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Features Archive


Showing stories 51-75 out of 414 stories.
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5-May-2017
Bacterial boost for bio-based fuels
"Electrical" bacteria are the key ingredient in a new process developed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory that recycles wastewater from biofuel production to generate hydrogen. The hydrogen can then be used to convert bio-oil into higher grade liquid fuels such as gasoline or diesel.

Contact: Morgan McCorkle
mccorkleml@ornl.gov
865-574-7308
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

5-May-2017
X-ray imaging and computer modeling help map electric properties of nanomaterials
Argonne researchers have developed a new approach for studying piezoelectric materials using ultrafast 3-D X-ray imaging and computer modeling. Their integrated approach, reported in Nano Letters, can help us better understand material behavior and engineer more powerful and energy-efficient technologies.

Contact: Jared Sagoff
jsagoff@anl.gov
630-252-5549
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

28-Apr-2017
Unexpected damage found rippling through promising exotic nanomaterials
Some of the most promising and puzzling phenomena in physics play out on the nanoscale, where a billionth-of-a-meter shift can make or break perfect electrical conductivity.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

27-Apr-2017
Special delivery: First shipment of magnetic devices for next-gen X-ray laser
The first shipment of powerful magnetic devices for a next-generation laser project arrived at their destination on Wednesday after a nearly 3,000-mile journey. Berkeley Lab is overseeing the development and delivery of these devices, called undulator segments.

Contact: Glenn Roberts Jr.
geroberts@lbl.gov
510-486-5582
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

21-Apr-2017
What can you study in femtoseconds? Materials
When Aaron Lindenberg was introduced to ultrafast science as a first-year grad student at UC Berkeley, he was immediately hooked. He knew he wanted to be part of a hot research field that explores nature's speediest processes and lets us see the world with different eyes.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

17-Apr-2017
How X-rays pushed topological matter research over the top
Pioneering X-ray experiments at Berkeley Lab's Advanced Light Source (ALS) helped bring to life decades-old theories about exotic topological states of matter, and the ALS continues to play an important role in this flourishing field of research.

Contact: Glenn Roberts Jr.
geroberts@lbl.gov
510-486-5582
DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

13-Apr-2017
SLAC celebrates Femtosecond Week
Got a millionth of a billionth of a second? There's science that actually happens on this timescale. Join us online for a week of ultrafast science from April 17 to 21. Learn more about how scientists and engineers use electron beams and bright pulses of light from the Linac Coherent Light Source X-ray laser and other advanced lasers to capture some of nature's speediest processes that occur in just femtoseconds, or quadrillionths of a second.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

11-Apr-2017
New SLAC theory institute aims to speed research on exotic materials at light sources
A new institute at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory is using the power of theory to search for new types of materials that could revolutionize society -- by making it possible, for instance, to transmit electricity over power lines with no loss.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

27-Mar-2017
The power of 1
When it comes to creating new materials, single crystals play an important role in presenting a clearer picture of a material's intrinsic properties. A typical material will be comprised of lots of smaller crystals and the grain boundaries between these crystals can act as impediments, affecting properties such as electrical or thermal resistance.

Contact: Laura Millsaps
millsaps@ameslab.gov
515-294-3474
DOE/Ames Laboratory

27-Mar-2017
Valerie Taylor named Argonne's Mathematics and Computer Science division director
Computer scientist Valerie Taylor has been appointed as the next director of the Mathematics and Computer Science division at Argonne, effective July 3, 2017.

Contact: Brian Grabowski
bgrabowski@anl.gov
630-252-1232
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

16-Mar-2017
Lake Park High School wins Argonne's 2017 Rube Goldberg Machine Challenge
In 75 steps, Lake Park High School won Argonne's Rube Goldberg Machine Challenge. They now go on to the national competition in Columbus, Ohio.

Contact: Justin H. S. Breaux
jbreaux@anl.gov
630-252-5274
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

14-Mar-2017
Two-dimensional MXene materials get their close-up
Researchers have long sought electrically conductive materials for economical energy-storage devices. Two-dimensional (2D) ceramics called MXenes are contenders. ORNL scientists using state-of-the-art scanning transmission electron microscopy provided the first direct evidence of the atomic-defect configurations in a titanium-carbide MXene synthesized at Drexel University. Published in ACS Nano, a journal of the American Chemical Society, the study coupled atomic-scale characterization and electrical property measurements with theory-based simulation.

Contact: Dawn Levy
levyd@ornl.gov
865-576-6448
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

9-Mar-2017
Cracking the Mystery of Perfect Efficiency: Investigating Superconductors
A whole new area of research emerged from the discovery of superconductivity in 1911. Since then, scientists have learned why some materials superconduct near absolute zero and have discovered 'high-temperature' superconductors. Now, researchers supported by the Department of Energy's Office of Science are working to identify a common characteristic of high-temperature superconductors in hopes of one day developing one that works at room temperature.

