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Nanotechnology

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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1526-1550 out of 1846.

<< < 57 | 58 | 59 | 60 | 61 | 62 | 63 | 64 | 65 | 66 > >>

Public Release: 22-Apr-2015
Nano Letters
Phonons, arise!
The creation of devices to control phonons -- elusive atomic vibrations that transport heat energy in solids at speeds up to the speed of sound -- has taken a step forward when researchers successfully altered the thermal conductivity of a widely used commercial material, using only a simple nine-volt battery.
Sandia's Laboratory Directed Research and Development office, Air Force Office of Scientific Research, National Science Foundation

Contact: Neal Singer
nsinger@sandia.gov
505-845-7078
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Public Release: 22-Apr-2015
CWRU researcher awarded $500,000 NSF CAREER grant
A Case Western Reserve University researcher has won a $500,000 National Science Foundation grant to create tiny sensors capable of detecting insecticides in Lake Erie or determining subtypes of human cancers. The sensors are designed to detect multiple cancer markers or environmental hazards at the same time and with greater sensitivity than what's currently available. The results could be used for personalized medicine or to more quickly identify pollutants and begin subsequent clean-up efforts.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Kevin Mayhood
kevin.mayhood@case.edu
216-534-7183
Case Western Reserve University

Public Release: 22-Apr-2015
Nature Communications
Nature: Low-reflection wings make butterflies nearly invisible
The effect is known from the smart phone: Sun is reflected by the display and hardly anything can be seen. In contrast to this, the glasswing butterfly hardly reflects any light in spite of its transparent wings. As a result, it is difficult for predatory birds to track the butterfly during the flight. Researchers of KIT under the direction of Hendrik Hölscher found that irregular nanostructures on the surface of the butterfly wing cause the low reflection.

Contact: Monika Landgraf
presse@kit.edu
49-721-608-47414
Karlsruher Institut für Technologie (KIT)

Public Release: 22-Apr-2015
ACS Nano
Surface matters: Huge reduction of heat conduction observed in flat silicon channels
Combining state-of-the-art realistic atomistic modelling and experiments, the paper describes how thermal conductivity of ultrathin silicon membranes is controlled to large extent by the structure and the chemical composition of their surface. A detailed understanding of the connections of fabrication and processing to structural and thermal properties of low-dimensional nanostructures is essential to design materials and devices for phononics, nanoscale thermal management, and thermoelectric applications.

Contact: Clivia M. Sotomayor Torres
clivia.sotomayor@icn.cat
34-937-372-607
Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona

Public Release: 21-Apr-2015
Nano Letters
'Holey' graphene for energy storage
Engineers at the University of California, San Diego have discovered a method to increase the amount of electric charge that can be stored in graphene, a two-dimensional form of carbon. The research, published recently online in the journal Nano Letters, may provide a better understanding of how to improve the energy storage ability of capacitors for potential applications in cars, wind turbines, and solar power.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Liezel Labios
llabios@ucsd.edu
858-246-1124
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 20-Apr-2015
UT Arlington electrical engineer developing ultraviolet laser to detect weapons' agents
A University of Texas at Arlington electrical engineering researcher is using a federal grant to build a small laser for detection systems to do a more efficient job at spotting chemical and biological agents used for weapons.
Defense Advance Research Projects Agency

Contact: Herb Booth
hbooth@uta.edu
817-272-7075
University of Texas at Arlington

Public Release: 20-Apr-2015
Advanced Science
Advances in molecular electronics: Lights on -- molecule on
Scientists at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf and the University of Konstanz are working on storing and processing information on the level of single molecules to create the smallest possible components that will combine autonomously to form a circuit. As recently reported in the academic journal Advanced Science, the researchers can switch on the current flow through a single molecule for the first time with the help of light.

Contact: Christine Bohnet
c.bohnet@hzdr.de
49-351-260-2450
Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf

Public Release: 20-Apr-2015
VTT accelerates commercialization of foam forming technology
Foam forming technology offers companies major cost saving possibilities in paper and paperboard manufacturing. It also expands the use of natural fibers in the production of recyclable and lightweight products.

Contact: Erkki Hellén
erkki.hellen@vtt.fi
358-407-194-675
VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland

Public Release: 20-Apr-2015
VTT creates efficient method of producing metallic nanoparticles
VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland Ltd. has developed a new, cost-efficient method of producing various types of metallic nanoparticles.

Contact: Raimo Korhonen
raimo.korhonen@vtt.fi
358-407-030-052
VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland

Public Release: 16-Apr-2015
Scientific Reports
Engineer improves rechargeable batteries with MoS2 nano 'sandwich'
The key to better cell phones and other rechargeable electronics may be in tiny 'sandwiches' made of nanosheets, according to mechanical engineering research from Kansas State University.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Gurpreet Singh
gurpreet@k-state.edu
785-532-7085
Kansas State University

Public Release: 16-Apr-2015
Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI 2015)
Thumbnail track pad
Researchers at the MIT Media Lab are developing a new wearable device that turns the user's thumbnail into a miniature wireless track pad.

Contact: Abby Abazorius
abbya@mit.edu
617-253-2709
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 16-Apr-2015
Nano Letters
Major advance in artificial photosynthesis poses win/win for the environment
By combining biocompatible light-capturing nanowire arrays with select bacterial populations, a potentially game-changing new artificial photosynthesis system offers a win/win situation for the environment: solar-powered green chemistry using sequestered carbon dioxide.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 16-Apr-2015
Nanotechnology
Nanotubes with 2 walls have singular qualities
Double-walled carbon nanotubes have unique electronic properties that may someday be tuned for semiconducting applications or for strong, highly conductive nanotube fibers, according to researchers at Rice University.
DOE/Research Partnership to Secure Energy for America, Mexican Government's CONACyT Program and the State of Nuevo León

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University

Public Release: 16-Apr-2015
Advanced Materials
An electronic micropump to deliver treatments deep within the brain
For a condition such as epilepsy, it is essential to act at exactly the right time and place in the brain. For this reason, the team of researchers led by Christophe Bernard at Inserm Unit 1106, Institute of Systems Neuroscience, has developed an organic electronic micropump which, when combined with an anti-convulsant drug, enables localiZed inhibition of epileptic seizure in brain tissue in vitro. This research is published in the journal Advanced Materials.

