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Nanotechnology

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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1301-1325 out of 2012.

<< < 48 | 49 | 50 | 51 | 52 | 53 | 54 | 55 | 56 | 57 > >>

Public Release: 15-Jul-2016
Nanoscale Horizons
Easier, faster, cheaper: A full-filling approach to making nanotubes of consistent quality
To prevent filling of the cores of single-wall carbon nanotubes with water or other detrimental substances, researchers advise intentionally prefilling them with a desired chemical of known properties. Taking this step before separating and dispersing the materials, yields a consistently uniform collection of nanotubes. In quantity and quality, the results are superior to water-filled nanotubes, especially for optical applications such as sensors and photodetectors.

Contact: Mark Bello
mark.bello@nist.gov
301-975-3776
National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)

Public Release: 15-Jul-2016
Scientific Reports
Scientists move 1 step closer to creating an invisibility cloak
Scientists at Queen Mary University of London have made an object disappear by using a material with nano-size particles that can enhance specific properties on the object's surface.
Engineering Physical Sciences Research Council

Contact: Neha Okhandiar
n.okhandiar@qmul.ac.uk
Queen Mary University of London

Public Release: 13-Jul-2016
Chemical Communications
Researchers uncover new light harvesting potentials
Griffith University researchers have discovered significant new potentials for light harvesting through narrowing the bandgap of titania and graphene quantum dots.

Contact: Stephanie Bedo
s.bedo@griffith.edu.au
040-872-7734
Griffith University

Public Release: 13-Jul-2016
Scientific Reports
Crossing the barriers: Pharmacy researchers improving drug delivery
A number of drugs -- from insulin to cancer chemotherapy -- can be delivered only via injections, which are far more difficult for patients than taking a simple tablet or pill. It can also be more expensive, as this type of drug has to be prepared very carefully and sometimes can only be administered in a clinical setting.

Contact: Holly Shive
hshive@tamhsc.edu
979-436-0613
Texas A&M University

Public Release: 13-Jul-2016
3D Printing and Additive Manufacturing
New dissolvable metal support enables 3-D printing of complex metallic structures
Researchers have fabricated dissolvable carbon steel structures using 3-D printing technology that can provide temporary support for components of larger stainless steel structures made by additive manufacturing. The first-of-its-kind soluble metal support is subsequently removed via electrochemical etching in nitric acid with bubbling oxygen, as described in an article in 3-D Printing and Additive Manufacturing.

Contact: Kathryn Ryan
kryan@liebertpub.com
914-740-2100
Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News

Public Release: 13-Jul-2016
Remote-controlled implantable device delivers HIV prevention drug
A Houston Methodist research team received a nearly $4 million grant to test a transcutaneously refillable implant that administers pre-exposure prophylaxis drugs to subjects at risk of HIV-exposure.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Gale Smith
gsmith@houstonmethodist.org
281-627-0439
Houston Methodist

Public Release: 13-Jul-2016
Nature Chemistry
Tiny works of art with great potential
Unlike classical crystals, quasicrystals do not comprise periodic units, even though they do have a superordinate structure. The formation of the fascinating mosaics that they produce is barely understood. In the context of an international collaborative effort, researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have now presented a methodology that allows the production of two-dimensional quasicrystals from metal-organic networks, opening the door to the development of promising new materials.
European Research Council, Comunidad de Madrid, Ramón and Cajal Program, Hong Kong Research Grants Council, TUM-HKUST Sponsorship Scheme

Contact: Dr. Andreas Battenberg
battenberg@zv.tum.de
49-892-891-0510
Technical University of Munich (TUM)

Public Release: 13-Jul-2016
2016 Sino-US Symposium on Nanoscale Science and Technology
Springer Nature and Tsinghua University Press present the Third Nano Research Award
Peidong Yang has received the third Tsinghua University Press-Springer Nano Research Award. Peidong Yang is the S.K. and Angela Chan Distinguished Professor of Energy and Professor of Chemistry at the University of California, Berkeley, and a faculty scientist at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

Contact: Joan Robinson
joan.robinson@springer.com
49-622-148-78130
Springer

Public Release: 12-Jul-2016
Materials Horizons
Engineered 'sand' may help cool electronic devices
Baratunde Cola would like to put sand into your computer. Not beach sand, but silicon dioxide nanoparticles coated with a high dielectric constant polymer to inexpensively provide improved cooling for increasingly power-hungry electronic devices.
Air Force Research Laboratory, US Air Force

