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Nanotechnology

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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 276-300 out of 1892.

<< < 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 > >>

Public Release: 15-Feb-2017
Nature Materials
A new spin on electronics
Modern computer technology is based on the transport of electric charge in semiconductors. But this technology's potential will be reaching its limits in the near future, since the components deployed cannot be miniaturized further. But, there is another option: using an electron's spin, instead of its charge, to transmit information. A team of scientists from Munich and Kyoto is now demonstrating how this works.
German Research Foundation, Nanosystems Initiative Munich

Contact: Dr. Andreas Battenberg
battenberg@zv.tum.de
49-892-891-0510
Technical University of Munich (TUM)

Public Release: 15-Feb-2017
Nano Letters
Good vibrations help reveal molecular details
Rice University scientists develop a method to obtain structural details on molecules in lipid membranes near gold nanoparticles. Their method, called SABERS, could help researchers who study drug delivery and amyloid interactions implicated in neurodegenerative disease.
Robert A. Welch Foundation, Lockheed Martin

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University

Public Release: 15-Feb-2017
Nanotechnology based gene editing to eradicate HIV brain reservoir in drug abusers
The study will use nanotechnology with magneto electric nanoparticles (MENPs) to deliver drugs across the blood brain barrier in conjunction with the Cas9/gRNA gene editing strategy that has shown great promise in finding and destroying copies of HIV that have burrowed into the host's genome.
National Institutes for Health

Contact: Ileana Varela
ilvarela@fiu.edu
305-348-4926
Florida International University

Public Release: 15-Feb-2017
Metal-organic frameworks used as looms
Researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) have made major progress in the production of two-dimensional polymer-based materials. To produce cloths from monomolecular threads, the scientists used SURMOFs, i.e. surface-mounted metal-organic frameworks, developed by KIT. They inserted four-armed monomers, i.e. smaller molecular building blocks, into some SURMOF layers. Cross-linking of the monomers then resulted in textiles consisting of interwoven polymer threads. This work is now presented in Nature Communications. (DOI: 10.1038/ncomms14442)

Contact: Monika Landgraf
presse@kit.edu
49-721-608-47414
Karlsruher Institut für Technologie (KIT)

Public Release: 15-Feb-2017
ACS Nano
Is a stretchable smart tablet in our future?
Engineering researchers at Michigan State University have developed the first stretchable integrated circuit that is made entirely using an inkjet printer, raising the possibility of inexpensive mass production of smart fabric.

Contact: Andy Henion
henion@msu.edu
517-355-3294
Michigan State University

Public Release: 15-Feb-2017
PLOS ONE
CSIC develops a biosensor able to detect HIV only one week after infection
A team from the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) has developed a biosensor that can detect type 1 HIV during the first week after infection. The experiments, performed on human serum, detect the p24 antigen, a protein present in the HIV-1 virus. This new technology, which has been patented by CSIC, detects the protein at concentrations 100,000 times lower than in current techniques.

Contact: Ainhoa Goñi
ainhoa.goni@csic.es
34-915-681-473
Spanish National Research Council (CSIC)

Public Release: 15-Feb-2017
Nature
How to roll a nanotube: Demystifying carbon nanotubes' structure control
A key advancement in the design of high performance carbon-based electronics.

Contact: Dahee Carol Kim
clitie620@ibs.re.kr
Institute for Basic Science

Public Release: 14-Feb-2017
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
A new contrast agent for MRI
A specially coated iron oxide nanoparticle could provide an alternative to conventional gadolinium-based contrast agents used for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In rare cases, the currently used gadolinium agents have been found to produce adverse effects in patients with impaired kidney function.
MIT-Harvard NIH Center for Cancer Nanotechnology, Army Research Office through MIT's Institute for Soldier Nanotechnologies, NIH-funded Laser Biomedical Research Center, MIT Deshpande Center, European Union Seventh Framework Program

Contact: Ms. Karl-Lydie Jean-Baptiste
kjeanbap@mit.edu
617-253-1682
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 14-Feb-2017
APL Materials
Turning up the heat for perfect (nano)diamonds
For use in quantum sensing, the bulk nanodiamond crystal surrounding the point defect must be highly perfect. Any deviation from perfection will adversely affect the quantum behavior of the material. Highly perfect nanodiamonds are also quite expensive and difficult to make. A cheaper alternative, say researchers, is to take defect-ridden, low-quality, commercially manufactured diamonds, and then 'heal' them. In APL Materials, they describe a method to heal diamond nanocrystals under high-temperature conditions.

