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Showing stories 1-25 out of 385 stories.
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18-Jul-2017
Bio-inspired materials: Borrowing from nature's playbook

Nature provides myriad examples of unique materials and structures developed for specialized applications or adaptations. An interdisciplinary group of researchers at the US Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory is trying to unlock the secrets that organisms use to build such complex structures so that power can be used to create materials not found in nature and not capable of being synthesized by conventional means.


Contact: Kerry Gibson
kgibson@ameslab.gov
515-294-1405
DOE/Ames Laboratory

18-Jul-2017
Report: Compact, precise beam could aid in nuclear securityeam Could Aid in Nuclear Security
A Berkeley Lab-led report highlights a new, compact technique for producing beams with precisely controlled energy and direction that could 'see' through thick steel and concrete to more easily detect and identify concealed or smuggled nuclear materials for national security and other applications.

Contact: Glenn Roberts Jr.
geroberts@lbl.gov
510-486-5582
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

17-Jul-2017
No assembly required: Nanoparticles that put themselves together
Scientists may be able to use self-assembly to design new materials with custom characteristics. Understanding self-assembly is particularly important for working with nanoparticles. Scientists supported by the Department of Energy are investigating two major methods of self-assembly. They are looking into both particles that assemble on their own as well as 'nano-Velcro' that can pull together particles that wouldn't otherwise connect on their own.

Contact: Shannon Brescher Shea
shannon.shea@science.doe.gov
DOE/US Department of Energy

12-Jul-2017
Tackling disease in three dimensions: Supercomputers help decode RNA structure
In collaboration with staff from the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility, researchers at the National Cancer Institute have perfected a technique that accurately computes the 3-D structure of RNA sequences. This method, which relies on a computer program known as RS3D and supercomputer Mira gives researchers studying cancer and other diseases structural insights about associated RNAs that can be used to advance computer-assisted drug design and development.

Contact: Brian Grabowski
bgrabowski@anl.gov
630-252-1232
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

11-Jul-2017
Scientists see molecules 'breathe' in remarkable detail

In a milestone for studying a class of chemical reactions relevant to novel solar cells and memory storage devices, an international team of researchers working at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory used an X-ray laser to watch 'molecular breathing' -- waves of subtle in-and-out motions of atoms -- in real time and unprecedented detail.


Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

6-Jul-2017
ORNL researchers apply imaging, computational expertise to St. Jude research
In the quest to better understand and cure childhood diseases, scientists at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital accumulate enormous amounts of data from powerful video microscopes. To help St. Jude scientists mine that trove of data, researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory have created custom algorithms that can provide a deeper understanding of the images and quicken the pace of research.

Contact: Stephanie Seay
seaysg@ornl.gov
865-576-9894
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

5-Jul-2017
Will brain-inspired chips make a dent in science's big data problems?
Although neuromorphic computing is still in its infancy, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) researchers hope that these tiny, low-power, brain-inspired computing systems could one day help alleviate some of science's big data challenges. With funding from the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program, two groups of researchers are exploring how science might benefit from this new technology.

Contact: Linda Vu
lvu@lbl.gov
510-495-2402
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

27-Jun-2017
Yi Cui named Blavatnik National Laureate
Pioneering nanoscientist Yi Cui, professor of materials science and engineering at Stanford University and of photon science at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, has been named a 2017 Blavatnik National Laureate. The $250,000 award recognizes the most promising researchers age 42 and younger at top US academic and research institutions.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

21-Jun-2017
Upgrades at Sandia Lab's Tonopah Test Range help weapons testing
It's been a challenge for Sandia National Laboratories' Tonopah Test Range to keep decades-old equipment running while gathering detailed information required for 21st century non-nuclear testing. Over the past several years, the Nevada range changed the analog brains in instruments to digital, moved to modern communications systems and upgraded telemetry and tracking equipment and computing systems.

Contact: Sue Holmes
sholmes@sandia.gov
505-844-6362
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

20-Jun-2017
R&D effort produces magnetic devices to enable more powerful X-ray lasers
Team of researchers at Berkeley and Argonne national labs have designed, built, and tested two magnetic devices that could make X-ray lasers more powerful, versatile, compact, and durable.

Contact: Glenn Roberts Jr.
geroberts@lbl.gov
510-486-5582
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

15-Jun-2017
How to build software for a computer 50 times faster than anything in the world
Researchers at Argonne are working to create new and adapt existing software technologies to operate at exascale by overcoming challenges found in several key areas, such as resiliency, data reduction, software libraries and the management of memory, power and computational resources.