Contact: John Toon
jtoon@gatech.edu
404-894-6986
Georgia Institute of Technology

Public Release: 12-Jul-2016
Nature
DNA origami lights up a microscopic glowing Van Gogh
A technique that allows manmade DNA shapes to be placed wherever desired -- to within a margin of error of just 20 nanometers -- now removes a major hurdle for the large-scale integration of molecular devices on chips.
Army Research Office, Office of Naval Research, Air Force Office of Scientific Research, and National Science Foundation

Contact: Robert Perkins
rperkins@caltech.edu
626-658-1053
California Institute of Technology

Public Release: 11-Jul-2016
Scientists develop novel opsin and delivery platform for blind patients
Nanoscope Scientists have developed a highly photosensitive Virus carrying Multi-Characteristics Opsin that allows stimulation of retinal cells for restoring vision in patients with AMD and genetic retinal diseases with photo-degeneration. Since many of these diseases have geographic atrophies, it would be advantageous to accurately treat only the affected areas. NanoScope has been recently awarded multiple grants from the NIH-NEI to conduct preclinical evaluation of VMCO and to develop localized methods of gene delivery.
NIH/National Eye Institute

Contact: Sulagna Bhattacharya
ceo@nanoscopetech.com
626-244-5300
Nanoscope Technologies

Public Release: 11-Jul-2016
ACS Nano
Germs add ripples to make 'groovy' graphene
Graphene, a two-dimensional wonder-material composed of a single layer of carbon atoms linked in a hexagonal chicken-wire pattern, has attracted intense interest for its phenomenal ability to conduct electricity. Now University of Illinois at Chicago researchers have used rod-shaped bacteria -- precisely aligned in an electric field, then vacuum-shrunk under a graphene sheet -- to introduce nanoscale ripples in the material, causing it to conduct electrons differently in perpendicular directions.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Bill Burton
burton@uic.edu
312-996-2269
University of Illinois at Chicago

Public Release: 11-Jul-2016
Scientific Reports
Nanotech 'tattoo' can map emotions and monitor muscle activity
A new temporary 'electronic tattoo' developed by Tel Aviv University that can measure the activity of muscle and nerve cells researchers is poised to revolutionize medicine, rehabilitation, and even business and marketing research.

Contact: George Hunka
ghunka@aftau.org
212-742-9070
American Friends of Tel Aviv University

Public Release: 11-Jul-2016
Chemistry of Materials
Researchers develop faster, precise silica coating process for quantum dot nanorods
Materials researchers have fine-tuned a technique that enables them to apply precisely controlled silica coatings to quantum dot nanorods in a day -- up to 21 times faster than previous methods. In addition to saving time, the advance means the quantum dots are less likely to degrade, preserving their advantageous optical properties.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Matt Shipman
matt_shipman@ncsu.edu
919-515-6386
North Carolina State University

Public Release: 11-Jul-2016
Scientific Reports
Achieving a breakthrough in the formation of beam size controllable X-ray nanobeams
A research team in Japan has now succeeded in developing high precision X-ray deformable mirrors that can be configured as necessary. They are the first to have achieved the formation of three types of X-ray focused beams, which differ in focused spot size, without changing the experimental setup. These findings constitute a considerable step towards developing a multifunctional X-ray microscope, which will be able to perform a variety of microscopic analyses in one device.
Japan Science and Technology Agency

Contact: Saori Obayashi
saori_obayashi@mail.osaka-u.ac.jp
81-661-055-886
Osaka University

Public Release: 11-Jul-2016
Nature Nanotechnology
Physicists couple distant nuclear spins using a single electron
For the first time, researchers at the University of Basel in Switzerland have coupled the nuclear spins of distant atoms using just a single electron. Three research groups took part in this complex experiment, the results of which have now been published in the journal Nature Nanotechnology.
National Center of Competence in Research Quantum Science and Technology, Swiss National Science Foundation, Swiss Nanoscience Institute