Contact: AIP Media Line
media@aip.org
301-209-3090
American Institute of Physics

Public Release: 14-Feb-2017
NASA and MIT Collaborate to develop space-based quantum-dot spectrometer
A NASA technologist has teamed with the inventor of a new nanotechnology that could transform the way space scientists build spectrometers, the all-important device used by virtually all scientific disciplines to measure the properties of light emanating from astronomical objects, including Earth itself.
NASA

Contact: lori keesey
lori.keesey@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Public Release: 14-Feb-2017
Biomaterials
A nanofiber matrix for healing
A new nanofiber-on-microfiber matrix could help produce more and better quality stem cells for disease treatment and regenerative therapies.
Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization

Contact: Izumi Mindy Takamiya
ias-oappr@mail2.adm.kyoto-u.ac.jp
81-757-539-755
Kyoto University

Public Release: 14-Feb-2017
Nature Communications
Learning how to fine-tune nanofabrication
Researchers developed a new computational method that may be used to produce tiny wires with diameters 1/100,000th that of a piece of hair, or tiny electrical circuits that can fit on the tip of a needle.
Japan Science and Technology Agency's PRESTO

Contact: Izumi Mindy Takamiya
ias-oappr@mail2.adm.kyoto-u.ac.jp
81-757-539-755
Kyoto University

Public Release: 14-Feb-2017
Advanced Functional Materials
Tiny magnetic implant offers new drug delivery method
University of British Columbia researchers have developed a magnetic drug implant -- the first of its kind in Canada -- that could offer an alternative for patients struggling with numerous pills or intravenous injections.

Contact: Lou Bosshart
lou.bosshart@ubc.ca
604-999-0473
University of British Columbia

Public Release: 13-Feb-2017
Transactions on Biomedical Engineering
New method to detect ultrasound with light
A tiny, transparent device that fits into a contact lens can determine the speed of blood flow and oxygen metabolic rate at the back of the eye, helping to diagnose diseases such as macular degeneration.

Contact: Megan Fellman
fellman@northwestern.edu
847-491-3115
Northwestern University

Public Release: 13-Feb-2017
Nature
New mechanical metamaterials can block symmetry of motion, findings suggest
Engineers and scientists at The University of Texas at Austin and the AMOLF institute in the Netherlands have invented the first mechanical metamaterials that easily transfer motion effortlessly in one direction while blocking it in the other.
Air Force Office of Scientific Research, Office of Naval Research, National Science Foundation, Simons Foundation and Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research

Contact: Sandra Zaragoza
Zaragoza@utexas.edu
512-471-2129
University of Texas at Austin

Public Release: 13-Feb-2017
Nature Protocols
Now you can 'build your own' bio-bot
For the past several years, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have been developing a class of walking 'bio-bots' powered by muscle cells and controlled with electrical and optical pulses. Now, Rashid Bashir's research group is sharing the recipe for the current generation of bio-bots. Their how-to paper is the cover article in Nature Protocols.

Contact: Rashid Bashir
rbashir@illinois.edu
217-333-1867
University of Illinois College of Engineering

Public Release: 13-Feb-2017
Chemistry - A European Journal
Organo-metal compound seen killing cancer cells from inside
Researchers have witnessed -- for the first time -- cancer cells being targeted and destroyed from the inside, by an organo-metal compound discovered by the University of Warwick.
Cancer Research UK, Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council, The Wellcome Trust, European Research Council

Contact: Luke Walton
L.Walton.1@warwick.ac.uk
44-078-245-40863
University of Warwick

Public Release: 13-Feb-2017
Nano Letters
A new platform to study graphene's electronic properties
IBS scientists model the electronic structure of graphene.
IBS

Contact: Dahee Carol Kim
clitie620@ibs.re.kr
Institute for Basic Science

Public Release: 13-Feb-2017
Nature Communications
The ultimate green technology
Imagine patterning and visualizing silicon at the atomic level, something which, if done successfully, will revolutionize the quantum and classical computing industry. A team of scientists in Edmonton, Canada has done just that, led by a world-renowned physicist and his up-and-coming protégé.