Contact: Shannon Brescher Shea
shannon.shea@science.doe.gov
DOE/US Department of Energy

2-Mar-2017
Exploring the evolution of nuclear deterrence through interviews, historical footage
Sandia National Laboratories explores the evolution of nuclear deterrence in a new documentary that combines modern and historical footage with a wide range of interviews. On Deterrence features interviews with former secretaries of defense, general officers, policymakers, analysts, scholars and scientists with varied viewpoints to describe the impact of nuclear deterrence since the end of World War II.

Contact: Sue Holmes
sholmes@sandia.gov
505-844-6362
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

2-Mar-2017
Evaluating nuclear weapons: Sandia Labs taking a modern approach
Sandia National Laboratories is transforming how it assesses nuclear weapons in a stockpile made up of weapons at different stages in their lifecycles -- some systems that have existed for decades alongside those that have undergone life extension programs.

Contact: Sue Holmes
sholmes@sandia.gov
505-844-6362
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

1-Mar-2017
Scientists discover magnetic 'persuasion' in neighboring metals
Certain materials can be swayed by their neighbors to become magnetic, according to a new Argonne study.

Contact: Jared Sagoff
jsagoff@anl.gov
630-252-5549
Doe-Anderson

28-Feb-2017
The heat is on
NASA is developing a new family of flexible heat-shield systems with a woven carbon-fiber base material, and is using X-rays at Berkeley Lab's Advanced Light Source to test the designs.

Contact: Glenn Roberts Jr.
geroberts@lbl.gov
510-486-5582
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

21-Feb-2017
When rocket science meets X-ray science
NASA and Berkeley Lab researchers have teamed up to explore next-generation spacecraft materials at the microscale using an X-ray technique that produces 3-D images. This work could help ensure future spacecraft survive the rigors of otherworldly atmospheres.

Contact: Glenn Roberts Jr.
geroberts@lbl.gov
510-486-5582
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

20-Feb-2017
Breakthrough wireless sensing system attracts industry and government agency interest
Top experts in environmental sensing explored existing and potential applications for Waggle and other sensing technologies during a two-day workshop held at Argonne last year. From researching deforestation in the Amazon to improving air quality for manned space missions, attendees revealed unique ways to apply sensing technology to improve our understanding of Earth and human health -- and a number of these applications employed Waggle.

Contact: Brian Grabowski
bgrabowski@anl.gov
630-252-1232
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

10-Feb-2017
Exploring mysteries on the surface
Ames Laboratory scientists Pat Thiel and Michael Tringides are explorers, discovering the unique properties of two-dimensional (2-D) materials and metals grown on graphene, graphite, and other carbon coated surfaces.

Contact: Laura Millsaps
millsaps@ameslab.gov
DOE/Ames Laboratory

27-Jan-2017
Co-design centers to help make next-generation exascale computing a reality
As collaborators in four co-design centers created by the Department of Energy's Exascale Computing Project (ECP), researchers at Argonne are helping to overcome some of the complex challenges in developing exascale supercomputers.

Contact: Brian Grabowski
bgrabowski@anl.gov
630-252-1232
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

25-Jan-2017
Connecting the bytes
ORNL computer scientist focuses on maximizing utility of Titan.

Contact: Ron Walli
wallira@ornl.gov
865-576-0226
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

17-Jan-2017
Race for a better fuel begins with NREL researchers
Watching cars zoom around and around an oval track isn't Jesse Hensley's idea of a good time. Making them run on biofuel would be. On the Colorado campus of the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), where the posted speed limit is 20 mph, Hensley and his team have been racing toward a future where high-octane biofuel could push automobile performance further.

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

12-Jan-2017
Perfect powder: Ames Laboratory perfects metal powders for manufacturing
Ames Laboratory's high-pressure gas atomization process has garnered the laboratory at least 16 patents over the last two decades and created a spin-off company.

Contact: Laura Millsaps
lbmillsaps@gmail.com
515-294-3474
DOE/Ames Laboratory

12-Jan-2017
Fast track control accelerates switching of quantum bits
An international collaboration among physicists at the University of Chicago, Argonne National Laboratory, McGill University and the University of Konstanz recently demonstrated a new framework for faster control of a quantum bit -- the basic unit of information in yet-to-be created quantum computers -- in findings published online Nov. 28 in Nature Physics. Their experiments on a single electron in a diamond chip could create quantum devices less prone to errors when operated at high speeds.

Contact: Jared Sagoff
jsagoff@anl.gov
630-252-5549
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Showing stories 51-75 out of 414 stories.
<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 > >>


 

 

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