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US Department of Energy National Science Bowl


 

Features Archive


Showing stories 201-225 out of 699 stories.
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8-Oct-2015
Los Alamos-led consortium works to enhance fuel cell technology
Los Alamos National Laboratory is leading a Department of Energy- Fuel Cells Technologies Office-funded project to enhance the performance and durability of polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells, while simultaneously reducing their cost.

Contact: Nancy Ambrosiano
nwa@lanl.gov
505-667-0471
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

7-Oct-2015
Laser spectroscopy of ultrathin semiconductor reveals rise of 'trion' quasiparticles
Scientists at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory used ultrafast laser spectroscopy at the Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences to demystify the dynamics of the negative trions. They explored the behavior of the charged quasiparticle in a two-dimensional semiconductor that is an excellent absorber of sunlight. Their insights, published in the journal Physical Review B, may prove important for advancing technologies for solar energy and quantum computing.

Contact: Dawn Levy
levyd@ornl.gov
865-576-6448
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

7-Oct-2015
Veljko Radeka shares inaugural APS Division of Particles and Fields Instrumentation Award
The inaugural American Physical Society (APS) Division of Particles and Fields Instrumentation Award has been presented jointly to David Nygren of the University of Texas at Arlington and Veljko Radeka of the US Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory. Nygren and Radeka received the award during the APS 'New Technologies for Discovery' Workshop on Oct. 5, 2015, at the University of Texas at Arlington.

Contact: Peter Genzer
genzer@bnl.gov
631-344-3174
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

7-Oct-2015
Brookhaven Lab's links to 2015 Nobel Prize in Physics
The US Department of Energy's (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory joins in the worldwide celebration of physicists Takaaki Kajita and Arthur B. McDonald, who were awarded the 2015 Nobel Prize in physics for their roles in demonstrating the 'flavor-changing' property of neutrinos. Brookhaven Lab scientists made important contributions to both of these neutrino experiments, fueled by the Lab's legacy in the study of these abundant yet elusive subatomic particles.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

5-Oct-2015
200-terawatt laser brings new extremes in heat, pressure to X-ray experiments
A newly upgraded high-power laser at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory will blaze new trails across many fields of science by recreating the universe's most extreme conditions, such as those at the heart of stars and planets, in a lab.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

5-Oct-2015
DOE announces funding for new center for computational materials sciences at Brookhaven Lab
The US Department of Energy (DOE) has announced $12 million in funding over the next four years for a new Center for Computational Design of Functional Strongly Correlated Materials and Theoretical Spectroscopy at Brookhaven National Laboratory and Rutgers University. Center scientists will develop next-generation methods and software to accurately describe electronic properties in complex strongly correlated materials, as well as a companion database to predict targeted properties with energy-related application to thermoelectric materials.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

1-Oct-2015
Three questions with: Ames Laboratory cybersecurity manager and researcher Chris Strasburg
Ames Laboratory's Chris Strasburg discovered an interest in research while working in systems support and cybersecurity. He's now Ames Laboratory's cybersecurity manager and working toward a Ph.D. in computer science at Iowa State University, studying artificial intelligence approaches, automation of computer languages, and network security.

Contact: Breehan Gerleman Lucchesi
breehan@ameslab.gov
515-294-9750
DOE/Ames Laboratory

1-Oct-2015
Ames Laboratory scientists create an all-organic UV on-chip spectrometer
The US Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory has developed a near ultra-violet and all-organic light emitting diode that can be used as an on-chip photosensor.

Contact: Laura Millsaps
millsaps@ameslab.gov
515-294-9750
DOE/Ames Laboratory

30-Sep-2015
ORNL microscopy finds evidence of high-temperature superconductivity in single layer
Electron microscopy at is pointing researchers closer to the development of ultra-thin materials that transfer electrons with no resistance at relatively high temperatures.

Contact: Morgan McCorkle
mccorkleml@ornl.gov
865-574-7308
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

29-Sep-2015
Titan helps unpuzzle decades-old plutonium perplexities
First produced in 1940, plutonium is one of the most electronically complicated elements on Earth -- and because of its complexities, scientists have been struggling to prove the existence of its magnetic properties ever since. Finally, that struggle is over, thanks to a timely combination of theory, algorithm and code developments, neutrons experiments, and Titan -- the second-most-powerful supercomputer in the world.

Contact: Jeremy Rumsey
rumseyjp@ornl.gov
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

29-Sep-2015
Building champions: National Science Bowl offseason
Five-time National Science Bowl champion Mira Loma HS keeps an intense -- and pizza fueled -- training regimen through the summer and fall.

Contact: Ethan Alpern
ethan.alpern@science.doe.gov
202-586-4307
DOE/Office of Scientific and Technical Information

25-Sep-2015
Feng Lin wins Spicer Award for smart window, battery research
Feng Lin, a former postdoctoral researcher at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, has been selected to receive the annual William E. and Diane M. Spicer Young Investigator Award for X-ray experiments at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory that led to new approaches in the design of energy-efficient, color-changing 'smart' windows and high-capacity lithium-ion batteries.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

24-Sep-2015
Los Alamos explores hybrid ultrasmall gold nanocluster for enzymatic fuel cells
With fossil-fuel sources dwindling, better biofuel cell design is a strong candidate in the energy field. In research published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society, Los Alamos researchers and external collaborators synthesized and characterized a new DNA-templated gold nanocluster (AuNC) that could resolve a critical methodological barrier for efficient biofuel cell design.

