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Nanotechnology

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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 901-925 out of 1938.

<< < 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 | 37 | 38 | 39 | 40 | 41 > >>

Public Release: 25-Aug-2016
Nature Communications
Graphene under pressure
Small balloons made from one-atom-thick material graphene can withstand enormous pressures, much higher than those at the bottom of the deepest ocean, scientists at the University of Manchester report.

Contact: Daniel Cochlin
daniel.cochlin@manchester.ac.uk
44-161-275-8382
University of Manchester

Public Release: 24-Aug-2016
American Chemical Society 252nd National Meeting & Exposition
ACS Central Science
New electrical energy storage material shows its power
A new material developed by Northwestern University chemist William Dichtel and his team could one day speed up the charging process of electric cars and help increase their driving range. The modified covalent organic framework (COF) material combines the ability to store large amounts of electrical energy or charge, like a battery, and the ability to charge and discharge rapidly, like a supercapacitor, into one device. The researchers built a prototype device capable of powering an LED for 30 seconds.
National Science Foundation, Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation, US Army Research Office

Contact: Megan Fellman
fellman@northwestern.edu
847-491-3115
Northwestern University

Public Release: 24-Aug-2016
Nature Nanotechnology
50 years after the release of the film 'Fantastic Voyage,' science upstages fiction
Fifty years to the day after the film 'Fantastic Voyage' was first shown in theaters, the Polytechnique Montréal Nanorobotics Laboratory is unveiling a unique medical interventional infrastructure devoted to the fight against cancer. The outcome of 15 years of research conducted by Professor Sylvain Martel and his team, it enables microscopic nanorobotic agents to be guided through the vascular systems of living bodies, delivering drugs to targeted areas.

Contact: Annie Touchette
annie.touchette@polymtl.ca
514-231-8133
Polytechnique Montréal

Public Release: 24-Aug-2016
Scientific Reports
Bio-inspired tire design: Where the rubber meets the road
Anand Jagota, professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering and director of Lehigh's bioengineering program, and his team recently published a paper in Scientific Reports outlining their work creating new bio-inspired film-terminated structures with unique friction characteristics that could have positive industrial implications for, among other things, tires. The paper was co-written by Jagota and lead author Zhenping He along with Ying Bai, Chung-Yuen Hui of Cornell University and Benjamin Levrard, a researcher at Michelin Corporation.
Michelin® International Corporation, National Science Foundation

Contact: Lori Friedman
lof214@lehigh.edu
610-758-3224
Lehigh University

Public Release: 24-Aug-2016
Journal of the Electrochemical Society
Lehigh engineer discovers a high-speed nano-avalanche
Doctoral student Charles McLaren and Professor Himanshu Jain from Lehigh University -- along with colleagues at the University of Marburg in Germany -- have published new findings in the September 2016 issue of the Journal of Electrochemical Society about the process involving transformations in glass that occur under intense electrical and thermal conditions. New understanding of these mechanisms could lead the way to more energy-efficient glass manufacturing, and even glass supercapacitors that leapfrog the performance of batteries now used for electric cars and solar energy.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Lori Friedman
lof214@lehigh.edu
610-758-3224
Lehigh University

Public Release: 23-Aug-2016
ACS Photonics
Silicon nanoparticles trained to juggle light
Silicon nanoparticles based devices would allow to transmit, reflect, or scatter incident light in a specified direction, depending on its intensity. They could be integrated into microchips that would enable ultrafast all-optical signal processing in optical communication lines and the next generation optical computers.

Contact: Asya Shepunova
shepunova@phystech.edu
Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology

Public Release: 23-Aug-2016
ACS Synthetic Biology
Analog DNA circuit does math in a test tube
Duke University researchers have created strands of synthetic DNA that, when mixed together in a test tube in the right concentrations, form an analog circuit that can add, subtract and multiply as the molecules form and break bonds. While most DNA circuits are digital, their device performs calculations in an analog fashion by measuring the varying concentrations of specific DNA molecules directly, without requiring special circuitry to convert them to zeroes and ones first.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Robin Ann Smith
ras10@duke.edu
919-681-8057
Duke University

Public Release: 23-Aug-2016
Scientific Reports
Nanofiber scaffolds demonstrate new features in the behavior of stem and cancer cells
A discovery in the field of biomaterials may open new frontiers in stem and cancer cell manipulation and associated advanced therapy development. Novel scaffolds are shown enabling cells to behave in a different but controlled way in vitro due to the presence of aligned, self-assembled ceramic nanofibers of an ultra-high anisotropy ratio augmented into graphene shells.

