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Nanotechnology

News Releases

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 26-50 out of 1914.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 > >>

Public Release: 14-Jun-2017
Science Advances
Graphene encapsulation provides unprecedented view of the diffusion and rotation of fullerene molecu
Scientists at the University of Vienna have created a new structure by encapsulating a single layer of fullerene molecules between two graphene sheets. Buckyball sandwiches combine fullerenes and graphene. This structure allows to study the dynamics of the trapped molecules down to atomic resolution using scanning transmission electron microscopy. They report observing diffusion of individual molecules confined in the two-dimensional space and even find evidence for the rotation of isolated fullerenes within the structure.

Contact: Jannik C. Meyer
jannik.meyer@univie.ac.at
43-142-777-2810
University of Vienna

Public Release: 14-Jun-2017
Angewandte Chemie International Edition
Solar material for producing clean hydrogen fuel
Osaka University researchers create new material based on gold and black phosphorus to produce clean hydrogen fuel using the full spectrum of sunlight.
The Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology

Contact: Saori Obayashi
saori_obayashi@mail.osaka-u.ac.jp
81-661-055-886
Osaka University

Public Release: 14-Jun-2017
Advanced Electronic Materials
Special journal issue showcases Aalto University's materials research
The 12 articles in the special issue of Advanced Electronic Materials investigate materials and devices that are being researched for their applications in micro-electronics, opto-electronics, thermo-electricity generation, photovoltaics and quantum technologies.

Contact: Patrick Rinke
patrick.rinke@aalto.fi
Aalto University

Public Release: 14-Jun-2017
Nature Communications
Breakthrough by Queen's University paves way for smaller electronic devices
Queen's University Belfast researchers have discovered a new way to create extremely thin electrically conducting sheets, which could revolutionize the tiny electronic devices that control everything from smart phones to banking and medical technology.
Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council

Contact: Emma Gallagher
emma.gallagher@qub.ac.uk
289-097-5384
Queen's University Belfast

Public Release: 13-Jun-2017
Nature Biomedical Engineering
3-D-printed patch helps guide growing blood vessels
A research team led by Boston University Biomedical Engineering Professor Christopher Chen is pioneering an infused 3-D-printed patch that guides the growth of new blood vessels, avoiding some of the problems with other approaches to treating ischemia.

Contact: Christopher Chen
chencs@bu.edu
617-353-1699
Boston University College of Engineering

Public Release: 13-Jun-2017
Advanced Functional Materials
UMD bioengineers develop new technologies to drive next-generation therapies for MS
Researchers in the University of Maryland Fischell Department of Bioengineering Jewell Laboratory are using quantum dots -- tiny semiconductor particles commonly used in nanotechnology -- to decipher the features needed to design specific and effective therapies for multiple sclerosis (MS) and other autoimmune diseases.
Naval Research Laboratory's Nanoscience Institute, National Multiple Sclerosis Society, National Science Foundation, US Department of Defense SMART Graduate Fellowship Program

Contact: Alyssa Wolice
awolice@umd.edu
301-405-3936
University of Maryland

Public Release: 13-Jun-2017
Nature Communications
Graphene transistor could mean computers that are 1,000 times faster
Transistors based on graphene ribbons could result in much faster, more efficient computers and other devices. Researchers use a magnetic field to control current flow.

Contact: Mark Schlueb
mark.schlueb@ucf.edu
407-823-0221
University of Central Florida

Public Release: 13-Jun-2017
Journal of Applied Physics
Magnets, all the way down!
If you can't move electrons around to study how factors like symmetry impact the larger-scale magnetic effects, what can you do instead? It turns out that assemblies of metallic nanoparticles, which can be carefully arranged at multiple length scales, behave like bulk magnets and display intriguing, shape-dependent behavior. The effects, reported this week in the Journal of Applied Physics, could help improve high-density information storage and spintronics technologies.

Contact: Julia Majors
media@aip.org
301-209-3090
American Institute of Physics

Public Release: 13-Jun-2017
Chemical Communications
Hybrid membrane creates a stir on the global market
ETH Professor Raffaele Mezzenga and his senior researcher Sreenath Bolisetty have developed a filter membrane that efficiently removes heavy metals and other toxic substances from water. Strong demand for the new technology has encouraged them to set up a new ETH spin-off, BluAct Technologies.