Contact: Christophe Bernard
christophe.bernard@univ-amu.fr
INSERM (Institut national de la santé et de la recherche médicale)

Public Release: 15-Apr-2015
Advanced Materials
Cobalt film a clean-fuel find
A Rice University lab produces a thin-film catalyst for both hydrogen and oxygen generation. The material could replace expensive metals like platinum in water-electrolysis devices that produce hydrogen and oxygen for fuel cells.
Air Force Office of Scientific Research, Air Force Office of Scientific Research Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University

Public Release: 15-Apr-2015
Acta Crystallographica Section B
Combined effort for structural determination
Combining powder diffraction data with electron crystallography can give us a clearer view of modulated structures.
Russian Science Foundation, Research Foundation Flanders

Contact: Jonathan Agbenyega
ja@iucr.org
44-124-434-2878
International Union of Crystallography

Public Release: 15-Apr-2015
Scientific Reports
Scientists develop mesh that captures oil -- but lets water through
A stainless steel mesh with a high-tech coating captures oil, but water passes right through. With further development, the researchers say, 'you could potentially catch an oil spill with a net.'
American Chemical Society Petroleum Research Fund, National Science Foundation

Contact: Pam Frost Gorder
Gorder.1@osu.edu
614-292-9475
Ohio State University

Public Release: 14-Apr-2015
Nature Nanotechnology
Graphene pushes the speed limit of light-to-electricity conversion
Researchers from ICFO, MIT and UC Riverside have been able to develop a graphene-based photodetector capable of converting absorbed light into an electrical voltage at ultrafast timescales.

Contact: Alina Hirschmann
alina.hirschmann@icfo.es
34-935-542-246
ICFO-The Institute of Photonic Sciences

Public Release: 14-Apr-2015
ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces
Taking aircraft manufacturing out of the oven
Aerospace engineers at MIT have now developed a carbon nanotube film that can heat and solidify a composite without the need for massive ovens. When connected to an electrical power source, and wrapped over a multilayer polymer composite, the heated film stimulates the polymer to solidify.
Airbus Group, Boeing, Embraer, Lockheed Martin, Saab AB, TohoTenax, ANSYS Inc., Air Force Research Laboratory at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, US Army Research Office

Contact: Abby Abazorius
abbya@mit.edu
617-253-2709
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 13-Apr-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Gold by special delivery intensifies cancer-killing radiation
Researchers at Brown and the University of Rhode Island have demonstrated what could become a more precise method for targeting cancer cells for radiation. The method would use cancer-seeking peptides to ferry nanoparticles of gold to the site. The gold then helps focus radiation on the cancer cells.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Kevin Stacey
kevin_stacey@brown.edu
401-863-3766
Brown University

Public Release: 13-Apr-2015
Nature Communications
On the road to spin-orbitronics
Berkeley Lab researchers have discovered a new way of manipulating the magnetic domain walls in ultrathin magnets that could one day revolutionize the electronics industry through a technology called 'spin-orbitronics.'
US Department of Energy

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 13-Apr-2015
Nature Materials
Solution-grown nanowires make the best lasers
Take a material that is a focus of interest in the quest for advanced solar cells. Discover a 'freshman chemistry level' technique for growing that material into high-efficiency, ultra-small lasers. The result, disclosed Monday, April 13, in Nature Materials, is a shortcut to lasers that are extremely efficient and able to create many colors of light.
DOE/Basic Energy Sciences Program

Contact: Song Jin
jin@chem.wisc.edu
608-262-1562
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Public Release: 10-Apr-2015
NASA chooses UT Arlington team to develop potential Mars mission technology
NASA has selected UT Arlington as one of four US institutions to develop improved methods for oxygen recovery and reuse aboard human spacecraft, a technology the agency says is crucial to 'enable our human journey to Mars and beyond.'
NASA

Contact: Herb Booth
hbooth@uta.edu
817-272-7075
University of Texas at Arlington

Public Release: 10-Apr-2015
ACS Nano
How many gold atoms make gold metal?
Researchers at the Nanoscience Center at the University of Jyväskylä, Finland, have shown that dramatic changes in the electronic properties of nanometer-sized chunks of gold occur in well-defined size range. Small gold nanoclusters could be used, for instance, in short-term storage of energy or electric charge in the field of molecular electronics.
The Academy of Finland

Contact: Hannu Häkkinen
hannu.j.hakkinen@jyu.fi
358-400-247-973
Academy of Finland

Public Release: 10-Apr-2015
Science Advances
Electrical control of quantum bits in silicon paves the way to large quantum computers
A UNSW-led research team has encoded quantum information in silicon using simple electrical pulses for the first time, bringing the construction of affordable large-scale quantum computers one step closer to reality.
Australian Research Council, US Army Research Office, NSW Government, UNSW Australia, University of Melbourne

Contact: Dan Wheelahan
d.wheelahan@unsw.edu.au
61-435-930-465
University of New South Wales

Showing releases 1526-1550 out of 1846.

<< < 57 | 58 | 59 | 60 | 61 | 62 | 63 | 64 | 65 | 66 > >>