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Features Archive


Showing stories 1-25 out of 177 stories.
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16-Feb-2017
Protein structure solved from smallest crystals yet
An international team of scientists used an X-ray laser at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory to determine the structure of an insect virus's crystalline protein 'cocoon.'

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

25-Jan-2017
A rising peptide: Supercomputing helps scientists come closer to tailoring drug molecules
With the help of the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility's Mira supercomputer, scientists have successfully designed and verified stable versions of synthetic peptides, components that join together to form proteins.

Contact: Brian Grabowski
bgrabowski@anl.gov
630-252-1232
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

25-Jan-2017
Connecting the bytes
ORNL computer scientist focuses on maximizing utility of Titan.

Contact: Ron Walli
wallira@ornl.gov
865-576-0226
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

13-Jan-2017
Study of microbes reveals new insight about Earth's geology and carbon cycles
Tiny microbes play a big role in cycling carbon and other key elements through our air, water, soil and sediment. Researchers who study these processes at Argonne National Laboratory have discovered that these microbial communities are significantly affected by the types of carbon 'food' sources available. Their findings reveal that the type of carbon source affects not only the composition and activity of natural microbial communities, but also in turn the types of mineral products that form in their environment.

Contact: Brian Grabowski
bgrabowski@anl.gov
630-252-1232
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

12-Jan-2017
Celebrating climate data's wild blue yonder
The ARM Aerial Facility marks the first official decade of its high-flying aerial organization.

Contact: Hanna Goss
hanna.goss@pnnl.gov
509-375-3824
DOE/US Department of Energy

22-Dec-2016
For critical marine low clouds, a research and observation plan
Marine low clouds hover in the lowest couple of kilometers above the world's oceans. They produce little but drizzle, and could never match their deeper mid-continent cousin clouds for dramatic weather and severe storms. But marine low clouds are vastly important to the world's climate and energy balance.

Contact: Ethan Alpern
ethan.alpern@science.doe.gov
DOE/US Department of Energy

20-Dec-2016
Biology and neutrons collide to unlock secrets of fish ear bones
Scientific discovery can come from anywhere, but few researchers can say the answers to their questions would come from the pea-sized bones in the head of a six-foot-long, 200-pound prehistoric freshwater fish.

Contact: Sean Simoneau
simoneausm@ornl.gov
865-241-0709
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

20-Dec-2016
Scientists bear witness to birth of an ice cloud

Scientists have witnessed the birth of atmospheric ice clouds, creating ice cloud crystals in the laboratory and then taking images of the process through a microscope, essentially documenting the very first steps of cloud formation. The team took time-lapse movies of the first few seconds when a particle attracts water vapor, forming ice crystals that become the core of icy cirrus clouds - the high, wispy clouds that act much like a blanket for our planet.


Contact: Tom Rickey
tom.rickey@pnnl.gov
509-375-3732
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

20-Dec-2016
ARM/ASR veteran researchers win American Geophysical Union Ascent Awards
Susan van den Heever and Christian Jakob, two veteran Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility and Atmospheric System Research (ASR)-affiliated atmospheric scientists, have had their achievements recognized with Ascent Awards.

Contact: Hanna Goss
hanna.goss@pnnl.gov
DOE/US Department of Energy

15-Dec-2016
Data storage upgrades future-proof ARM field sites -- for now
Throughout 2016, Cory Stuart, ARM's Site Data System (SDS) and Cyber Security Manager, and his team at Argonne National Laboratory have been methodically visiting all ARM sites to upgrade the data systems, especially storage capacity.

Contact: Hanna Goss
hanna.goss@pnnl.gov
DOE/US Department of Energy

13-Dec-2016
Capturing clouds for LASSO leads to new radar techniques
The ARM Climate Research Facility has some of the best instruments in the world for measuring atmospheric properties, but achieving the highest-quality results requires knowing the optimal way to use them.

Contact: Hanna Goss
hanna.goss@pnnl.gov
DOE/US Department of Energy

28-Nov-2016
'Brighter than a billion suns': SLAC studies featured in TEDx Talk
Phil Manning and his colleagues have used synchrotron light for nearly a decade to help interpret the chemical signatures locked within fossilized life. Bright X-rays have allowed them to study fossilized worm burrows, recreate pigment patterns in ancient bird feathers, see how Jurassic dinosaur bones heal and image the living chemistry of 50-million year old plant fossils.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

17-Nov-2016
Photosynthesis: Gathering sunshine with the world's smallest antennas
Scientists are working to better understand the photosynthetic antenna complexes that capture sunlight for plants, algae and bacteria to use.