Contact: Michael Gasik
michael.gasik@aalto.fi
358-505-609-511
Aalto University

Public Release: 23-Aug-2016
Chemistry 2.0: KIT participates in INERATEC spinoff
Apart from teaching and research, innovation is one of the three core tasks of KIT. Consequently, technology transfer from fundamental research to trendsetting products is supported with adequate tools. Now, KIT has decided to participate as a partner in INERATEC GmbH. KIT will invest in this innovative spinoff that may revolutionize chemical process engineering and contribute to the success of the energiewende in the area of chemical energy storage systems.

Contact: Monika Landgraf
presse@kit.edu
49-721-608-47414
Karlsruher Institut für Technologie (KIT)

Public Release: 23-Aug-2016
Bioinspiration & Biomimetics
Nanofur for oil spill cleanup
Some water ferns can absorb large volumes of oil within a short time, because their leaves are strongly water-repellent and, at the same time, highly oil-absorbing. Researchers of KIT, together with colleagues of Bonn University, have found that the oil-binding capacity of the water plant results from the hairy microstructure of its leaves. It is now used as a model to further develop the new Nanofur material for the environmentally friendly cleanup of oil spills.

Contact: Monika Landgraf
presse@kit.edu
49-721-604-47414
Karlsruher Institut für Technologie (KIT)

Public Release: 23-Aug-2016
Nature Chemistry
LiH mediates low-temperature ammonia synthesis
The Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics research group led by Professor Chen Ping demonstrates, for the first time, that the scaling relations on catalytic NH3 synthesis can be 'broken.' Thus, NH3 synthesis under mild reaction conditions can be achieved at an unprecedentedly high rate over a new set of catalysts.

Contact: Lu Xinyi
luxinyi@dicp.ac.cn
86-411-843-79201
Chinese Academy of Sciences Headquarters

Public Release: 23-Aug-2016
American Chemical Society 252nd National Meeting & Exposition
Stretchy supercapacitors power wearable electronics
A future of soft robots or smart T-shirts may depend on the development of stretchy power sources. But traditional batteries are thick and rigid -- not ideal properties for materials that would be used in tiny malleable devices. In a step toward wearable electronics, a team of researchers has produced a stretchy micro-supercapacitor using ribbons of graphene. The researchers present their work at the 252nd National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 22-Aug-2016
Advanced Materials
Researchers reduce expensive noble metals for fuel cell reactions
Washington State University researchers have developed a novel nanomaterial that could improve the performance and lower the costs of fuel cells by using fewer precious metals like platinum or palladium.
Washington State University Start-up Fund

Contact: Yuehe Lin
yuehe.lin@wsu.edu
509-335-8523
Washington State University

Public Release: 22-Aug-2016
New theory could lead to new generation of energy friendly optoelectronics
Researchers at Queen's University Belfast and ETH Zurich, Switzerland, have created a new theoretical framework which could help physicists and device engineers design better optoelectronics, leading to less heat generation and power consumption in electronic devices which source, detect, and control light.
Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council, Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment, National Science Foundation, The Queen's Fellow Award

Contact: Anne-Marie Clarke
comms.officer@qub.ac.uk
44-028-909-75310
Queen's University Belfast

Public Release: 19-Aug-2016
Nano Letters
Spider silk: Mother Nature's bio-superlens
Hot on the heels of a paper revealing that a team at Bangor University's School of Electronic Engineering has used a nanobead-derived superlens to break the perceived resolution barrier, the same team has achieved another world first by using spider silk as a superlens to increase the microscope's potential.
Ser Cymru National Research Networking Advanced Engineering and Materials

