015
BMC Public Health
Tool helps public health agencies prioritize health risks
Public health agencies across the globe are challenged with preventing the spread of chronic diseases while dealing with limited funds and devastating budget cuts. Now, a researcher at the University of Missouri has applied the Public Health Index model, a tool he designed that has been adopted by the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services, to help the Brazilian government identify and prioritize health risks affecting its population.

Contact: Diamond Dixon
University of Missouri-Columbia

Public Release: 31-Jul-2015
Brown University to help Ghana build HIV, TB research capacity
With $1.45 million over five years from the Fogarty International Center of the National Institutes of Health, a pair of Brown University professors will work with colleagues in Ghana to build the research capacity needed to address the deadly co-epidemics of HIV and tuberculosis.
NIH/Fogarty International Center

Contact: David Orenstein
Brown University

Public Release: 30-Jul-2015
Safeguarding the greater good
Research teams from the Wyss Institute and University of California, San Diego -- the only two groups to have published work on RNA-guided CRISPR gene drives -- have proactively assembled an international group of 26 experts, including prominent genetic engineers and fruit fly geneticists, to unanimously recommend a series of preemptive measures to safeguard gene drive research.

Contact: Kat J. McAlpine
Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard

Public Release: 29-Jul-2015
Powerful patents: Navy outranks all government agencies in yearly report
Predicting the risk of pirate attacks on vital shipping lanes could soon be easier, thanks to a data system that's just one of 364 technologies patented by the US Navy in 2014.

Contact: Bob Freeman
Office of Naval Research

Public Release: 29-Jul-2015
Proof-of-concept study shows successful transport of blood samples with small drones
In a proof-of-concept study at Johns Hopkins, researchers have shown that results of common and routine blood tests are not affected by up to 40 minutes of travel via hobby-sized drones. The investigators say that's promising news for the millions of people cared for in rural and economically impoverished areas that lack passable roads in developing nations, because drones can give health care workers quick access to lab tests needed for diagnoses and treatments.

Contact: Shawna Williams
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Showing releases 776-800 out of 1311.

<< < 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 > >>