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Features Archive


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30-Nov-2016
Q&A: Simon Bare catalyzes new chemistry effort at SLAC
Simon Bare, who joined the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory in April, spent 30 years as an industrial chemist investigating how catalysts work. Now, as co-director of the Chemistry and Catalysis Division at the lab's Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL), his goal is to build on research strengths at SLAC and Stanford University to create a West Coast center for catalyst research and define new research directions.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

28-Nov-2016
'Brighter than a billion suns': SLAC studies featured in TEDx Talk
Phil Manning and his colleagues have used synchrotron light for nearly a decade to help interpret the chemical signatures locked within fossilized life. Bright X-rays have allowed them to study fossilized worm burrows, recreate pigment patterns in ancient bird feathers, see how Jurassic dinosaur bones heal and image the living chemistry of 50-million year old plant fossils.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

21-Nov-2016
New tabletop technique probes outermost electrons of atoms deep inside solids
Researchers at the Stanford PULSE Institute have invented a new way to probe the valence electrons of atoms deep inside a crystalline solid.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

17-Nov-2016
Photosynthesis: Gathering sunshine with the world's smallest antennas
Scientists are working to better understand the photosynthetic antenna complexes that capture sunlight for plants, algae and bacteria to use.

Contact: Shannon Brescher Shea
shannon.shea@science.doe.gov
DOE/US Department of Energy

15-Nov-2016
After the Nobel Prize, what do you do for an encore?
Brownian motion makes it difficult for scientists to examine single protein molecules. W.E. Moerner, who had previously won the Nobel prize in chemistry, started tackling this issue in 2004. He and his team developed the ABEL Trap, which allows researchers to corral single molecules for study. Since then, scientists have used the trap to study proteins involved in photosynthesis and other major biological systems.

Contact: Kristin Manke
Kristin.Manke@Science.doe.gov
DOE/US Department of Energy

14-Nov-2016
Radiation security team from Sandia works behind the scenes at events to protect public
Richard Stump has been to five Super Bowls and hasn't seen a single pass, run or touchdown. Stump works security -- a very special kind of security -- at large public events. He's a senior scientist on Sandia National Laboratories' Radiological Assistance Program (RAP) team.

Contact: Mollie Rappe
mrappe@sandia.gov
505-844-8220
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

14-Nov-2016
The search for dark matter
Researchers have been attempting to measure dark matter for more than three decades, but have yet to detect a dark matter particle. Through experiments both deep underground like LUX and LUX-ZEPLIN and in space like the AMS, researchers are narrowing the field of search.

Contact: Shannon Brescher Shea
shannon.shea@science.doe.gov
DOE/US Department of Energy

11-Nov-2016
Nanotechnology manager elected president of Materials Research Society
Senior manager Sean Hearne, who leads the Center of Integrated Nanotechnology (CINT) for Sandia National Laboratories, has been elected president of the Materials Research Society. MRS is an international organization that promotes interdisciplinary materials research with 15,000 members from academia, industry and national labs.

Contact: Mollie Rappe
mrappe@sandia.gov
505-844-8220
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

11-Nov-2016
PPPL senior physicist Wei-li Lee honored at week-long symposium
Physicists from around the world gathered at the University of California, Irvine this past summer for a symposium in honor of Wei-li Lee, a senior physicist at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL).

Contact: Raphael Rosen
rrosen@pppl.gov
DOE/Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

9-Nov-2016
Scientists, interns bring structural biology's 'magic bullet' technique to X-ray lasers
To understand the 3-D shape of a protein, scientists often rely on information from similar molecules. But sometimes, the protein is so unique that it's not possible to find a close relative.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

3-Nov-2016
The destructive effects of supercooled liquid water on airplane safety and climate models
Exploring the properties of supercooled liquid water -- the bane of airplane wings and climate theorists -- Sandia Labs is mounting an expedition to fly huge tethered balloons in Alaska this winter, where temperatures descend to 40 degrees below zero and it's dark as a dungeon for all but a few hours of the day.

Contact: neal singer
nsinger@sandia.gov
505-845-7078
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

3-Nov-2016
SLAC, Berkeley Lab researchers prepare for scientific computing on the exascale
Researchers at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory are playing key roles in two recently funded computing projects with the goal of developing cutting-edge scientific applications for future exascale supercomputers that can perform at least a billion billion computing operations per second -- 50 to 100 times more than the most powerful supercomputers in the world today.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

3-Nov-2016
Peering into batteries: X-rays reveal lithium-ion's mysteries
Scientists are using x-rays from the national laboratories' advanced light sources to study the movement and structure of lithium-ion batteries in real time, as the batteries function. This technique led to the development of the cathode used in the Chevrolet Volt and is now being used to further improve our understanding of batteries.