Contact: Reto Caluori
reto.caluori@unibas.ch
41-612-672-495
University of Basel

Public Release: 11-Jul-2016
Nature Nanotechnology
Berkeley Lab scientists grow atomically thin transistors and circuits
In an advance that helps pave the way for next-generation electronics and computing technologies -- and possibly paper-thin gadgets -- scientists with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory developed a way to chemically assemble transistors and circuits that are only a few atoms thick.
Office of Naval Research and National Science Foundation

Contact: Jon Weiner
jrweiner@lbl.gov
510-486-4014
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 8-Jul-2016
Nature Materials
Setting the gold standard
A team of University of Florida researchers has figured out how gold can be used in crystals grown by light to create nanoparticles, a discovery that has major implications for industry and cancer treatment and could improve the function of pharmaceuticals, medical equipment and solar panels.
Air Force Office of Science Research, National Science Foundation

Contact: Wei David Wei
wwei@mail.ufl.edu
352-392-2050
University of Florida

Public Release: 8-Jul-2016
Nano Letters
Atomic bits despite zero-point energy?
Scientists at Jülich have found out that zero-point energy plays an important role in the stability of nanomagnets. These are of great technical interest for the magnetic storage of data, but so far have never been sufficiently stable. Researchers are now pointing the way to making it possible to produce nanomagnets with low zero-point energy and thus a higher degree of stability (Nanoletters).

Contact: Angela Wenzik
a.wenzik@fz-juelich.de
49-246-161-6048
Forschungszentrum Juelich

Public Release: 8-Jul-2016
Physicists discover family of tetraquarks
Physicists in the College of Arts and Sciences have made science history by confirming the existence of a rare four-quark particle and discovering evidence of three other 'exotic' siblings. Their findings are based on data from the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the world's biggest, most powerful particle accelerator, located at the CERN science laboratory in Geneva, Switzerland.

Contact: Rob Enslin
rmenslin@syr.edu
315-443-9038
Syracuse University

Public Release: 8-Jul-2016
Science Advances
Scientists simulate tiny bacteria-powered 'windfarm'
A team of scientists from Oxford University has shown how the natural movement of bacteria could be harnessed to assemble and power microscopic 'windfarms' -- or other man-made micromachines such as smartphone components.

Contact: Stuart Gillespie
stuart.gillespie@admin.ox.ac.uk
44-018-652-83877
University of Oxford

Public Release: 7-Jul-2016
New Mexico African-American Affairs office honors 2 from Sandia
Two Sandia National Laboratories employees have been named recipients of 2016 Outstanding Service Awards from the New Mexico Office of African-American Affairs. Research engineer Conrad James and Theresa A. Carson, a senior manager in Sandia's Supply Chain Management Center, were recognized for their strong commitment to improving the quality of life for African-Americans in the community. The 13th annual service awards recognize dedication to education, community development, health care advocacy and economic advancement for African-Americans.

Contact: Rebecca Brock
rabrock@sandia.gov
505-844-7772
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 7-Jul-2016
NJIT receives $1 million grant from Keck Foundation for pioneering research in biophysics and nanotechnology
New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT) has received a $1 million grant from the W.M. Keck Foundation for a three-year project titled 'Engineering New Materials Based on Topological Phonon Edge Modes.'

Contact: Tanya Klein
klein@njit.edu
973-596-3433
New Jersey Institute of Technology

Public Release: 7-Jul-2016
Nature Communications
Researchers harness DNA as the engine of super-efficient nanomachine
Researchers at McMaster University have established a way to harness DNA as the engine of a microscopic 'machine' they can turn on to detect trace amounts of substances that range from viruses and bacteria to cocaine and metals.

Contact: John Brennan
brennanj@mcmaster.ca
905-525-9140 x20706
McMaster University

Public Release: 6-Jul-2016
Nature Communications
Researchers improve performance of cathode material by controlling oxygen activity
An international team of researchers has demonstrated a new way to increase the robustness and energy storage capability of a particular class of 'lithium-rich' cathode materials -- by using a carbon dioxide-based gas mixture to create oxygen vacancies at the material's surface. Researchers said the treatment improved the energy density -- the amount of energy stored per unit mass -- of the cathode material by up to 30 to 40 percent.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Liezel Labios
llabios@ucsd.edu
858-246-1124
University of California - San Diego

Showing releases 1301-1325 out of 2012.

<< < 48 | 49 | 50 | 51 | 52 | 53 | 54 | 55 | 56 | 57 > >>