Contact: Dr. Zengbo Wang
z.wang@bangor.ac.uk
01-248-383-298
Bangor University

Public Release: 18-Aug-2016
Advanced Optical Materials
Natural scale caterpillar soft robot is powered and controlled with light
Researchers at the Faculty of Physics at the University of Warsaw, using the liquid crystal elastomer technology, originally developed in the LENS Institute in Florence, demonstrated a bioinspired micro-robot capable of mimicking caterpillar gaits in natural scale. The 15-millimeter long soft robot harvests energy from green light and is controlled by spatially modulated laser beam. Apart from traveling on flat surfaces, it can also climb slopes, squeeze through narrow slits and transport loads.
National Science Centre of Poland

Contact: Piotr Wasylczyk
pwasylcz@fuw.edu.pl
48-505-004-059
Faculty of Physics University of Warsaw

Public Release: 18-Aug-2016
Science
A new way to display the 3-D structure of molecules
Berkeley Lab and UC Berkeley Researchers have developed nanoscale display cases that enables new atomic-scale views of hard-to-study chemical and biological samples.

Contact: Glenn Roberts Jr.
geroberts@lbl.gov
510-486-5582
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 17-Aug-2016
Biomaterials
Lab team spins ginger into nanoparticles to heal inflammatory bowel disease
Researchers with the Department of Veterans Affairs and the Institute for Biomedical Sciences at Georgia State University have developed 'edible ginger-derived nanoparticles' that they believe may be good medicine for Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, the two main forms of inflammatory bowel disease. The particles may also help fight cancer linked to colitis, according to experiments in mice.
US Department of Veterans Affairs, National Institutes of Health, Crohn's and Colitis Foundation of America

Contact: Greg Kendall
Gregory.Kendall@va.gov
404-417-5385
Veterans Affairs Research Communications

Public Release: 17-Aug-2016
UA phononics pioneer probes the untapped powers of sound
A founder of phononics, the emerging science of sound, receives $1.8 million from the NSF to bend acoustic waves in nature-defying ways.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Jill Goetz
jgoetz@email.arizona.edu
520-621-1992
University of Arizona College of Engineering

Public Release: 17-Aug-2016
ACS Central Science
New method to identify microscopic failure
The Autonomous Materials Systems Group at the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology has recently found a new way to identify microscopic damage in polymers and composite materials before total failure occurs.
BP International Centre for Advanced Materials

Contact: Maeve Reilly
mjreilly@illinois.edu
217-244-7316
Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology

Public Release: 16-Aug-2016
Small
Down to the wire: ONR researchers and new bacteria
Scientists sponsored by the Office of Naval Research (ONR) have genetically modified a common soil bacteria to create electrical wires that not only conduct electricity, but are thousands of times thinner than a human hair.

Contact: Bob Freeman
onrpublicaffairs@navy.mil
703-696-5031
Office of Naval Research

Public Release: 16-Aug-2016
Energy Department to invest $16 million in computer design of materials
The US Department of Energy announced today that it will invest $16 million over the next four years to accelerate the design of new materials through use of supercomputers. Two four-year projects -- one team led by DOE's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the other team led by DOE's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory -- will take advantage of superfast computers at DOE national laboratories by developing software to design fundamentally new functional materials.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Dawn Levy
levyd@ornl.gov
865-576-6448
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Public Release: 16-Aug-2016
Chemistry - A European Journal
McMaster researchers resolve a problem that has been holding back a technological revolution
Researchers at McMaster University have cleared that obstacle by developing a new way to purify carbon nanotubes -- the smaller, nimbler semiconductors that are expected to replace silicon within computer chips and a wide array of electronics.

Contact: Michelle Donovan
donovam@mcmaster.ca
905-525-9140
McMaster University

Public Release: 15-Aug-2016
Physical Review B
'Sniffer plasmons' could detect explosives
Scientists have proposed a graphene-based spaser that can 'sniff out' a single molecule, which could be used to detect even small amounts of various substances, including explosives.

Contact: Asya Shepunova
shepunova@phystech.edu
Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology

Public Release: 15-Aug-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Researchers discover that DNA naturally fluoresces
The new discovery opens door for staining-free, super-resolution imaging and expands understanding of biology.

Contact: Megan Fellman
fellman@northwestern.edu
847-491-3115
Northwestern University

Showing releases 901-925 out of 1938.

<< < 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 | 37 | 38 | 39 | 40 | 41 > >>