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Features Archive


Showing stories 26-50 out of 206 stories.
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17-Apr-2017
How do you make a femtosecond light source?
Agostino 'Ago' Marinelli first met pioneering accelerator physicist Claudio Pellegrini as an undergraduate student at the University of Rome. It was 2007, a couple of years before the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) came online at SLAC, and people were abuzz about free-electron laser physics.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

17-Apr-2017
Why study in femtoseconds?
The text on this screen may appear stable enough, but every molecule, atom, and electron in it is in constant motion. The laws of quantum physics require that on the atomic scale nothing is ever truly at rest. Nano-sized motion also keeps us warm, cooks our food, lights our smartphones, and enables all of our senses of hearing, sight, smell, taste, and touch.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
510-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

13-Apr-2017
SLAC celebrates Femtosecond Week
Got a millionth of a billionth of a second? There's science that actually happens on this timescale. Join us online for a week of ultrafast science from April 17 to 21. Learn more about how scientists and engineers use electron beams and bright pulses of light from the Linac Coherent Light Source X-ray laser and other advanced lasers to capture some of nature's speediest processes that occur in just femtoseconds, or quadrillionths of a second.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

11-Apr-2017
New SLAC theory institute aims to speed research on exotic materials at light sources
A new institute at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory is using the power of theory to search for new types of materials that could revolutionize society -- by making it possible, for instance, to transmit electricity over power lines with no loss.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

7-Apr-2017
Scientists watch a molecule protect itself from radiation damage
When DNA is hit with ultraviolet light, it can lose excess energy from radiation by ejecting the core of a hydrogen atom -- a single proton -- to keep other chemical bonds in the system from breaking. To gain insight into this process, researchers used X-ray laser pulses from the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory to investigate how energy from light transforms a relatively simple molecule, 2-thiopyridone.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

31-Mar-2017
New device produces hydrogen peroxide for water purification

Producing and distributing hydrogen peroxide is a challenge in many parts of the world. Now scientists at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and Stanford University have created a small device for hydrogen peroxide production that could be powered by renewable energy sources, like conventional solar panels.


Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.ed
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

16-Mar-2017
Three SLAC employees awarded lab's highest honor

At a March 7 ceremony, three employees of the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory were awarded the lab's highest honor -- the SLAC Director's Award.


Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

1-Mar-2017
Corrective 'eyeglasses' now available for X-ray research facilities
A research collaboration designed and built special spectacles, or corrective phase plates, for use at light sources that use high-intensity X-rays to probe matter in fine detail. Nature Communications published the details of the method, developed in part by researchers at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

27-Feb-2017
New droplet-on-tape method assists biochemical research at X-ray lasers
Scientists at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Brookhaven National Laboratory, and other institutes designed a new assembly-line system that rapidly replaces exposed biological samples by moving droplets along a miniature conveyor belt, timed to coincide with the arrival of the X-ray pulses. The droplet-on-tape system now allows the team to study the biochemical reactions in real-time from microseconds to seconds, revealing the stages of these complex reactions.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

23-Feb-2017
Harker School wins 2017 SLAC Regional Science Bowl competition
After losing its first match of the day to the defending champions, The Harker School's team won 10 consecutive rounds to claim victory in the annual SLAC Regional DOE Science Bowl on Saturday, Feb. 11.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

16-Feb-2017
Protein structure solved from smallest crystals yet
An international team of scientists used an X-ray laser at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory to determine the structure of an insect virus's crystalline protein 'cocoon.'

