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Features Archive


Showing stories 1-25 out of 809 stories.
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26-Jul-2017
Air Force Fellows aim high at Argonne

Science, technology and national security come together in a personal and powerful way through the US Air Force Fellows program at Argonne National Laboratory, which on July 10 will become a second home to Lt. Col. Chris Snyder and Maj. Sean 'Skeet' Richardson.


Contact: Chel Lancaster
chel@anl.gov
630-252-6138
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

26-Jul-2017
Neutrons peer into a running engine

Oak Ridge national Laboratory researchers and industry partners used neutrons to investigate the performance of a new aluminum alloy in a gasoline-powered engine -- while the engine was running.


Contact: Ashley Huff
huffac@ornl.gov
865-241-6451
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

26-Jul-2017
Long Baseline Neutrino Facility breaks ground

On July 21, one mile beneath Lead, South Dakota, construction began on the first international mega-science experiment ever hosted on US soil.


Contact: Karen McNulty Walsj
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

24-Jul-2017
Construction of massive neutrino experiment kicks off a mile underground

A new era in international particle physics research officially began July 21 with a unique groundbreaking held a mile underground at the Sanford Underground Research Facility in South Dakota. Dignitaries, scientists and engineers from around the world marked the start of construction of a massive international experiment that could change our understanding of the universe. The Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF) will house the international Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE).


Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

18-Jul-2017
Bio-inspired materials: Borrowing from nature's playbook

Nature provides myriad examples of unique materials and structures developed for specialized applications or adaptations. An interdisciplinary group of researchers at the US Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory is trying to unlock the secrets that organisms use to build such complex structures so that power can be used to create materials not found in nature and not capable of being synthesized by conventional means.


Contact: Kerry Gibson
kgibson@ameslab.gov
515-294-1405
DOE/Ames Laboratory

18-Jul-2017
Report: Compact, precise beam could aid in nuclear securityeam Could Aid in Nuclear Security
A Berkeley Lab-led report highlights a new, compact technique for producing beams with precisely controlled energy and direction that could 'see' through thick steel and concrete to more easily detect and identify concealed or smuggled nuclear materials for national security and other applications.

Contact: Glenn Roberts Jr.
geroberts@lbl.gov
510-486-5582
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

17-Jul-2017
No assembly required: Nanoparticles that put themselves together
Scientists may be able to use self-assembly to design new materials with custom characteristics. Understanding self-assembly is particularly important for working with nanoparticles. Scientists supported by the Department of Energy are investigating two major methods of self-assembly. They are looking into both particles that assemble on their own as well as 'nano-Velcro' that can pull together particles that wouldn't otherwise connect on their own.

Contact: Shannon Brescher Shea
shannon.shea@science.doe.gov
DOE/US Department of Energy

12-Jul-2017
Tackling disease in three dimensions: Supercomputers help decode RNA structure
In collaboration with staff from the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility, researchers at the National Cancer Institute have perfected a technique that accurately computes the 3-D structure of RNA sequences. This method, which relies on a computer program known as RS3D and supercomputer Mira gives researchers studying cancer and other diseases structural insights about associated RNAs that can be used to advance computer-assisted drug design and development.

Contact: Brian Grabowski
bgrabowski@anl.gov
630-252-1232
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

11-Jul-2017
Scientists see molecules 'breathe' in remarkable detail

In a milestone for studying a class of chemical reactions relevant to novel solar cells and memory storage devices, an international team of researchers working at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory used an X-ray laser to watch 'molecular breathing' -- waves of subtle in-and-out motions of atoms -- in real time and unprecedented detail.


Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

6-Jul-2017
ORNL researchers apply imaging, computational expertise to St. Jude research
In the quest to better understand and cure childhood diseases, scientists at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital accumulate enormous amounts of data from powerful video microscopes. To help St. Jude scientists mine that trove of data, researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory have created custom algorithms that can provide a deeper understanding of the images and quicken the pace of research.

Contact: Stephanie Seay
seaysg@ornl.gov
865-576-9894
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

5-Jul-2017
SLAC's electron hub gets new 'metro map' for world's most powerful X-ray laser
The central hub for powerful electron beams at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory is getting a makeover to prepare for the installation of LCLS-II -- a major upgrade to the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), the world's first hard X-ray free-electron laser.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

5-Jul-2017
Will brain-inspired chips make a dent in science's big data problems?
Although neuromorphic computing is still in its infancy, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) researchers hope that these tiny, low-power, brain-inspired computing systems could one day help alleviate some of science's big data challenges. With funding from the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program, two groups of researchers are exploring how science might benefit from this new technology.