Contact: Shannon Brescher Shea
shannon.shea@science.doe.gov
DOE/US Department of Energy

2-Nov-2016
Sandia to evaluate if computational neuroscientists are on track
The Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA) launched the Machine Intelligence from Cortical Networks (MICrONS) project earlier this year. Sandia National Laboratories is refereeing the work of three university-led teams to map, understand and mathematically re-create visual processing in the brain to close the computer-human gap in object recognition.

Contact: Mollie Rappe
mrappe@sandia.gov
505-844-8220
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

1-Nov-2016
PPPL physicist receives ExxonMobil grant for plasma research
Physicist Egemen Kolemen is sharing a grant from ExxonMobil to research whether plasma could reduce greenhouse gas emissions associated with oil wells.

Contact: Raphael Rosen
rrosen@pppl.gov
DOE/Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

28-Oct-2016
Peek behind the scenes at SLAC's Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource
Engineering teams at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory took advantage of the lull in experiments to make important upgrades during a recent routine beam shutdown at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL). The newly outfitted beamlines will help visiting researchers and SLAC scientists run experiments using the synchrotron's extremely bright X-ray radiation.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

28-Oct-2016
New technique reveals powerful, 'patchy' approach to nanoparticle synthesis
Patches of chain-like molecules placed across nanoscale particles can radically transform the optical, electronic, and magnetic properties of particle-based materials. Now, scientists have used cutting-edge electron tomography techniques -- a process of 3-D reconstructive imaging -- to pinpoint the structure and composition of the polymer nano-patches.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

27-Oct-2016
PPPL physicists win funding to lead a DOE exascale computing project
A proposal from PPPL scientists has been chosen as part of a national initiative to develop the next generation of supercomputers. Known as the Exascale Computing Project, the initiative will include a focus on exascale-related software, applications, and workforce training.

Contact: Raphael Rosen
rrosen@pppl.gov
DOE/Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

19-Oct-2016
Underground science: Berkeley Lab digs deep for clean energy solutions
About a mile beneath the Earth's surface in an old gold mine, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) scientists have built an observatory to study how rocks fracture. The knowledge they gain could ultimately help reduce greenhouse gas emissions and accelerate deployment of clean energy technologies.

Contact: Julie Chao
jhchao@lbl.gov
510-486-6491
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

13-Oct-2016
Scientists gather for Annual SLAC Users' Conference
More than 400 participants came to the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory for the 2016 LCLS/SSRL Annual Users' Meeting and Workshops, held Oct. 5-8.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

12-Oct-2016
X-rays reveal artistry in an ancient vase
Under beams of X-rays, the colors of art become the colors of chemistry. The mysterious blacks, reds and whites of ancient Greek pottery can be read in elements -- iron, potassium, calcium and zinc -- and art history may be rewritten.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

12-Oct-2016
Planetarium show brings 'phantom' matter to life
A new planetarium show is designed to immerse audiences in the search for dark matter, which we have so far detected only through its gravitational effects though it makes up most of the mass of the universe.

Contact: Glenn Roberts Jr.
geroberts@lbl.gov
510-486-5582
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

12-Oct-2016
Former Fermilab researcher Sekazi Mtingwa to share 2017 Wilson Prize
Theoretical physicist Sekazi Mtingwa, a former Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory scientist, will share the 2017 Robert R. Wilson Prize for Achievement in the Physics of Particle Accelerators for groundbreaking theoretical work that helped researchers understand and cope with an important constraint on the intensity and focus of particle beams in accelerators.

Contact: Andre Salles
media@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

12-Oct-2016
Fragment tracking: Insights into what happens in explosions
Thanks to advances in high-speed cameras, imaging techniques and computer modeling, Sandia National Laboratories researchers are studying fragmenting explosives in ways that weren't possible before.

Contact: Sue Holmes
sholmes@sandia.gov
505-844-6362
Doe-Anderson

11-Oct-2016
SLAC Theoretical Physicist James Bjorken to Share 2017 Wilson Prize

Theoretical physicist James D. 'BJ' Bjorken, a professor emeritus at Stanford University and the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, will share the 2017 Robert R. Wilson Prize for Achievement in the Physics of Particle Accelerators for groundbreaking theoretical work that helped researchers understand and cope with an important constraint on the intensity and focus of particle beams in accelerators.


Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

Showing stories 1-25 out of 699 stories.
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