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

2-Feb-2017
SLAC study helps explain why uranium persists in groundwater at former mining sites
A recent study led by scientists at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory helps describe how uranium cycles through the environment at former uranium mining sites and why it can be difficult to remove.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

31-Jan-2017
Taking down a giant: 699 tons of SLAC's accelerator removed for upgrade
For the first time in more than 50 years, a door that is opened at the western end of the historic linear accelerator at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory casts light on four empty walls stretching as far as the eye can see. This end of the linac -- a full kilometer of it -- has been stripped of all its equipment both above and below ground.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

11-Jan-2017
Sketching out magnetism with electricity
In a proof-of-concept study published in Nature Physics, researchers drew magnetic squares in a nonmagnetic material with an electrified pen and then 'read' this magnetic doodle with X-rays.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

4-Jan-2017
SLAC study: Light can switch on topological materials
Theoretical physicists at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory used computer simulations to show how special light pulses could create robust channels where electricity flows without resistance in an atomically thin semiconductor.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

30-Nov-2016
Q&A: Simon Bare catalyzes new chemistry effort at SLAC
Simon Bare, who joined the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory in April, spent 30 years as an industrial chemist investigating how catalysts work. Now, as co-director of the Chemistry and Catalysis Division at the lab's Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL), his goal is to build on research strengths at SLAC and Stanford University to create a West Coast center for catalyst research and define new research directions.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

28-Nov-2016
'Brighter than a billion suns': SLAC studies featured in TEDx Talk
Phil Manning and his colleagues have used synchrotron light for nearly a decade to help interpret the chemical signatures locked within fossilized life. Bright X-rays have allowed them to study fossilized worm burrows, recreate pigment patterns in ancient bird feathers, see how Jurassic dinosaur bones heal and image the living chemistry of 50-million year old plant fossils.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

21-Nov-2016
New tabletop technique probes outermost electrons of atoms deep inside solids
Researchers at the Stanford PULSE Institute have invented a new way to probe the valence electrons of atoms deep inside a crystalline solid.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

9-Nov-2016
Scientists, interns bring structural biology's 'magic bullet' technique to X-ray lasers
To understand the 3-D shape of a protein, scientists often rely on information from similar molecules. But sometimes, the protein is so unique that it's not possible to find a close relative.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

3-Nov-2016
SLAC, Berkeley Lab researchers prepare for scientific computing on the exascale
Researchers at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory are playing key roles in two recently funded computing projects with the goal of developing cutting-edge scientific applications for future exascale supercomputers that can perform at least a billion billion computing operations per second -- 50 to 100 times more than the most powerful supercomputers in the world today.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

28-Oct-2016
Peek behind the scenes at SLAC's Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource
Engineering teams at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory took advantage of the lull in experiments to make important upgrades during a recent routine beam shutdown at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL). The newly outfitted beamlines will help visiting researchers and SLAC scientists run experiments using the synchrotron's extremely bright X-ray radiation.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

13-Oct-2016
Scientists gather for Annual SLAC Users' Conference
More than 400 participants came to the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory for the 2016 LCLS/SSRL Annual Users' Meeting and Workshops, held Oct. 5-8.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

12-Oct-2016
X-rays reveal artistry in an ancient vase
Under beams of X-rays, the colors of art become the colors of chemistry. The mysterious blacks, reds and whites of ancient Greek pottery can be read in elements -- iron, potassium, calcium and zinc -- and art history may be rewritten.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

11-Oct-2016
SLAC Theoretical Physicist James Bjorken to Share 2017 Wilson Prize

Theoretical physicist James D. 'BJ' Bjorken, a professor emeritus at Stanford University and the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, will share the 2017 Robert R. Wilson Prize for Achievement in the Physics of Particle Accelerators for groundbreaking theoretical work that helped researchers understand and cope with an important constraint on the intensity and focus of particle beams in accelerators.


Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

7-Oct-2016
Q&A: SLAC cosmology research featured in Terrence Malick's 'Voyage of Time'
Terrence Malick's science documentary 'Voyage of Time' features two scenes contributed by visualization expert Ralf Kaehler and astrophysicist Tom Abel from the Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology (KIPAC), a joint institute of Stanford University and the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

Showing stories 26-50 out of 206 stories.
<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 > >>


 

 

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