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Showing stories 701-725 out of 741 stories.
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20-Sep-2007
Jefferson Lab engineer among nation's best
For years, Jefferson Lab has considered Celia Garcia Whitlatch to be one of its most brilliant engineers. Now, others across the country agree.

Contact: Dean Golembeski
deang@jlab.org
757-269-7689
DOE/Ames Laboratory

14-Aug-2007
Using generalized particle distributions: Research collaboration seeks 3-D image of the proton
A computed tomography -- CT -- scan can help physicians pinpoint minute cancer tumors, diagnose tiny broken bones and spot the early signs of osteoporosis. Now physicists are using the principles behind the procedure to peer at the inner workings of the proton. In a recent experiment, members of Jefferson Lab's Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering collaboration found that it will be possible to construct three-dimensional images of the building blocks of the proton.

Contact: Kandice Carter
kcarter@jlab.org
757-269-7263
DOE/Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

14-Aug-2007
Studying the universe through pions
Pions are some of matter's simplest particles. They're built from the same building blocks as protons and neutrons -- quarks. The pion is the simplest particle built of quarks. The quarks are "glued" together by the strong force -- a fundamental force of nature that also binds quarks to form protons and neutrons. Studying the simple pion and its properties can reveal information about matter in the universe, where it came from and how it's held together.

Contact: Kandice Carter
kcarter@jlab.org
757-269-7263
DOE/Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

7-Aug-2007
Scientists study how the strong force builds the lightest particle made of quarks -- the pion
In Jefferson Lab's Hall C, an international collaboration of nuclear physicists, the Fpi collaboration, is studying how the strong force combines nature's fundamental building blocks into the lightest particle built of quarks -- the pion.

Contact: Kandice Carter
kcarter@jlab.org
757-269-7263
DOE/Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

31-Jul-2007
Reaching new heights in accelerator technology
The International Linear Collider is designed to collide high-energy electrons with high-energy positrons (electrons' antimatter counterparts). Once built, the ILC will serve as a powerful tool for scientists to address many of the most compelling questions of the 21st century -- regarding the fundamental nature of matter, energy, space and time, dark matter, dark energy and extra dimensions.

Contact: Kandice Carter
kcarter@jlab.org
757-269-7263
DOE/Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

31-Jul-2007
Exploring the universal glue
In Jefferson Lab's Hall C, an international collaboration of nuclear physicists, the Fpi collaboration, is studying how the strong force combines nature's fundamental building blocks into the lightest particle built of quarks: the pion.

Contact: Kandice Carter
kcarter@jlab.org
757-269-7263
DOE/Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

19-Jul-2007
Researchers' hottest new laser beams 14.2kW
On Oct. 26, Free-Electron Laser (FEL) team members knew they were within reach of a goal they'd pursued for two years. They were aiming to produce 10 kW of laser light at an infrared wavelength of 1.61 microns. On that day, they blew past the milestone to produce 11.7 kW. Just four days later, on Oct. 30, they coaxed another two kW out of the machine setting the record even higher at 14.2 kW.

Contact: Kandice Carter
kcarter@jlab.org
757-269-7263
DOE/Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

9-Jul-2007
Lab enhances scientific data sharing with cutting-edge connection
In early 2005, researchers affiliated with Hall B wanted to transfer raw data from a recent experiment from the tape silo to computers offsite -- a task that without interruption would have taken the Lab's existing network connection almost seven days. Jefferson Lab's newly upgraded network connection is able to transfer data at a rate of up to 10 Gigabits per second, so that same transfer can now be completed in just 2.5 hours.

Contact: Kandice Carter
kcarter@jlab.org
757-269-7263
DOE/Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

5-Jul-2007
Innovative energy-saving process earns Jefferson Lab Team a 2007 White House Award
A series of innovative energy-saving processes invented by engineers at the US Department of Energy's Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility today were celebrated with a prestigious White House Closing the Circle Award during ceremonies in Washington, DC.

Contact: Kandice Carter
kcarter@jlab.org
757-269-7263
DOE/Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

5-Jul-2007
Big bite is reborn
At Jefferson Lab's recent Users Meeting, DOE's Dennis Kovar and NSF's Brad Keister emphasized the funding agencies' commitment to pursuing a cohesive nuclear physics research program in the United States. For instance, Jefferson Lab is funded by DOE; however, NSF provides for many of the Lab's Users and students and some of the instrumentation used in experiments, such as the recently upgraded BigBite spectrometer.

Contact: Kandice Carter
kcarter@jlab.org
757-269-7263
DOE/Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

15-Jun-2007
Surplus electricity could 'fill up' plug-in vehicles
Plug in your car. Unplug foreign oil, greenhouse gases and other emissions that contribute to urban smog.

Contact: Lisa Teke
lisa.teske@pnl.gov
509-372-6850
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

15-Jun-2007
Brain 3D mapping to combat neurodegenerative disease
Wanda felt a jolt of frustration run through her when her husband forgot to meet her at the clubhouse after their round of golf. How many times had this happened lately? It was becoming an embarrassment.

