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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 276-300 out of 1847.

<< < 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 > >>

Public Release: 7-Jul-2016
NJIT receives $1 million grant from Keck Foundation for pioneering research in biophysics and nanotechnology
New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT) has received a $1 million grant from the W.M. Keck Foundation for a three-year project titled 'Engineering New Materials Based on Topological Phonon Edge Modes.'

Contact: Tanya Klein
New Jersey Institute of Technology

Public Release: 7-Jul-2016
Nature Communications
Researchers harness DNA as the engine of super-efficient nanomachine
Researchers at McMaster University have established a way to harness DNA as the engine of a microscopic 'machine' they can turn on to detect trace amounts of substances that range from viruses and bacteria to cocaine and metals.

Contact: John Brennan
905-525-9140 x20706
McMaster University

Public Release: 6-Jul-2016
Nature Communications
Researchers improve performance of cathode material by controlling oxygen activity
An international team of researchers has demonstrated a new way to increase the robustness and energy storage capability of a particular class of 'lithium-rich' cathode materials -- by using a carbon dioxide-based gas mixture to create oxygen vacancies at the material's surface. Researchers said the treatment improved the energy density -- the amount of energy stored per unit mass -- of the cathode material by up to 30 to 40 percent.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Liezel Labios
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 6-Jul-2016
Angewandte Chemie International Edition
On the path toward molecular robots
Scientists at Hokkaido University have developed light-powered molecular motors that repetitively bend and unbend, bringing us closer to molecular robots.
PRESTO of Japan Science and Technology Agency, CRIS OPEN FACILITY at Hokkaido University, Japan

Contact: Naoki NAMBA
Hokkaido University

Public Release: 6-Jul-2016
Flipping crystals improves solar-cell performance
In a step that could bring perovskite crystals closer to use in the burgeoning solar power industry, researchers from Los Alamos National Laboratory, Northwestern University and Rice University have tweaked their crystal production method and developed a new type of two-dimensional layered perovskite with outstanding stability and more than triple the material's previous power conversion efficiency.

Contact: Nancy Ambrosiano
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Public Release: 6-Jul-2016
Journal of the American Ceramic Society
'Origami' is reshaping DNA's future
Ten years after Paul Rothemund knitted tiny smiley faces from strands of DNA, the field of DNA origami is coming of age. Three nanoscience pioneers -- including Rothemund of the California Institute of Technology, William Shih of Harvard Medical School and Shawn Douglas of the University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine -- discuss the technique's potential.

Contact: Jim Cohen
The Kavli Foundation

Public Release: 5-Jul-2016
Nature Nanotechnology
Integrated trio of 2-D nanomaterials unlocks graphene electronics applications
Titled 'An integrated Tantalum Sulfide--Boron Nitride--Graphene Oscillator: A Charge-Density-Wave Device Operating at Room Temperature,' the paper describes the development of the first useful device that exploits the potential of charge-density waves to modulate an electrical current through a 2-D material. The new technology could become an ultralow power alternative to conventional silicon-based devices, which are used in thousands of applications from computers to clocks to radios.
National Science Foundation, Semiconductor Research Corporation Nanoelectronic Research Initiative, Semiconductor Research Corporation, Defense Advanced Research Project Agency, others

Contact: Sarah Nightingale
University of California - Riverside

Public Release: 5-Jul-2016
Nature Nanotechnology
From super to ultra-resolution microscopy
A team at Harvard's Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering has, for the first time, been able to tell apart features distanced only 5 nanometers from each other in a densely packed, single molecular structure and to achieve the so far highest resolution in optical microscopy. Reported on July 4 in a study in Nature Nanotechnology, the technology, also called 'discrete molecular imaging', enhances the team's DNA nanotechnology-powered super-resolution microscopy platform with an integrated set of new imaging methods.

Contact: Benjamin Boettner
Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard

Public Release: 5-Jul-2016
Penn chemists establish fundamentals of ferroelectric materials
Chemists from the University of Pennsylvania are enabling the next generation of research into ferroelectric materials. In a new study, published in Nature, they demonstrate a multiscale simulation of lead titanate oxide that provides new understanding about what it takes for polarizations within these materials to switch.
National Science Foundation, Office of Naval Research, US Department of Energy, Carnegie Institution for Science

Contact: Evan Lerner
University of Pennsylvania

Public Release: 4-Jul-2016
Nature Communications
A little impurity makes nanolasers shine: ANU media release
Scientists at The Australian National University have improved the performance of tiny lasers by adding impurities, in a discovery which will be central to the development of low-cost biomedical sensors, quantum computing, and a faster internet. Researcher Tim Burgess added atoms of zinc to lasers one hundredth the diameter of a human hair and made of gallium arsenide -- a material used extensively in smartphones and other electronic devices,.

Contact: Tim Burgess
Australian National University

Public Release: 3-Jul-2016
Nature Communications
Building a better bowtie
Bowtie-shaped nanostructures may advance the development of quantum devices.

Contact: Yael Edelman
Weizmann Institute of Science

Public Release: 1-Jul-2016
2016 Dirac Medal for Physics to Chapman University's Visiting Professor Sandu Popescu
Professor Sandu Popescu from the University of Bristol and Distinguished Visiting Professor and founding member of the Institute for Quantum Studies (IQS) at Chapman University in California, has won the 2016 Dirac Medal in Physics for his research on fundamental aspects of quantum physics.

