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Showing stories 26-50 out of 421 stories.
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15-Jun-2016
Theorist receives APS award
Theorist Anatoly Radyushkin, with Jefferson Lab and Old Dominion University, was named the winner of the the 2015 Jesse W. Beams Research Award. The prize, awarded by the Southeastern Section of the American Physical Society, recognizes especially significant or meritorious research in physics.

Contact: Deb Magaldi
magaldi@jlab.org
757-269-5102
DOE/Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

9-Jun-2016
Ames Laboratory Scientists Leave Their Mark on Future Researchers
Eight out of the past 10 years, Ames Laboratory chemist Aaron Sadow has mentored a Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internships student. Sometimes the mentorship has been for the 10-week summer program and sometimes for the 16-week semester program. On occasion, he's mentored more than one student at a time.

Contact: Steve Karsjen
karsjen@ameslab.gov
515-294-5643
Doe-Anderson

6-Jun-2016
Scientists Use a Frozen Gas to Boost Laser Light to New Extremes
Researchers at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University and Louisiana State University have achieved an even more dramatic HHG shift by shining an infrared laser through argon gas that's been frozen into a thin, fragile solid whose atoms barely cling to each other.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

2-Jun-2016
World's fastest multiframe digital X-ray camera created at Sandia
Physicists struggling to achieve laboratory-scale nuclear fusion know that a rogue event occurring between successively monitored images may knock an otherwise promising experiment off-kilter without anyone seeing the cause.To narrow that unexamined patch of time, Sandia National Laboratories researchers have put together the fastest multiframe digital X-ray camera in the world, called the ultra-fast X-ray imager (UXI). The camera takes images with an exposure time of only 1.5 nanoseconds.

Contact: neal singer
nsinger@swcp.com
505-845-7078
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

1-Jun-2016
Prototype of LUX-ZEPLIN dark matter detector tested at SLAC
Prototyping of a new, ultrasensitive 'eye' for dark matter is making rapid progress at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory: Researchers and engineers have installed a small-scale version of the future LUX-ZEPLIN (LZ) detector to test, develop and troubleshoot various aspects of its technology.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

27-May-2016
ORNL researchers use strain to engineer first high-performance, two-way oxide catalyst
Catalysts make chemical reactions more likely to occur. In most cases, a catalyst that's good at driving chemical reactions in one direction is bad at driving reactions in the opposite direction. However, a research team led by the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory has created the first high-performance, two-way oxide catalyst and filed a patent application for the invention. The accomplishment is reported in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Dawn Levy
levyd@ornl.gov
865-576-6448
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

19-May-2016
Thin film work is poster child for getting research and development to industry
Sandia National Laboratories researcher Paul Vianco sees his work on thin films as a poster child for the way research and development work can boost US industry.

Contact: Sue Holmes
sholmes@sandia.gov
505-844-6362
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

17-May-2016
Lessons from cow eyes
Cornea tissue is a promising biomaterial for Brad Boyce, a Sandia National Laboratories materials scientist. More than a decade after Boyce and his co-workers investigated the biomechanics of dissected cow corneas, their findings have been confirmed in healthy human eyes.

Contact: Mollie Rappe
mrappe@sandia.gov
505-844-8220
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

17-May-2016
Q&A: Hitomi researchers talk about the X-ray satellite's tragic end and the data it sent home
In this Q&A, three researchers from the Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology (KIPAC), a joint institute of Stanford University and the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, explain the circumstances of Hitomi's tragic accident and express their hopes for future X-ray satellite missions.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

13-May-2016
More than 12,000 explore Jefferson Lab during April 30 open house
This article provides highlights from the Jefferson Lab open house held in Newport News, Va., on April 30, 2016. Jefferson Lab is a Dept. of Energy funded basic nuclear physics research laboratory.

Contact: Deb Magaldi
magaldi@jlab.org
757-269-5102
DOE/Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

12-May-2016
Extracting miniature diamonds from crude
Stanford and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory jointly run the world's leading program for isolating and studying diamondoids -- the tiniest possible specks of diamond. Found naturally in petroleum fluids, these interlocking carbon cages weigh less than a billionth of a billionth of a carat (a carat weighs about the same as 12 grains of rice); the smallest ones contain just 10 atoms.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

11-May-2016
Students from Maryland and California win DOE's 26th National Science Bowl®
Students from Montgomery Blair High School from Silver Spring, Md. won the 2016 US Department of Energy (DOE) National Science Bowl® (NSB) today in Washington D.C. This year's championship team in the middle school competition is Joaquin Miller Middle School from San Jose, Calif.

Contact: Ethan Alpern
ethan.alpern@science.doe.gov
202-586-4307
DOE/US Department of Energy

11-May-2016
Major upgrade of the Lithium Tokamak Experiment at PPPL
This article describes installation of powerful neutral beam injector to Lithium Tokamak Experiment.

