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Showing stories 1-25 out of 145 stories.
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16-Jan-2018
Power hour

Argonne's Education department partnered with the U.S. Department of Energy's Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory and the University of Chicago and sent 50 scientists to Chicago area schools in December as part of the global Hour of Code.


Contact: Justin H.S. Breaux
jbreaux@anl.gov
630-252-5274
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

9-Jan-2018
Q&A: Alan Heirich and Elliott Slaughter take on SLAC's big data challenges

As the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory builds the next generation of powerful instruments for groundbreaking research in X-ray science, astronomy and other fields, its Computer Science Division is preparing for the onslaught of data these instruments will produce.


Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

6-Dec-2017
Heavy metal: How first supernovae altered early star formation

An international team of cosmologists and astrophysicists ran multi-scale, multi-physics 2-D and 3-D simulations at the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center to illustrate how heavy metals expelled from exploding supernovae held the first stars in the universe regulate subsequent star formation and influence the appearance of galaxies in the process.


Contact: Kathy Kincade
kkincade@lbl.gov
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

6-Dec-2017
Goodyear, Sandia Labs mark 25 years of using computer simulations to improve tire design

Sandia National Laboratories and The Goodyear Tire & Rubber Company have worked together for 25 years to create better vehicle tires and more advanced computational mechanics.


Contact: Sue Holmes
sholmes@sandia.gov
505-844-6362
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

28-Nov-2017
High-performance computing cuts particle collision data prep time

For the first time, scientists have used high-performance computing (HPC) to reconstruct the data collected by a nuclear physics experiment -- an advance that could dramatically reduce the time it takes to make detailed data available for scientific discoveries.


Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

28-Nov-2017
What Can Science Gain from Computers that Learn?

Researchers are grappling with increasingly large quantities of image-based data. Machine learning and deep learning offer researchers new ways to analyze images quickly and more efficiently than ever before. Scientists at multiple national laboratories are working together to harness the potential of these tools.


Contact: Shannon Brescher Shea
shannon.shea@science.doe.gov
DOE/US Department of Energy

20-Nov-2017
GraphBLAS: Building blocks for high performance graph analytics

After nearly five years of collaboration between researchers in academia, industry and national research laboratories -- including Berkeley Lab's Aydn BuluÁ--GraphBLAS, a collection of standardized building blocks for graph algorithms in the language of linear algebra, is publicly available.


Contact: Linda Vu
lvu@lbl.gov
510-495-2402
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

9-Nov-2017
Argonne forms new divisions to focus on computation and data science strengths

Argonne has formed two new research divisions to focus its lab-wide foundational expertise on computational science and data science activities.


Contact: Brian Grabowski
bgrabowski@anl.gov
630-252-1232
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

1-Nov-2017
Berkeley Lab-led ECP Pagoda project rolls out first exascale software libraries

Just one year after the Department of Energy's Exascale Computing Program began funding projects to prepare scientific applications for exascale supercomputers, the Pagoda Project -- led by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory -- has successfully reached a major milestone: making its open source software libraries publicly available as of Sept. 30, 2017.


Contact: Kathy Kincade
kkincade@lbl.gov
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

18-Oct-2017
Using supercomputers to delve ever deeper into the building blocks of matter

Physicists and computational scientists at Brookhaven Lab will help to develop the next generation of computational tools to push the field of nuclear physics forward.


Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

17-Oct-2017
2017 Techwomen foster collaborations at Berkeley Lab and around the globe

Scientific Diplomacy: Three Berkeley Lab scientists are collaborating with two Techwomen -- Patu Ndango from Cameroon and Rim Abid from Tunisia -- on quality control methods for constrained environments.


Contact: Linda Vu
lvu@lbl.gov
510-495-2402
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

17-Oct-2017
Exascale and the city

The Argonne-led Multiscale Coupled Urban Systems project will create a computational framework for urban developers and planners to evaluate integrated models of city systems and processes. With this framework, city planners can better examine complex systems, understand the relationships between them and predict how changes will affect them. It can ultimately help officials identify the best solutions to benefit urban communities.


Contact: Brian Grabowski
bgrabowski@anl.gov
630-252-1232
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

9-Oct-2017
Leaning into the supercomputing learning curve

Scientists need to learn how to take advantage of exascale computing. This is the mission of the Argonne Training Program on Extreme-Scale Computing (ATPESC), which held its annual two-week training workshops over the summer.


Contact: Brian Grabowski
bgrabowski@anl.gov
630-252-1232
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

6-Oct-2017
Connecting the dots

Nuclear physicists at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory and their partners are using America's most powerful supercomputers to characterize the behavior of objects, from subatomic neutrons to neutron stars, that differ dramatically in size yet are closely connected by physics. Through the DOE Office of Science's Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing program, which concurrently advances science and supercomputing to accelerate discovery, ORNL is participating in two five-year computational nuclear physics projects.


