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Features Archive


Showing stories 151-175 out of 892 stories.
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21-Apr-2017
What can you study in femtoseconds? Materials
When Aaron Lindenberg was introduced to ultrafast science as a first-year grad student at UC Berkeley, he was immediately hooked. He knew he wanted to be part of a hot research field that explores nature's speediest processes and lets us see the world with different eyes.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

20-Apr-2017
What can you study in femtoseconds? High energy density physics
It might be difficult to imagine a job that spans understanding the cosmos, bringing fusion energy to Earth, and treating cancer, but that's exactly what Siegfried Glenzer does.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

20-Apr-2017
What can you study in femtoseconds? Biology & chemistry
It all started when a high school chemistry teacher encouraged Amy Cordones-Hahn to leapfrog her regular classroom assignments and do experiments in his lab.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

18-Apr-2017
How do you catch femtosecond light?
Gabriella Carini enjoys those little moments -- after hours and hours of testing in clean rooms, labs and at X-ray beamlines -- when she first sees an instrument work.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

17-Apr-2017
How do you make a femtosecond light source?
Agostino 'Ago' Marinelli first met pioneering accelerator physicist Claudio Pellegrini as an undergraduate student at the University of Rome. It was 2007, a couple of years before the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) came online at SLAC, and people were abuzz about free-electron laser physics.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

17-Apr-2017
Why study in femtoseconds?
The text on this screen may appear stable enough, but every molecule, atom, and electron in it is in constant motion. The laws of quantum physics require that on the atomic scale nothing is ever truly at rest. Nano-sized motion also keeps us warm, cooks our food, lights our smartphones, and enables all of our senses of hearing, sight, smell, taste, and touch.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
510-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

17-Apr-2017
How X-rays pushed topological matter research over the top
Pioneering X-ray experiments at Berkeley Lab's Advanced Light Source (ALS) helped bring to life decades-old theories about exotic topological states of matter, and the ALS continues to play an important role in this flourishing field of research.

Contact: Glenn Roberts Jr.
geroberts@lbl.gov
510-486-5582
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

14-Apr-2017
2017 Cyber Defense Competition enthralls crowd at Argonne
Argonne's second annual Cyber Defense Competition kept spectators on the edge of their seat. New dynamics added suspense to this daylong educational event for college and high school students.

Contact: Justin Breaux
jbreaux@anl.gov
630-252-5274
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

13-Apr-2017
SLAC celebrates Femtosecond Week
Got a millionth of a billionth of a second? There's science that actually happens on this timescale. Join us online for a week of ultrafast science from April 17 to 21. Learn more about how scientists and engineers use electron beams and bright pulses of light from the Linac Coherent Light Source X-ray laser and other advanced lasers to capture some of nature's speediest processes that occur in just femtoseconds, or quadrillionths of a second.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

13-Apr-2017
Brookhaven Lab-led research aims to develop protections against chemical warfare agents
Scientists at Brookhaven National Laboratory are participating in a collaborative effort to study how the use of zirconium-based metal organic frameworks and niobium-based polyoxometalates may be effectively used in gas masks to capture and decompose dangerous chemical agents like Sarin.

Contact: Kay Cordtz
kcordtz@bnl.gov
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

11-Apr-2017
New SLAC theory institute aims to speed research on exotic materials at light sources
A new institute at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory is using the power of theory to search for new types of materials that could revolutionize society -- by making it possible, for instance, to transmit electricity over power lines with no loss.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

7-Apr-2017
Scientists watch a molecule protect itself from radiation damage
When DNA is hit with ultraviolet light, it can lose excess energy from radiation by ejecting the core of a hydrogen atom -- a single proton -- to keep other chemical bonds in the system from breaking. To gain insight into this process, researchers used X-ray laser pulses from the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory to investigate how energy from light transforms a relatively simple molecule, 2-thiopyridone.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

5-Apr-2017
Skyrmions created with a special spiral
Researchers at Argonne have found a way to control the creation of special textured surfaces, called skyrmions, in magnetically ordered materials.