Contact: Sheri Ledbetter
Chapman University

Public Release: 1-Jul-2016
Researcher pursues new applications for 'hot' electrons
Three years after his discovery of porous gold nanoparticles -- gold nanoparticles that offer a larger surface area because of their porous nature -- a University of Houston researcher is continuing to explore the science and potential applications.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Jeannie Kever
University of Houston

Public Release: 29-Jun-2016
A drop of water as a model for the interplay of adhesion and stiction
Physicists at the University of Zurich have developed a system that enables them to switch back and forth the adhesion and stiction (static friction) of a water drop on a solid surface. The change in voltage is expressed macroscopically in the contact angle between the drop and the surface. This effect can be attributed to the change in the surface properties on the nanometer scale.

Contact: Thomas Greber
University of Zurich

Public Release: 28-Jun-2016
NSF grants IU $525,000 to advance research on molecular transformation, carbon recycling
Two Indiana University chemists have received $525,000 from the National Science Foundation to advance research with applications to the emerging field of carbon recycling.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Kevin Fryling
Indiana University

Public Release: 28-Jun-2016
New mid-infrared laser system could detect atmospheric chemicals
MIT researchers have found a way to use mid-infrared lasers to turn molecules in the open air into glowing filaments of electrically charged gas, or plasma. The method could make possible remote environmental monitoring to detect chemicals with high sensitivity.
US Air Force/Office of Scientific Research

Contact: Karl-Lydie
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 28-Jun-2016
Engineers to use cyborg insects as biorobotic sensing machines
A team of engineers from Washington University in St. Louis wants to capitalize on the sense of smell in locusts to create new biorobotic sensing systems that could be used in homeland security applications.
Office of Naval Research

Contact: Erika Ebsworth-Goold
Washington University in St. Louis

Public Release: 28-Jun-2016
One giant leap for the future of safe drug delivery
By using an innovative 3-D inkjet printing method, researchers from Chemical and Biological Engineering at the University of Sheffield have taken the biggest step yet in producing microscopic silk swimming devices that are biodegradable and harmless to a biological system.
Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council

Contact: Sophie Hylands
University of Sheffield - Faculty of Engineering

Public Release: 28-Jun-2016
Journal of Chemical Physics
Tiniest imperfections make big impacts in nano-patterned materials
A research team at Clarkson University reports an interesting conclusion that could have major impacts on the future of nano-manufacturing. Their analysis for a model of the process of random sequential adsorption shows that even a small imprecision in the position of the lattice landing sites can dramatically affect the density of the permanently formed deposit.

Contact: AIP Media Line
American Institute of Physics

Public Release: 27-Jun-2016
PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases
Mobile, phone-based microscopes work well in the field with minimal training
Handheld, mobile phone-based microscopes can be used in developing countries after minimal training of community laboratory technicians to diagnose intestinal parasites quickly and accurately.
Grand Challenges Canada

Contact: Alexandra Radkewycz
University Health Network

Public Release: 27-Jun-2016
Nature Nanotechnology
Building a smart cardiac patch
Harvard researchers have created nanoscale electronic scaffolds that can be seeded with cardiac cells to produce a 'bionic' cardiac patch.

Contact: Peter Reuell
Harvard University

Public Release: 27-Jun-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
UH researchers discover a new method to boost oil recovery
As oil producers struggle to adapt to lower prices, getting as much oil as possible out of every well has become even more important, despite concerns from nearby residents that some chemicals used to boost production may pollute underground water resources. Researchers from the University of Houston have reported the discovery of a nanotechnology-based solution that could address both issues -- achieving 15 percent tertiary oil recovery at low cost, without the large volume of chemicals used in most commercial fluids.

Contact: Jeannie Kever
University of Houston

Public Release: 26-Jun-2016
Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society A
A shampoo bottle that empties completely -- every last drop
Researchers at The Ohio State University have found a way to create the perfect texture on plastic to let soap products flow freely out of the bottle.

Contact: Pam Frost Gorder
Ohio State University

Public Release: 24-Jun-2016
Advanced Optical Materials
'Flower Power': Photovoltaic cells replicate rose petals
With a surface resembling that of plants, solar cells improve light-harvesting and thus generate more power. Scientists at KIT reproduced the epidermal cells of rose petals that have particularly good antireflection properties and integrated the transparent replicas into an organic solar cell. This resulted in a relative efficiency gain of twelve percent. An article on this subject has been published recently in the Advanced Optical Materials journal.

Contact: Monika Landgraf
Karlsruher Institut für Technologie (KIT)

Public Release: 24-Jun-2016
Top story for cancer research
A team of researchers led by Dr. Friederike J. Gruhl and Professor Andrew C. B. Cato at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) are developing a three-dimensional model for prostate cancer research based on cryogels. The model will be used to reproduce natural processes and above all to examine the development and the progression of tumors. A current paper on this project published in the scientific journal Small (DOI: 10.1002/smll.201600683).

Contact: Monika Landgraf
Karlsruher Institut für Technologie (KIT)

Showing releases 276-300 out of 1847.

<< < 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 > >>