Contact: Lisa Teske
lisa.teske@pnl.gov
509-372-6850
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

15-Jun-2007
Discovering the details of dissolution
Ions in a liquid are like celebrities at a movie opening -- surrounded by fans who jostle each other to get as close as the velvet ropes around the red carpet will allow. So it is with ions in water or other liquids or solvents.

Contact: Lisa Teske
lisa.teske@pnl.gov
509-372-6850
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

15-Jun-2007
Cytochrome studies provide biofuel cell potential
Researchers from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and collaborators have purified the protein called outer membrane cytochrome A (OmcA) from Shewanella oneidensis, a bacterium with promise for bioremediation of contaminants and the design of microbial fuel cells. They have measured its ability to bind and transfer electrons to mineral hematite, a solid ferric oxide. The team has shown that purified OmcA can directly reduce solid metals and that purified proteins are a next step in biofuel cell development.

Contact: Lisa Teske
lisa.teske@pnl.gov
509-372-6850
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

15-Jun-2007
Aerosol particles and cloud droplets -- Microscopic modulators of climate
Scientists around the world use sophisticated computer models to simulate future scenarios of all types -- including global climate. Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory are playing a key role in the improvement of these models by providing new information about the role of aerosols in the atmosphere.

Contact: Lisa Teske
lisa.teske@pnl.gov
509-372-6850
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

15-Jun-2007
Dust in the wind
In March 2006, a major dust storm occurred in Niamey, Niger. Although a common occurrence, this was the first time both satellite- and ground-based instruments were used simultaneously to assess the impact of airborne Saharan dust on incoming and outgoing solar radiation.

Contact: Lisa Teske
lisa.teske@pnl.gov
509-372-6850
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

15-Jun-2007
Hopping hydrogen
Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the University of Texas at Austin discovered that a single hydrogen atom just can't keep still after it splits from a water molecule on the surface of the catalyst rutile titanium oxide. The hydrogen atom hopscotches across the oxygen atoms that stud the surface of the catalyst, while the hydrogen on what is left from water remains fixed, suggesting that the electronic structure of this popular catalyst is not entirely as it seems.

Contact: Lisa Teske
lisa.teske@pnl.gov
509-372-6850
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

15-Jun-2007
PNNL's newest awards showcase airline safety and blackout prevention
Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have been recognized again this year by the Federal Laboratory Consortium for their efforts in commercializing PNNL-developed technologies.

Contact: Lisa Teske
lisa.teske@pnl.gov
509-372-6850
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

15-Jun-2007
Data-intensive computing laying foundation for biological breakthroughs
Biological breakthroughs to solve society's most challenging problems require innovative tools and a "different way" to analyze the enormous amounts of data being generated.

Contact: Lisa Teske
lisa.teske@pnl.gov
509-372-6850
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

15-Jun-2007
PNNL aims to move fast chemical weapon agentsensing technique from lab-top to prototype
In the same amount of time it takes to download software or print a picture, you now can detect a chemical weapon agent. Needless to say, technology is cool.

Contact: Lisa Teske
lisa.teske@pnl.gov
509-372-6850
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

15-Jun-2007
On thin icege/gi
Thin clouds high in the upper troposphere, like cirrus clouds, may have a significant influence on Earth's climate and enhance the "greenhouse effect" by absorbing more of the sun's radiation than they take in. Unknown is how ice crystals in these clouds absorb and reflect radiant energy and enhance the amount of radiant energy emitted toward the earth's surface.

Contact: Lisa Teske
lisa.teske@pnl.gov
509-372-6850
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

15-Jun-2007
Iron nanoparticles could lead to more effectives carbon tetrachloride cleanup
Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, the University of Minnesota and Oregon Health and Science University discovered that not all iron nanoparticles are created equal. Some, in fact, may be especially useful for cleaning up groundwater contaminated with carbon tetrachloride.Bi%3A1181862272

Contact: Lisa Teske
lisa.teske@pnl.gov
509-372-6850
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

14-Jun-2007
Taming the hairy mushroom
Fungi (yeasts, molds and mushrooms) have gotten a bad rap over the years. They have been blamed for infecting food crops and represent some of the most universal and costly pathogens known to man -- both of which overshadow the important contributions fungi make, such as providing critical agricultural nutrients and compounds for antibiotics.

Contact: Lisa Teske
lisa.teske@pnl.gov
509-372-6850
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

26-May-2007
Berkeley Lab, EPA studies confirm large public health and economic impact of dampness and mold
A pair of studies to be published in the journal Indoor Air have quantified the considerable public health risks and economic consequences in the United States from building dampness and mold.

Contact: Allan Chen
a_chen@lbl.gov
510-486-4210
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

25-May-2007
DOE releases 2007 Carbon Sequestration Technology Roadmap
The 2007 Carbon Sequestration Technology Roadmap and Program Plan was released today by the US Department of Energy's Carbon Sequestration Program.

Contact: Mike Jacobs
202-586-0507
DOE/National Energy Technology Laboratory

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