Contact: Jared Sagoff
jsagoff@anl.gov
630-252-5549
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

5-Apr-2017
High-schooler solves college-level security puzzle from Argonne, sparks interest in career
15-year-old Jocelyn Murray and her classmates solved a series of college-level cyber puzzles. This weekend they had a front row seat to watch college-level competitors who are older and more experienced defend their networks from constant attack.

Contact: Justin Breaux
jbreaux@anl.gov
630-252-5274
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

3-Apr-2017
How did the proton get its spin?
Scientists once thought proton spin was simple to understand. However, after experiments in the 1980s proved their ideas wrong, researchers have been working to understand how the proton's components contribute to its spin. Scientists use the unique capabilities of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility, both DOE Office of Science user facilities, to explore this fundamental phenomenon.

Contact: Shannon Brescher Shea
shannon.shea@science.doe.gov
DOE/US Department of Energy

31-Mar-2017
New device produces hydrogen peroxide for water purification

Producing and distributing hydrogen peroxide is a challenge in many parts of the world. Now scientists at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and Stanford University have created a small device for hydrogen peroxide production that could be powered by renewable energy sources, like conventional solar panels.


Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.ed
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

30-Mar-2017
Physicists move closer to listening in on sub-atomic conversation
Much like two friendly neighbors getting together to chat over a cup of coffee, the minuscule particles in our sub-atomic world also come together to engage in a kind of conversation. Now, nuclear scientists are developing tools to allow them to listen in on the particles' gab fests and learn more about how they stick together to build our visible universe. The first complex calculations of a particle called the sigma have been carried out and published in Physical Review Letters.

Contact: Kandice Carter
kcarter@jlab.org
757-269-7263
DOE/Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

28-Mar-2017
Two Brookhaven Lab physicists named 2016 American Physical Society Fellows
The American Physical Society (APS) has elected two scientists from the US Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory as 2016 APS Fellows, an honor bestowed once a year to a fraction of a percentage of the society's members.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

28-Mar-2017
Investigating the benefits of cooperation
Stony Brook grad student Tiffany Victor uses infrared light to explore how fungal associations help plants thrive.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
Doe-Anderson

28-Mar-2017
Brookhaven scientists named Innovators of the Year
Evgeny Nazaretski and Yong Chu, physicists at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Brookhaven National Lab, have been recognized by Innovate Long Island as Innovators of the Year for leading the development of the multilayer Laue lens microscope.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
Doe-Anderson

28-Mar-2017
Brookhaven Lab's Bjoern Schenke receives Zimányi Medal
Bjoern Schenke, a theoretical physicist at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory, has been awarded the 2017 Zimányi Medal in Nuclear Theory.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

28-Mar-2017
Great Neck South High School wins Regional Science Bowl at Brookhaven Lab
Great Neck South High School took first place in the Brookhaven National Laboratory/Long Island Regional High School Science Bowl held at the Lab on Saturday, Jan. 28.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

28-Mar-2017
Secrets to scientific success: Planning and coordination
Very often there are people behind the scenes of scientific advances, quietly organizing the project's logistics. New facilities and big collaborations require people to create schedules, manage resources, and communicate among teams. The US Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory is lucky to have Xiaofeng Guo in its ranks -- a skilled project manager who coordinates projects reaching across the US and around the world.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

27-Mar-2017
The power of 1
When it comes to creating new materials, single crystals play an important role in presenting a clearer picture of a material's intrinsic properties. A typical material will be comprised of lots of smaller crystals and the grain boundaries between these crystals can act as impediments, affecting properties such as electrical or thermal resistance.

Contact: Laura Millsaps
millsaps@ameslab.gov
515-294-3474
DOE/Ames Laboratory

27-Mar-2017
Valerie Taylor named Argonne's Mathematics and Computer Science division director
Computer scientist Valerie Taylor has been appointed as the next director of the Mathematics and Computer Science division at Argonne, effective July 3, 2017.

Contact: Brian Grabowski
bgrabowski@anl.gov
630-252-1232
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Showing stories 151-175 out of 892 stories.
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