Contact: Shannon Brescher Shea
shannon.shea@science.doe.gov
DOE/US Department of Energy

9-Nov-2016
Scientists, interns bring structural biology's 'magic bullet' technique to X-ray lasers
To understand the 3-D shape of a protein, scientists often rely on information from similar molecules. But sometimes, the protein is so unique that it's not possible to find a close relative.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

3-Nov-2016
The destructive effects of supercooled liquid water on airplane safety and climate models
Exploring the properties of supercooled liquid water -- the bane of airplane wings and climate theorists -- Sandia Labs is mounting an expedition to fly huge tethered balloons in Alaska this winter, where temperatures descend to 40 degrees below zero and it's dark as a dungeon for all but a few hours of the day.

Contact: neal singer
nsinger@sandia.gov
505-845-7078
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

1-Sep-2016
Blowing bubbles to catch carbon dioxide
Sandia and UNM researchers developed a bio-inspired bubble-like membrane to capture CO2 from coal-fired power plants efficiently. The CO2 Memzyme could capture CO2 equivalent to planting 63 million trees and letting them grow for 10 years from just one power plant.

Contact: Mollie Rappe
mrappe@sandia.gov
505-844-8220
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

14-Jul-2016
Research begins at SLAC's newest X-ray laser experimental station
A new X-ray laser experimental station at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory recently welcomed its first research group, scientists from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

11-Jul-2016
Sandia storing information securely in DNA
Marlene and George Bachand, Sandia National Laboratories bioengineers at the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, developed a new method for encrypting and storing sensitive information in DNA.

Contact: Mollie Rappe
mrappe@sandia.gov
505-844-8220
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

19-May-2016
Berkeley Lab's OpenMSI licensed to ImaBiotech
Two years ago, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) researchers developed OpenMSI--the most advanced computational tool for analyzing and visualizing mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) data. Last year, this web-available tool was selected as one of the 100 most technologically significant new products of the year by R&D Magazine. Now, OpenMSI has been licensed to support ImaBiotech's Multimaging™ technology in the field of pharmaceutical and cosmetic research and development.

Contact: Linda Vu
lvu@lbl.gov
510-495-2402
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

17-May-2016
Lessons from cow eyes
Cornea tissue is a promising biomaterial for Brad Boyce, a Sandia National Laboratories materials scientist. More than a decade after Boyce and his co-workers investigated the biomechanics of dissected cow corneas, their findings have been confirmed in healthy human eyes.

Contact: Mollie Rappe
mrappe@sandia.gov
505-844-8220
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

12-May-2016
Solving the biomass puzzle
Biomass holds great promise as a petroleum replacement, but unlocking its true potential remains a puzzle. A group of researchers at Iowa State University and the US Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory hope to develop the pieces of that puzzle to create a clearer picture of what takes place within a plant and how that applies to its downstream uses as biomass.

Contact: Kerry Gibson
kgibson@ameslab.gov
515-294-1405
DOE/Ames Laboratory

11-May-2016
Students from Maryland and California win DOE's 26th National Science Bowl®
Students from Montgomery Blair High School from Silver Spring, Md. won the 2016 US Department of Energy (DOE) National Science Bowl® (NSB) today in Washington D.C. This year's championship team in the middle school competition is Joaquin Miller Middle School from San Jose, Calif.

Contact: Ethan Alpern
ethan.alpern@science.doe.gov
202-586-4307
DOE/US Department of Energy

11-May-2016
Sandia/California invites community to 60th anniversay celebration
Sandia will commemorate the 60th anniversary of its California site with a community event in downtown Livermore on Saturday, May 21 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Held at the Bankhead Theater, 2400 First Street, it will feature technology displays and demonstrations, national security speakers, hands-on science activities and recruiting.

Contact: Patti Koning
pkoning@sandia.gov
925-294-4911
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

4-May-2016
How Ameriflux helped determine the impact of the 2012 US drought on the carbon cycle
In 2012, the United States experienced the warmest spring on record followed by the most severe drought since the Dust Bowl. A team of scientists used a network of Ameriflux sites to map the carbon flux across the United States during the drought.

Contact: Dan Krotz
dakrotz@lbl.gov
510-486-4019
Doe-Anderson

26-Apr-2016
The Pellet Stove Design Challenge: We have a winner!
At Brookhaven Lab last week, seven finalists competed to be designated the top-performing pellet stove. The three-day Pellet Stove Design Challenge, organized by the Alliance for Green Heat, featured stove demonstrations and testing as well as presentations and round-table discussions on a variety of issues.

Contact: Kay Cordtz
kcordtz@bnl.gov
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Showing stories 1-25 out of 177 stories.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>


 

 

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