Contact: Linda Vu
lvu@lbl.gov
510-495-2402
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

30-Jun-2017
Ecological roots
Despite popular conceptions as an offshoot of the environmental movement, much of the field of ecology evolved to meet the needs of the federal government during the Atomic Age. The Department of Energy's national laboratories played a key role, from developing fundamental theories to computer models. The contributions from the institutions that became Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory still influence the field today.

Contact: Shannon Brescher Shea
shannon.shea@science.doe.gov
DOE/US Department of Energy

27-Jun-2017
Yi Cui named Blavatnik National Laureate
Pioneering nanoscientist Yi Cui, professor of materials science and engineering at Stanford University and of photon science at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, has been named a 2017 Blavatnik National Laureate. The $250,000 award recognizes the most promising researchers age 42 and younger at top US academic and research institutions.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

23-Jun-2017
World's biggest neutrino experiment moves one step closer
On June 21, a prototype detector at CERN for the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment recorded its first particle tracks. So begins the largest ever test of an extremely precise method for measuring elusive particles called neutrinos, which may hold the key to why our universe looks the way it does and how it came into being.

Contact: Andre Salles
media@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

22-Jun-2017
Our expanding universe: Delving into dark energy
The universe is stretching out ever more rapidly -- a phenomena known as cosmic acceleration -- and scientists don't know why. Understanding the "dark energy" that is causing this expansion would help them put together a clearer picture of the universe's history. Scientists supported by the Department of Energy's Office of Science are using massive telescopes to chart how dark energy has influenced the structure of the universe over time.

Contact: Shannon Brescher Shea
shannon.shea@science.doe.gov
DOE/US Department of Energy

22-Jun-2017
How a single chemical bond balances cells between life and death
With SLAC's X-ray laser and synchrotron, scientists measured exactly how much energy goes into keeping a crucial chemical bond from triggering a death spiral for cells.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

22-Jun-2017
A single electron's tiny leap sets off 'molecular sunscreen' response
In experiments at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, scientists were able to see the first step of a process that protects a DNA building block called thymine from sun damage: When it's hit with ultraviolet light, a single electron jumps into a slightly higher orbit around the nucleus of a single oxygen atom.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

21-Jun-2017
Upgrades at Sandia Lab's Tonopah Test Range help weapons testing
It's been a challenge for Sandia National Laboratories' Tonopah Test Range to keep decades-old equipment running while gathering detailed information required for 21st century non-nuclear testing. Over the past several years, the Nevada range changed the analog brains in instruments to digital, moved to modern communications systems and upgraded telemetry and tracking equipment and computing systems.

Contact: Sue Holmes
sholmes@sandia.gov
505-844-6362
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

20-Jun-2017
Chicago Quantum Exchange to create technologically transformative ecosystem
The University of Chicago is collaborating with the US Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory and Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory to launch an intellectual hub for advancing academic, industrial and governmental efforts in the science and engineering of quantum information.

Contact: Andre Salles
media@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

20-Jun-2017
New prototypes for superconducting undulators show promise for more powerful, versatile X-ray beams
Researchers at the US Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) and Argonne National Laboratory have collaborated to design, build and test two devices that utilize different superconducting materials and could make X-ray lasers more powerful, versatile, compact and durable.

Contact: Karen Mellen
kmellen@anl.gov
630-252-5325
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

20-Jun-2017
R&D effort produces magnetic devices to enable more powerful X-ray lasers
Team of researchers at Berkeley and Argonne national labs have designed, built, and tested two magnetic devices that could make X-ray lasers more powerful, versatile, compact, and durable.

Contact: Glenn Roberts Jr.
geroberts@lbl.gov
510-486-5582
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

20-Jun-2017
SLAC experiment is first to decipher atomic structure of an intact virus with an X-ray laser
An international team of scientists has for the first time used an X-ray free-electron laser to unravel the structure of an intact virus particle on the atomic level. The method dramatically reduces the amount of virus material required, while also allowing the investigations to be carried out several times faster than before. This opens up entirely new research opportunities.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

16-Jun-2017
With ARM instruments watching, an extensive summer melt in west Antarctica
One day in December of 2015, bound for a remote ice camp in the interior of Antarctica, Scripps Institution of Oceanography doctoral student Ryan Scott boarded a ski-equipped LC-130 turboprop transport plane at McMurdo Station at the south tip of Ross Island. It was austral summer and the temperature outside hovered around -4 degrees Celsius.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

15-Jun-2017
How to build software for a computer 50 times faster than anything in the world
Researchers at Argonne are working to create new and adapt existing software technologies to operate at exascale by overcoming challenges found in several key areas, such as resiliency, data reduction, software libraries and the management of memory, power and computational resources.

Contact: Brian Grabowski
bgrabowski@anl.gov
630-252-1232
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Showing stories 1-25 out of 809 stories.
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