Contact: Jennifer Pascoe
jennifer.pascoe@ualberta.ca
780-492-8813
University of Alberta

Public Release: 10-Feb-2017
Nano Letters
Nano-level lubricant tuning improves material for electronic devices and surface coatings
Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have developed a new approach to dynamically tune the micro- and nano-scale roughness of atomically thin MoS2, and consequently the appropriate degree of hydrophobicity for various potential MoS2-based applications.

Contact: SungWoo Nam
swnam@illinois.edu
217-300-0267
University of Illinois College of Engineering

Public Release: 9-Feb-2017
APL Photonics
Meta-lenses bring benchtop performance to small, hand-held spectrometer
A research team of physicists from Harvard University has developed new hand-held spectrometers capable of the same performance as large, benchtop instruments. The researchers' innovation explained this week in APL Photonics, from AIP Publishing, derives from their groundbreaking work in meta-lenses. The hand-held spectrometers offer real promise for applications ranging from health care diagnostics to environmental and food monitoring.
Air Force Office of Scientific Research, Center for Nanoscale Systems, National Nanotechnology Coordinated Infrastructure Network

Contact: AIP Media Line
media@aip.org
301-209-3090
American Institute of Physics

Public Release: 9-Feb-2017
Metamaterial: Mail armor inspires physicists
The Middle Ages certainly were far from being science-friendly: Whoever looked for new findings off the beaten track faced the threat of being burned at the stake. Hence, the contribution of this era to technical progress is deemed to be rather small. Scientists of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), however, were inspired by medieval mail armor when producing a new metamaterial with novel properties. They succeeded in reversing the Hall coefficient of a material.

Contact: Monika Landgraf
presse@kit.edu
49-721-608-47414
Karlsruher Institut für Technologie (KIT)

Public Release: 9-Feb-2017
NANO
Researchers optimize the assembly of micro-/meso-/macroporous carbon for Li-S batteries
High volume ratio of carbon micropores combined with the assembly of meso-/macropores remarkably improve the capabilities of Li-S batteries, which relieve shuttle effect by strong physical absorption from micropores, increase sulfur content and supply abundant avenue for electrolyte infiltration and ion transportation by meso-/macropores.
Chinese Academy of Science, Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities of China

Contact: Chin Wanying
wychin@wspc.com
656-466-5775
World Scientific

Public Release: 8-Feb-2017
Tissue Engineering, Part A
Silver ion-coated medical devices could fight MRSA while creating new bone
The rise of MRSA infections is limiting the treatment options for physicians and surgeons. Now, an international team of researchers, led by Elizabeth Loboa, dean of the University of Missouri College of Engineering, has used silver ion-coated scaffolds, or biomaterials that are created to hold stem cells, which slow the spread of or kill MRSA while regenerating new bone. Scientists feel that the biodegradable and biocompatible scaffolds could be the first step in the fight against MRSA in patients.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation

Contact: Jeff Sossamon
sossamonj@missouri.edu
573-882-3346
University of Missouri-Columbia

Public Release: 8-Feb-2017
Nano Letters
Flat lens opens a broad world of color
SEAS researchers have developed the first flat lens that works within a continual bandwidth of colors, from blue to green. This bandwidth, close to that of an LED, paves the way for new applications in imaging, spectroscopy and sensing.
Air Force Office of Scientific Research

Contact: Leah Burrows
lburrows@seas.harvard.edu
617-496-1351
Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences

Showing releases 276-300 out of 1892.

<< < 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 > >>