Contact: Nancy Ambrosiano
nwa@lanl.gov
505-667-0471
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

23-Sep-2015
Techniques could create better material, design in high-consequence uses
Sandia National Laboratories is studying additive manufacturing and its potential for high-consequence applications. Two aspects of that effort are to understand both the properties of newly formed materials and how to design to get just what's needed without over-designing.

Contact: Sue Holmes
sholmes@sandia.gov
505-844-6362
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

23-Sep-2015
Mysterious neutrinos take the stage at SLAC
To find out more about the elusive particles and their potential links to cosmic evolution, invisible dark matter and matter's dominance over antimatter in the universe, the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory is taking on key roles in four neutrino experiments: EXO, DUNE, MicroBooNE and ICARUS.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

23-Sep-2015
Muon g-2 magnet successfully cooled down and powered up
Two years ago, scientists on the Muon g-2 experiment successfully brought a fragile, expensive and complex 17-ton electromagnet on a 3,200-mile land and sea trek from Brookhaven National Laboratory in New York to Fermilab in Illinois. This week, the ring -- now installed in a new, specially designed building at Fermilab -- was successfully cooled down to operating temperature (minus 450 degrees Fahrenheit) and powered up, proving that even after a decade of inactivity, it remains a vital and viable scientific instrument.

Contact: Andre Salles
media@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
Doe-Anderson

17-Sep-2015
Roopali Kukreja wins 2015 Klein Award for X-ray work
Roopali Kukreja, a former researcher at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory who received her Ph.D. in materials science at Stanford University last year, will be honored during a SLAC conference next month with the Melvin P. Klein Scientific Development Award for her X-ray studies of nanoscale magnetic and electrical properties of materials.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

16-Sep-2015
Q&A: Biologist describes milestone in watching proteins boogie
Using an X-ray laser at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, researchers have for the first time directly seen myoglobin move within quadrillionths of a second after a bond breaks and the protein releases a gas molecule. The Linac Coherent Light Source X-ray laser is a DOE Office of Science User Facility, and its short, bright pulses were essential for observing these ultrafast, atomic-scale motions.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

14-Sep-2015
Scientists use lasers to simulate shock effects of meteorite impact on silica
Scientists used high-power laser beams at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory to simulate the shock effects of a meteorite impact in silica, one of the most abundant materials in the Earth's crust. They observed, for the first time, its shockingly fast transformation into the mineral stishovite -- a rare, extremely hard and dense form of silica.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

8-Sep-2015
Making the most from carbon in plants
Researchers are looking for more effective ways to get at all the carbon in biomass to create more energy and biochemicals. However, a lot of the carbon is in lignin -- support tissues in plants, which makes up about a third of the biomass. International teams of scientists are utilizing EMSL's expertise and capabilities to better understand how lignin can be efficiently deconstructed to release its carbon for a more renewable and sustainable energy future.

Contact: Mary Beckman
mary.beckman@pnnl.gov
509-375-3688
DOE/Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory

4-Sep-2015
Fortifying computer chips for space travel
One of the most long-lived and active space-chip testing programs is at the Berkeley Lab. Since 1979, most American satellites and many major NASA projects including the Mars Rover Curiosity, the space shuttles, and the new Orion capsule, have had one or more electronic components go through Berkeley Lab's cyclotron.

Contact: Jon Weiner
jrweiner@lbl.gov
510-486-4014
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

3-Sep-2015
Researchers see 'spin current' in motion for the first time
Researchers at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory have for the first time seen a spin current -- an inherent magnetic property common to all electrons -- as it travels across materials. The result, which revealed a surprising loss of current along the way, is an important step toward realizing a next-generation breed of electronics known as 'spintronics.'

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

1-Sep-2015
Time-lapse analysis offers new look at how cells repair DNA damage
Time-lapse imaging can make complicated processes easier to grasp. Berkeley Lab scientists are using a similar approach to study how cells repair DNA damage. Microscopy images are acquired about every thirty minutes over a span of up to two days, and the resulting sequence of images shows ever-changing hotspots inside cells where DNA is under repair.

Contact: Dan Krotz
dakrotz@lbl.gov
510-486-4019
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

1-Sep-2015
Global team seeks individual X-ray portraits of active viruses, bacteria and cell components
A major international collaboration launched by the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory is laying the technical groundwork for taking individual, atomic-scale portraits of intact viruses, living bacteria and other microscopic samples using the brightest X-ray light on Earth.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

31-Aug-2015
Q&A: Researchers explain a strange high-intensity result at SLAC's X-ray laser
At extremely high intensities, X-rays stop behaving like the ones in your doctor's office and begin interacting with matter in very different ways. This 'nonlinear' X-ray behavior can only be seen at X-ray free-electron lasers. Recent experiments at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory have revealed a new, unexpected twist in that behavior that may be one for the textbooks and could change the way these powerful lasers probe matter.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

Showing stories 201-225 out of 699 stories.
<< < 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 > >>


 

 

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