Contact: Prof. Dr. Raffaele Mezzenga
raffaele.mezzenga@hest.ethz.ch
41-446-329-140
ETH Zurich

Public Release: 13-Jun-2017
£1.4M EPSRC Fellowship for physicist
A Lancaster University physicist has been awarded a £1.4M EPSRC Career Fellowship over five years. Dr Dmitry Zmeev is a member of the Lancaster Low Temperature group, which has a strong international reputation for performing state-of-the-art experiments at the lowest achievable temperature on earth. He was selected after a competitive evaluation by the EPSRC.
Engineering and Physics Sciences Research Council in UK

Contact: gillian.whitworth@lancaster.ac.uk
gillian.whitworth@lancaster.ac.uk
44-015-245-92612
Lancaster University

Public Release: 13-Jun-2017
Nanoparticles: What is their fate and how do they change?
Despite the constant increase in the use of industrially manufactured nanomaterials (NM), little is known about their fate after being released into the air and ingested into the body through inhalation. A further question is, if NM may cause adverse health effects in the bronchial tract and in the alveolae in the lungs.
Federal Ministry of Education and Research

Contact: Suzan Fiack
pressestelle@bfr.bund.de
0049-301-841-24300
BfR Federal Institute for Risk Assessment

Public Release: 13-Jun-2017
Advanced Electronic Materials
Active implants: How gold binds to silicone rubber
Flexible electronic parts could significantly improve medical implants. However, electroconductive gold atoms usually hardly bind to silicones. Researchers from the University of Basel have now been able to modify short-chain silicones in a way, that they build strong bonds to gold atoms. The results have been published in the journal Advanced Electronic Materials.

Contact: Prof. Dr. Bert Müller
bert.mueller@unibas.ch
0041-612-075-431
University of Basel

Public Release: 12-Jun-2017
Nature Photonics
Learning with light: New system allows optical 'deep learning'
A team of researchers at MIT and elsewhere has come up with a new approach to complex computations, using light instead of electricity. The approach could vastly improve the speed and efficiency of such learning systems.

Contact: Karl-Lydie Jean-Baptiste
kjeanbap@mit.edu
617-253-1682
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 12-Jun-2017
Lab on a Chip
Lab on a chip could monitor health, germs and pollutants
Imagine wearing a device that continuously analyzes your sweat or blood for different types of biomarkers, such as proteins that show you may have breast cancer or lung cancer. Rutgers engineers have invented biosensor technology -- known as a lab on a chip -- that could be used in hand-held or wearable devices to monitor your health and exposure to dangerous bacteria, viruses and pollutants.
National Science Foundation.

Contact: Todd B. Bates
tbates@ucm.rutgers.edu
848-932-0550
Rutgers University

Public Release: 12-Jun-2017
Science Advances
Chemists perform surgery on nanoparticles
A team of chemists led by Carnegie Mellon's Rongchao Jin has for the first time conducted site-specific surgery on a nanoparticle. The procedure, which allows for the precise tailoring of nanoparticles, stands to advance the field of nanochemistry by allowing researchers to enhance nanoparticles' functional properties, such as catalytic activity and photoluminescence, increasing their usefulness in a wide variety of fields including health care, electronics and manufacturing.
Air Force Office of Scientific Research, National Science Foundation

Contact: Jocelyn Duffy
jhduffy@andrew.cmu.edu
412-268-9982
Carnegie Mellon University

Public Release: 12-Jun-2017
Optics Express
Optics Express celebrates 20 years of innovative research and scientific impact
The Optical Society (OSA) is celebrating 20 years of its bold experiment -- the rapid publication, open access Journal, Optics Express. Optics Express was developed in 1997 as a testbed to explore the capabilities of all-electronic publishing, and simultaneously launched what is now known as Gold open access publishing.

Contact: Joshua Miller
jmiller@osa.org
202-416-1435
The Optical Society

Public Release: 12-Jun-2017
EPJ Plus
Imaging helps to spot fake ancient daggers
Collectors have become increasingly interested in weapons from ancient Asia and the Middle East. Attempting to fight forgeries, physicists are now adding their imaging power to authenticate these weapons. In a study published in EPJ Plus, an Italian team, working with the Wallace Collection, London and the Neutron Imaging team at the Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin, has demonstrated the usefulness of such a combined imaging approach to help museum curators in their quest to ensure authenticity.