Contact: Brian Grabowski
bgrabowski@anl.gov
630-252-1232
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

14-Jun-2017
New research finds a missing piece to high-temperature superconductor mystery
An international team led by scientists from the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and Stanford University has detected new features in the electronic behavior of a copper oxide material that may help explain why it becomes a perfect electrical conductor -- a superconductor -- at relatively high temperatures.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

8-Jun-2017
Argonne-developed technology for producing graphene wins TechConnect National Innovation Award
A method that significantly cuts the time and cost needed to grow graphene has won a 2017 TechConnect National Innovation Award. This is the second year in a row that a team at Argonne's Center for Nanoscale Materials has received this award.

Contact: Karen Mellen
kmellen@anl.gov
630-252-5325
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

6-Jun-2017
History of Sandia Labs rocketry told in award-winning film, 'It Really Is Rocket Science!'
Sandia National Laboratories tells the story of rocket testing and aerospace work at the labs through a new documentary, 'It Really Is Rocket Science!'

Contact: Sue Holmes
sholmes@sandia.gov
505-844-6362
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

31-May-2017
Seven small businesses to collaborate with Argonne to solve technical challenges
Seven small businesses have been selected to collaborate with researchers at Argonne to address technical challenges as part of DOE's Small Business Vouchers Program.

Contact: Alex Mitchell
amitchell@anl.gov
630-252-5573
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

22-May-2017
Report sheds new insights on the spin dynamics of a material candidate for low-power devices
In a report published in Nano Letters, Argonne researchers reveal new insights into the properties of a magnetic insulator that is a candidate for low-power device applications; their insights form early stepping-stones towards developing high-speed, low-power electronics that use electron spin rather than charge to carry information.

Contact: Jared Sagoff
jsagoff@anl.gov
630-252-5549
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

19-May-2017
A fresh math perspective opens new possibilities for computational chemistry
A new mathematical "shortcut" developed by Berkeley Lab researchers is speeding up molecular absorption calculations by a factor of five, so simulations that used to take 10 to 15 hours to compute can now be done in approximately 2.5 hours. These algorithms will be incorporated in an upcoming release of the widely used NWChem computational chemistry software suite later this year.

Contact: Linda Vu
lvu@lbl.gov
510-495-2402
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

18-May-2017
A 'wearable' brain scanner inspired by Brookhaven technology
Building on a Brookhaven Lab innovation designed for brain imaging in moving rats, a team in Virginia and West Virginia designs a device for studies of human interaction, dementia, movement disorders, and more.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

5-May-2017
Bacterial boost for bio-based fuels
"Electrical" bacteria are the key ingredient in a new process developed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory that recycles wastewater from biofuel production to generate hydrogen. The hydrogen can then be used to convert bio-oil into higher grade liquid fuels such as gasoline or diesel.

Contact: Morgan McCorkle
mccorkleml@ornl.gov
865-574-7308
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

5-May-2017
X-ray imaging and computer modeling help map electric properties of nanomaterials
Argonne researchers have developed a new approach for studying piezoelectric materials using ultrafast 3-D X-ray imaging and computer modeling. Their integrated approach, reported in Nano Letters, can help us better understand material behavior and engineer more powerful and energy-efficient technologies.

Contact: Jared Sagoff
jsagoff@anl.gov
630-252-5549
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

28-Apr-2017
Unexpected damage found rippling through promising exotic nanomaterials
Some of the most promising and puzzling phenomena in physics play out on the nanoscale, where a billionth-of-a-meter shift can make or break perfect electrical conductivity.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

27-Apr-2017
Special delivery: First shipment of magnetic devices for next-gen X-ray laser
The first shipment of powerful magnetic devices for a next-generation laser project arrived at their destination on Wednesday after a nearly 3,000-mile journey. Berkeley Lab is overseeing the development and delivery of these devices, called undulator segments.

Contact: Glenn Roberts Jr.
geroberts@lbl.gov
510-486-5582
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

21-Apr-2017
What can you study in femtoseconds? Materials
When Aaron Lindenberg was introduced to ultrafast science as a first-year grad student at UC Berkeley, he was immediately hooked. He knew he wanted to be part of a hot research field that explores nature's speediest processes and lets us see the world with different eyes.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

17-Apr-2017
How X-rays pushed topological matter research over the top
Pioneering X-ray experiments at Berkeley Lab's Advanced Light Source (ALS) helped bring to life decades-old theories about exotic topological states of matter, and the ALS continues to play an important role in this flourishing field of research.

Contact: Glenn Roberts Jr.
geroberts@lbl.gov
510-486-5582
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

13-Apr-2017
SLAC celebrates Femtosecond Week
Got a millionth of a billionth of a second? There's science that actually happens on this timescale. Join us online for a week of ultrafast science from April 17 to 21. Learn more about how scientists and engineers use electron beams and bright pulses of light from the Linac Coherent Light Source X-ray laser and other advanced lasers to capture some of nature's speediest processes that occur in just femtoseconds, or quadrillionths of a second.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

Showing stories 1-25 out of 385 stories.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>


 

 

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