Contact: John Greenwald
jgreenwa@pppl.gov
609-243-2672
DOE/Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

11-May-2016
Sandia/California invites community to 60th anniversay celebration
Sandia will commemorate the 60th anniversary of its California site with a community event in downtown Livermore on Saturday, May 21 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Held at the Bankhead Theater, 2400 First Street, it will feature technology displays and demonstrations, national security speakers, hands-on science activities and recruiting.

Contact: Patti Koning
pkoning@sandia.gov
925-294-4911
DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

9-May-2016
Large Hadron Collider prepares to deliver 6 times the data
After months of winter hibernation, the Large Hadron Collider is once again smashing protons and taking data. The LHC will run around the clock for the next six months and produce roughly 2 quadrillion high-quality proton collisions, six times more than in 2015 and just shy of the total number of collisions recorded during the nearly three years of the collider's first run.

Contact: Andre Salles
media@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

5-May-2016
SLAC's historic linac turns 50 and gets a makeover
Since the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory powered up its 'linac' half a century ago, the 2-mile-long particle accelerator has driven a large number of successful research programs in particle physics, accelerator development and X-ray science. Now, the historic particle highway is getting a makeover that will pave the way for more groundbreaking research.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

2-May-2016
Could aluminum nitride be engineered to produce quantum bits?
The leading method for creating quantum bits, or qubits, currently involves exploiting the structural defects in diamonds. But using NERSC resources, University of Chicago researchers found that the same defect could be engineered in cheaper aluminum nitride. If confirmed by experiments, this could significantly reduce the cost of manufacturing quantum technologies.

Contact: Linda Vu
lvu@lbl.gov
510-495-2402
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

26-Apr-2016
The Pellet Stove Design Challenge: We have a winner!
At Brookhaven Lab last week, seven finalists competed to be designated the top-performing pellet stove. The three-day Pellet Stove Design Challenge, organized by the Alliance for Green Heat, featured stove demonstrations and testing as well as presentations and round-table discussions on a variety of issues.

Contact: Kay Cordtz
kcordtz@bnl.gov
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

21-Apr-2016
Stellar idea
This profile of an early career physicist highlights her research in developing new gas jet targets for use in next-generation nuclear physics experiments.

Contact: Ron Walli
wallira@ornl.gov
865-576-0226
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

20-Apr-2016
Peering deep into materials with ultrafast science
Creating the batteries or electronics of the future requires understanding materials that are just a few atoms thick and that change their fundamental physical properties in fractions of a second. Cutting-edge facilities at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and Stanford University have allowed researchers like Aaron Lindenberg to visualize properties of these nanoscale materials at ultrafast time scales.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

15-Apr-2016
SLAC researchers recreate the extreme universe in the lab
Conditions in the vast universe can be quite extreme: Violent collisions scar the surfaces of planets. Nuclear reactions in bright stars generate tremendous amounts of energy. Gigantic explosions catapult matter far out into space. But how exactly do processes like these unfold? What do they tell us about the universe? To find out, researchers from the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory perform sophisticated experiments and computer simulations that recreate violent cosmic conditions on a small scale in the lab.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

7-Apr-2016
Physicists build ultra-powerful accelerator magnet
The next generation of cutting-edge accelerator magnets is no longer just an idea. Recent tests revealed that the United States and CERN have successfully co-created a prototype superconducting accelerator magnet that is much more powerful than those currently inside the Large Hadron Collider.

Contact: Andre Salles
asalles@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

6-Apr-2016
Six weighty facts about gravity
Gravity: we barely ever think about it, at least until we slip on ice or stumble on the stairs. To many ancient thinkers, gravity wasn't even a force -- it was just the natural tendency of objects to sink toward the center of Earth, while planets were subject to other, unrelated laws.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC/Fermilab

5-Apr-2016
Chalice receptors attract metal contaminants with new chemical selectivity
Researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory found new ways to influence selectivity for specific positively charged ions (cations) with the addition of simple receptors, not for cations but rather for negatively charged ions (anions). This discovery proves that adding an anion receptor can affect the selectivity of extractants used to separate metals. Better selectivity via the addition of anion receptors to enhance discrimination between metals, such as sodium and cesium, could improve future environmental cleanup efforts.

Contact: Dawn Levy
levyd@ornl.gov
865-576-6448
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

5-Apr-2016
NREL supports Native American tribes in clean energy transformational leadership
In the redwood country of northern California, where arboreal giants can live to be 2,000 years old and can reach heights of more than 375 feet, the Blue Lake Rancheria Tribe has also grown something historic: a vision of climate sustainability and leadership.

Contact: David Glickson
david.glickson@nrel.gov
303-275-4097
DOE/National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Showing stories 26-50 out of 421 stories.
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