Contact: Dawn Levy
levyd@ornl.gov
865-576-6448
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

25-Sep-2017
Eight-lab simulator linkup aims to boost future electric grid stability

A team of researchers in the US and Europe are part of the Real-Time Super Lab concept to study how electricity can be rerouted across vast distances to address disruptions. The team envisions that large-scale blackouts can be prevented by moving electricity intercontinentally, the same way utilities currently do regionally but at a much larger scale. Such global interaction can reduce the cost of outages and make electrical power grids of the future more resilient.


Contact: Nicole Stricker
nicole.stricker@inl.gov
208-526-5955
DOE/Idaho National Laboratory

21-Sep-2017
From science to finance: SLAC summer interns forge new paths in STEM

Internships at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory have a way of opening surprising doors to the future.


Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

19-Sep-2017
A TOAST for next generation CMB experiments
Computational cosmologists at Berkeley Lab they recently achieved a critical milestone in preparation for upcoming CMB experiments: scaling their data simulation and reduction framework TOAST to run on all 658,784 Intel Knights Landing Xeon Phi processor cores on the NERSC's Cori. The team also implemented a new module to simulate the noise introduced when ground-based telescopes look at the CMB through the atmosphere.

Contact: Linda Vu
lvu@lbl.gov
510-495-2402
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

23-Aug-2017
The Wonderland of ALICE: Q&A with Thomas M. Cormier

An experiment called ALICE at the Large Hadron Collider is dedicated to the study of heavy-ion collisions. ALICE stands for 'A Large Ion Collider Experiment.' Its aim is spotting the high-energy, elementary particles, like electrons and gamma rays, streaming from the quark-gluon plasma, to explore the physics of the early universe. Oak Ridge National Laboratory physicist Thomas M. Cormier provides an update on the experiment.


Contact: Dawn Levy
levyd@ornl.gov
865-576-6448
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

22-Aug-2017
Launching a supercomputer: How to set up some of the world's fastest computers

Setting up a supercomputer is far more complicated than just bringing it home from the electronics store. Staff members of the Department of Energy's supercomputing user facilities spend years on the process, from laying out requirements through troubleshooting. In the end, they run some of the most powerful computers in the world to help solve some of science's biggest problems.


Contact: Shannon Brescher Shea
shannon.shea@science.doe.gov
DOE/US Department of Energy

12-Jul-2017
Tackling disease in three dimensions: Supercomputers help decode RNA structure
In collaboration with staff from the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility, researchers at the National Cancer Institute have perfected a technique that accurately computes the 3-D structure of RNA sequences. This method, which relies on a computer program known as RS3D and supercomputer Mira gives researchers studying cancer and other diseases structural insights about associated RNAs that can be used to advance computer-assisted drug design and development.

Contact: Brian Grabowski
bgrabowski@anl.gov
630-252-1232
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

11-Jul-2017
Scientists see molecules 'breathe' in remarkable detail

In a milestone for studying a class of chemical reactions relevant to novel solar cells and memory storage devices, an international team of researchers working at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory used an X-ray laser to watch 'molecular breathing' -- waves of subtle in-and-out motions of atoms -- in real time and unprecedented detail.


Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

6-Jul-2017
ORNL researchers apply imaging, computational expertise to St. Jude research
In the quest to better understand and cure childhood diseases, scientists at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital accumulate enormous amounts of data from powerful video microscopes. To help St. Jude scientists mine that trove of data, researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory have created custom algorithms that can provide a deeper understanding of the images and quicken the pace of research.

Contact: Stephanie Seay
seaysg@ornl.gov
865-576-9894
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

5-Jul-2017
Will brain-inspired chips make a dent in science's big data problems?
Although neuromorphic computing is still in its infancy, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) researchers hope that these tiny, low-power, brain-inspired computing systems could one day help alleviate some of science's big data challenges. With funding from the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program, two groups of researchers are exploring how science might benefit from this new technology.

Contact: Linda Vu
lvu@lbl.gov
510-495-2402
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

20-Jun-2017
Chicago Quantum Exchange to create technologically transformative ecosystem
The University of Chicago is collaborating with the US Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory and Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory to launch an intellectual hub for advancing academic, industrial and governmental efforts in the science and engineering of quantum information.

Contact: Andre Salles
media@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

19-May-2017
A fresh math perspective opens new possibilities for computational chemistry
A new mathematical "shortcut" developed by Berkeley Lab researchers is speeding up molecular absorption calculations by a factor of five, so simulations that used to take 10 to 15 hours to compute can now be done in approximately 2.5 hours. These algorithms will be incorporated in an upcoming release of the widely used NWChem computational chemistry software suite later this year.

Contact: Linda Vu
lvu@lbl.gov
510-495-2402
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Showing stories 1-25 out of 145 stories.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>


 

 

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