Contact: Sabine Lehr
sabine.lehr@springer.com
49-622-148-78336
Springer

Public Release: 10-Jun-2017
Advanced Materials
UNIST researchers engineer transformer-like carbon nanostructure
A research team, led by South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology has engineered a new type of carbon nanomaterials, capable of changing shapes and colors depending on the type of solvents used. Their findings appeared in the prestigious journal, Advanced Materials.

Contact: JooHyeon Heo
joohyeonheo@unist.ac.kr
82-522-171-223
Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology(UNIST)

Public Release: 9-Jun-2017
International Society for Extracellular Vesicles Conference
New blood test uses nanotechnology to predict aggressive prostate cancer accurately
A new diagnostic developed by Alberta scientists will allow men to bypass painful biopsies to test for aggressive prostate cancer. The test incorporates a unique nanotechnology platform to make the diagnostic using only a single drop of blood, and is significantly more accurate than current screening methods.
Alberta Cancer Foundation, Prostate Cancer Canada, Bird Dogs for Prostate Cancer Research

Contact: Ross Neitz
rneitz@ualberta.ca
780-492-5986
University of Alberta Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry

Public Release: 9-Jun-2017
Journal of the American Chemical Society
Mussels add muscle to biocompatible fibers
Rice University chemists use the sticky substance found in mussels to develop self-assembling, biocompatible macroscale fibers that can be used as scaffolds for directed cell growth.
Robert A. Welch Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University

Public Release: 9-Jun-2017
Scientific Reports
Chemists brought mixed folded proteins to life
Scientists from ITMO University in Saint Petersburg and Hebrew University in Jerusalem have found a way to recover a protein structure after its chemical denaturation. The method is based on electrostatic interaction between folded, or denatured, proteins and alumina, which unwrap them. Importantly, this technique works for multiprotein systems -- nobody has been able to recover mixtures of enzymes before. This can help simplify and cheapen the production of drug proteins for Alzheimer's and Parkinson's treatment. The study appeared in Scientific Reports.
Russian Science Foundation

Contact: Dmitry Malkov
dvmalkov@corp.ifmo.ru
7-953-377-5508
ITMO University

Public Release: 9-Jun-2017
Scientific Reports
Chemists brought mixed folded proteins to life
Scientists from ITMO University in Saint Petersburg and Hebrew University in Jerusalem have found a way to recover a protein structure after its chemical denaturation. The method is based on electrostatic interaction between folded, or denatured, proteins and alumina, which unwrap them. Importantly, this technique works for multiprotein systems -- nobody has been able to recover mixtures of enzymes before. This can help simplify and cheapen the production of drug proteins for Alzheimer's and Parkinson's treatment. The study appeared in Scientific Reports.
Russian Science Foundation

Contact: Dmitry Malkov
dvmalkov@corp.ifmo.ru
7-953-377-5508
ITMO University

Public Release: 9-Jun-2017
Microscopy
Graphene enhancing our vision of the infinitely small
OIST researchers report using one-atom-thin graphene film to drastically enhance the quality of electron microscopy images.
Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University

Contact: Kaoru Natori
kaoru.natori@oist.jp
81-989-662-389
Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology (OIST) Graduate University

Public Release: 9-Jun-2017
Science Advances
New form of carbon that's hard as a rock, yet elastic, like rubber
Carbon is an element of seemingly infinite possibilities. This is because the configuration of its electrons allows for numerous self-bonding combinations that give rise to a range of materials with varying properties. A team including several Carnegie scientists has developed a form of ultrastrong, lightweight carbon that is also elastic and electrically conductive. A material with such a unique combination of properties could serve a wide variety of applications from aerospace engineering to military armor.

Contact: Tim Strobel
tstrobel@carnegiescience.edu
202-478-8943
Carnegie Institution for Science

Public Release: 8-Jun-2017
Nanoscale
Nanotechnology reveals hidden depths of bacterial 'machines'
New research from the University of Liverpool, published in the journal Nanoscale, has probed the structure and material properties of protein machines in bacteria, which have the capacity to convert carbon dioxide into sugar through photosynthesis.
Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council, Royal Society University Research Fellowship

Contact: Nicola Frost
nicola.frost@liverpool.ac.uk
University of Liverpool

Showing releases 26-50 out of 1914.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 > >>